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I have an Abstract class called Function which has 2 inheriting classes (actually 6, but for example 2).

The first inheriting class will be called Push, the other Lift.

The base class will have simple methods and members like Execute(int Distance), Direction etc..

But the child classes will have individual and unique members, for instance Push will have int friction, and Lift will have int gravity (My one is btw more complicated)

So if I have a List< Function >, how would I edit the gravity member if the object were Lift or the friction if it were Push?

Please do not say "Why not make Friction and gravity the same int, and put it in the base class."

I was thinking that the base class could have getData() and setData(), which would take an Array and the child classes can use data in the array and handle it differently whilst being able to send different data too.

EDIT: For people stuck with this problem, if possible use a property grid it works much better and is not error prone.

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1  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/6515460/… –  user414076 Jan 24 '12 at 19:25
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First, if you need to access specific members of the classes...you shouldn't treat them as a List<Function>.

That being said, you should be able to do something like (using the is/as operators):

foreach(var f in functions)
{
    if(f is Push) { (f as Push).Friction = 4; }
    if(f is Lift) { (f as Lift).Gravity = 4; }
}
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Agreed. The getData()/setData() seems error-prone - would you accidentally try to set the friction in a Lift object? You could also try a design pattern such as the Visitor that helps this polymorphic behavior... –  Rob I Jan 24 '12 at 19:25
    
I voted up because it is the right answer, (or it at least leads to a right answer), but I don't know if I like those 1 line if statements. –  Sam I am Jan 24 '12 at 19:29
    
@Sam, I'm sure the one liners are for quick readability in a scrunched space. The real issue with such an approach is the OP states there are 6 derived classes, so you might have 6 such type-checkers. Say you add 7, 8, and 9. Now you have to come here in modify this method, as well, which is a violation of the Open Closed Principle. At any rate, I very much agree with this answer's first sentence. –  user414076 Jan 24 '12 at 19:32
    
Thanks for the quick responce, i know my question sounds very unsafe, but i put them all in a list, since i need to serialize them, and backwards compatabilty, Will try!!! THANKS!!! –  BananaPoop Jan 25 '12 at 10:45
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Justin Niessner's answer is correct, but If you'd rather use a getter type of implimentation, you can use properties

put the following in your base class

public virtual int DataItem {get; set;}

and then in Push you can override the property. do the same for other classes

public virtual int DataItem
{
    get
    {
        return Friction;
    }
    set
    {
        Friction = value;
    }
}

that way, you can do something like

int frictionOrGravity = item.DataItem;
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Why not have an abstract function in the base class that takes in some int, and then each subclass can override it with the functionality it needs? For example:

class Function {
    protected abstract void SetData(int n);
}

class Push : Function {
    int Friction;

    protected override void SetData(int n) {
        this.Friction = n; 
    }
}

class Lift : Function {
    int Gravity;

    protected override void SetData(int n) {
        this.Gravity= n; 
    }
}
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I would suggest further considering your design, which sounds flawed at this point. If the properties Friction and Gravity are unrelated members of derived classes then it is difficult to understand why you would be dealing with them together.

Perhaps what you need is a new method in your base class, let's call it Update(). Then, both Push and Lift can implement the Update() method respectively to do whatever needs doing to their respective data members.

Now, you can simply call Update() on each Function object:

List<Function> functions;
// ...

foreach (Function f in functions)
{
    f.Update();
}
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Your right i'll redesign it, I seem to be making some big mistakes since i don't know how else to do it. –  BananaPoop Sep 22 '12 at 5:46
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you could also refactor the client code to use Generics, if you could do so. either as a field/property: List Functions {get;set;} or in a method: List GetFunction()

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