Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I found This Post and it looks like what I was needing for an application, my question is how do you revert back to plain http when https is no longer needed? Will it inherently do this based on an action not having the [RequireHttps] annotation?

EDIT: I found a couple posts talking about moving from https to http (here & here). However, I'd still appreciate an answer to the question below.

Alternately, I had debated on having the application open in a new window. Is it a fair assumption that the https will only apply to the new window?

share|improve this question
    
once a user has navigated through requirehttps, if they return to a controller without requirehttps they will still be under the https. – Travis J Jan 24 '12 at 19:31
    
why go back to plain http? Theres a huge security risk there, first off forms auth tokens are transmitted cleartext and session ids can easily be sniffed. Use RequireSsl on your forms auth (if you are using it) but in turn note anywhere that is non-ssl will fail. Run your whole site ssl + understand how easy it is to steal a session from a single logged http packet. – Adam Tuliper - MSFT Jan 24 '12 at 20:59
    
@AdamTuliper I currently don't have/need any authentication. I'm using this for an employment application. Once this is submitted it's pointless to encrypt their browsing any longer. I don't store anything in the session. Our web server is getting up there in age so anything that I can do to ease the load is needed hence if I no longer NEED ssl then why bother? I doubt the encryption is going to bog down the machine, but I'd just assume not use it where it isn't needed since resource wise encryption isn't free. – Jared Jan 24 '12 at 23:00
    
@Jared fair enough sounds like you are on the right track, just wanted to bring up a concern : ) – Adam Tuliper - MSFT Jan 25 '12 at 15:14
up vote 7 down vote accepted

ASP.NET MVC's RequireHttps only goes one way. In the past I have just created my own FilterAttribute implementation to allow travel both ways:

EnsureHttpsAttribute

  public class EnsureHttpsAttribute : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
  {
    public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
      Verify.NotNull(filterContext, "filterContext");
      Verify.True(filterContext.HttpContext.Request.HttpMethod.Equals("GET", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase), "filterContext");

      var request = filterContext.HttpContext.Request;
      if (request.Url != null && !request.IsSecureConnection && !request.IsLocal)
        filterContext.Result = new RedirectResult("https://" + request.Url.Host + request.RawUrl);
    }
  }

EnsureHttpAttribute

  public class EnsureHttpAttribute : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
  {
    public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
      Verify.NotNull(filterContext, "filterContext");
      Verify.True(filterContext.HttpContext.Request.HttpMethod.Equals("GET", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase), "filterContext");

      var request = filterContext.HttpContext.Request;
      if (request.Url != null && request.IsSecureConnection)
        filterContext.Result = new RedirectResult("http://" + request.Url.Host + request.RawUrl);
    }
  }

Almost the same implementation as RequireHttpsAttribute if memory serves; although the above implementation checks if it is a Local request and ignores the switch to HTTPS.

share|improve this answer
    
any thoughts on the second part of my question? If I open the action in a new window am I correct in assuming that https will only be applied to the new window? – Jared Jan 24 '12 at 19:39
    
Assuming relative URLs in the popup window, everything in the new window will remain HTTPS unless you have an absolute URL to explicitly switch back to HTTP. The parent window will remain in http unless you explicitly navigate or redirect to HTTPS. – Chris Baxter Jan 24 '12 at 19:41
    
It's probably not a good idea to redirect POST requests as this might confuse the browser. cf official implementation of the attribute. – nakhli Feb 9 '13 at 23:10
    
@Chaker - Yes, checking for Request.HttpMethod == "Get" is probably a good idea. I will update the example. – Chris Baxter Feb 9 '13 at 23:15
    
What is Verify doing? is it just throwing an Exception if the check is false ? – bartburkhardt Apr 30 '14 at 13:10

I suggest you read this post:

http://www.codehosting.net/blog/BlogEngine/post/More-fiddling-with-MVC3-and-https.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting article and good information. However, I'm not doing any authentication on my site at the moment. Once this happens I could see this being very useful so thanks for the link. – Jared Jan 24 '12 at 19:42
    
I believe from the other answers and posts on SO, that most people end up writing their own custom attribute to handle unique situations. – Travis J Jan 24 '12 at 19:50
    
So far that's what it's looked like. I think what I'll most likely do is have it auto redirect to a non https absolute url once I have them finish the form or open a new window in https and leave their previous browser window alone. – Jared Jan 24 '12 at 23:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.