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I am trying create print method for tuple. I checked out solutions specified by others, all using a helper struct. I don't want to use helper struct. I feel following code is valid but not able get it stright.

#include <iostream>
#include <tr1/tuple>

template<typename tupletype,size_t i>
void print< tupletype ,0>(tupletype t)//error: expected initializer before ‘<’ token
{
    std::cout<<std::tr1::get<0><<" ";
}

template<typename tupletype,size_t i>
void print(tupletype t)
{
    std::cout<<std::tr1::get<i><<" ";// no match for 'operator<<' in 'std::cout << get<-78ul>'(my ide actually hangs here!)
    print<tupletype,i-1>(t);
}

int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {
    std::tr1::tuple<int,float> a(3,5);
    typedef std::tr1::tuple<int,float> tupletype;
    print<tupletype,0>(a);
}
share|improve this question
1  
What kind of errors are you seeing? – mwigdahl Jan 24 '12 at 19:31
    
There's no "template functions", there's function templates, though. – sbi Jan 24 '12 at 19:34
1  
Why do you not want to use a helper struct? – Mankarse Jan 24 '12 at 19:37
    
@Mankarse In my private project I am using a function similar to 'print' that operate on tuple. However that function is already in a deep nested class. I felt helper struct adds one more step of complexity. mwigdahl, sbi - I have updated the question – user602592 Jan 25 '12 at 14:03
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here's one without a specific helper struct:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>

template<std::size_t> struct int2type{};

template<class Tuple, std::size_t I>
void print_imp(Tuple const& t, int2type<I>){
  print_imp(t, int2type<I-1>());
  std::cout << ' ' << std::get<I>(t);
}

template<class Tuple>
void print_imp(Tuple const& t, int2type<0>){
  std::cout << std::get<0>(t);
}

template<class Tuple>
void print(Tuple const& t){
  static std::size_t const size = std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value;
  print_imp(t, int2type<size-1>());
}

Live example on Ideone.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahj, you wrestled this out of overloading! Great find, +1 from me. – sbi Jan 24 '12 at 20:14
1  
@sbi: Overloading is basically what partial specialization would boil down to, and what explicit specialization boils down to during overload resolution and partial ordering. :) – Xeo Jan 24 '12 at 20:17
    
I know this, but I couldn't see a way to make overloading do what was requested. – sbi Jan 24 '12 at 20:30
    
@Xeo that's a great trick, thanks. Have you done any testing as to whether compilers are able to completely optimise away the instantiation of int2type? – Jonny Boy Mar 12 '15 at 8:19

For one, you need to declare the function template before you specialize it:

template<typename tupletype,size_t i>
void print(tupletype t);

However, it still wouldn't work, because you cannot partially specialize function templates — and what you are trying to do is a partial specialization.

So the only way to do what you want to do is to fall back on class template partial specialization:

template<typename tupletype,size_t i>
struct printer;

template<typename tupletype>
struct printer< tupletype ,0> {
  static void print(tupletype t)
  {
    std::cout<<std::tr1::get<0>(t)<<" ";
  }
};

template<typename tupletype,size_t i>
struct printer {
  static void print(tupletype t)
  {
    std::cout<<std::tr1::get<i>(t)<<" ";
    printer<tupletype,i-1>::print(t);
  }
};

template<typename tupletype,size_t i>
void print(tupletype t)
{
  printer<tupletype,i>::print(t);
}

Why would you not want to do that?

share|improve this answer
    
As a note, you can partially specialize function templates in C++11 – Paul Fultz II Jan 24 '12 at 19:56
5  
@Paul no, you can't. That didn't change. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 24 '12 at 20:06
    
Yea, thats true, you can NOT partial specialize function templates in C++11. Sorry about that, I was confusing that with default template parameters(which you can use in C++11 on functions just like with classes) – Paul Fultz II Jan 25 '12 at 1:29

This code is not valid. You cannot partially specialise function templates, which is required for what you want to do. You really need a helper struct.

share|improve this answer

You have a couple of problems.

For one you need to declare the template before you specialize.

For another you have forgotten to pass the tupletype instance to ::get

However, the largest is that you are trying to partially specialize a function template, which is not allowed by the standard (search SO or google for elaboration on why).

Now to solve (somewhat) what you asked for:

Note that to create generally useful compile-time recursion, you need to template the input object (ie: your tupletype) and an index which will be used to recursively iterate over the elements in the input. Template recursion requires partial specialization to define the exit condition. You cannot do this with function templates, but you can do it with classes - hence, use a struct.

Now, in the specific sense, you can actually achieve what you want without using structs. To do this you need to avoid partial specialization... therefore we need to fully specialize. (Before I get down-voted - I completely acknowledge that this solution is not very useful in the general sense - but the OP wanted to avoid structs, so I did!)

By making the function only take a specific tupletype, we can have only a single template parameter - the index. We can therefore fully specialize the function template to get our exit condition:

#include <iostream>
#include <tr1/tuple>

typedef std::tr1::tuple<int,float> tupletype;

template<size_t i>
void print(tupletype t)
{
    std::cout << std::tr1::get<i>(t) << " ";
    print<i-1>(t);
}

template<>
void print<0>(tupletype t)
{
    std::cout << std::tr1::get<0>(t) << " ";
}

int main()
{
    tupletype a(3,5);

    print<1>(a);
}
share|improve this answer
    
"specialization" is not necessarily "partial specialization". – sbi Jan 24 '12 at 19:45

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