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I've always accessed related data on different tables by joins. This was fast and good for small to moderate sized databases. The problem is that when the tables that you are joining to might have a million rows, it makes sense to me to just store the index (the primary key) in a text field, and just find the related data that way.

Traditionally, for example,

Say you have:

[Aliens]

AlienID (Primary Key)
Name
AlienDynamicPropertyID (Foreign Key, Indexed)

[AlienDynamicProperty]

AlienDynamicPropertyID (Primary Key)
AlienID (Indexed)
PropertyName
PropertyValue

Say I have about a hundred thousand aliens in the Aliens table, and each alien had about 5-15 dynamic properties. That would make the AlienDynamicProperty table a million rows of data.

To get all the dynamic properties for all aliens, I would do something like this.

select 
    a.[Name], b.[PropertyName], b.[PropertyValue] 
from Aliens a 
inner join AlienDynamicProperty b on a.[AlienID] = b.[AlienID] 
where a.[AlienID] = 376851

But I'm wondering whether if it would be better to do it this way

Instead have:

[Aliens]

AlienID (Primary Key)
Name
AlienDynamicPropertyIDs (text separated by |)

[AlienDynamicProperty]

AlienDynamicPropertyID (Primary Key)
PropertyName
PropertyValue

2 queries have to be run.

myIDs = runquery("select Name, AlienDynamicPropertyIDs where AlienID = 376851");
querypart = replace(myIDs, "|", " or AlienDynamicProperty ID = ");
mydataset = getdataset("select PropertyName, PropertyValue from AlienDynamicProperty where AlienDynamicPropertyID = " + querypart;

To me, that would seem like a more efficient way to go instead of joining to a table with million rows of data. But maybe the join will be no problem and having to run 2 queries after string manipulation would be more taxing on the server? I would definitely appreciate some feedback. Thanks in advance!

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2  
A join like the one you are describing should handle trillions of rows with no sweat if you have properly indexed the FK. –  HLGEM Jan 24 '12 at 19:46
    
HLGLEM, thanks. This was 50% of the other info I was looking for. How efficient the joins were to a table with million plus rows of data. Apparently very efficient from what you are saying. Knowing this, I know I never have to wonder about this path again. :) –  Lucidmike78 Jan 24 '12 at 20:08
    
@HLGEM totally agree. This is exactly what databases are designed to do. As a developer, you shouldn't be thinking about how to make the work easier on the database, because usually you will just end up making the work harder. Focus more on how to describe what you actually want with a clean SQL query, and let the database figure out how to execute it. Of course, proper indexing is required, but assuming that indexing is in place, this should be no problem. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Jan 24 '12 at 20:15
    
Remember FKs do not index automatically. You need to create the indexes. –  HLGEM Jan 24 '12 at 22:04

4 Answers 4

Storing multiple values in one field is one of the big no noes of relational databases.

It violates the first normal form and means that if you need to query on this field you are going to have problems.

In order to fetch by values or query values in a field storing delimited values you need to parse and convert the values. This will almost certainly have a much higher overhead than joins.

If you have performance issues, consider denormalizing the structure - so all the data you need exists in one table, even if duplication will occur. This of course has other issues with inserts, updates and deletes, but is the best option to speed up reads.

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Short answer: Absolutely no no no no. Do not even think about using that mechanism. The minute you do this you endanger your life from all other programmers who touch/have to tap into your database. You might as well run and hide now, because if you seperate values via | or , or any character you are simply asking for problems in the future.

If you are having issues with speed of data coming back, provide us with the indexes and the SQL queries and we may be able to help optimize the plans being used. But to denormalize the table and use | or ,'s or any character to seperate a many side relationship using a character delimiter is a really bad idea.

@JoshG, you want to know why. Here is why. I want you to use that database schema and create a multi select parameter with all of those AlienDynamicProperties how on earth are you going to solve that? O wait you can by simply parsing it with something like this:

WHILE @TheID IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
IF CHARINDEX('^,^', @CurrentRow) > 0
   BEGIN
      WHILE CHARINDEX('^,^', @CurrentRow) > 0
         BEGIN
           SELECT @SingleLLCategory = (SELECT LEFT(@CurrentRow, CHARINDEX('^,^', @CurrentRow)-1))
            IF LEN(@SingleLLCategory) > 1 AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM #temp2 WHERE LLCategory = @SingleLLCategory)
            BEGIN
           INSERT INTO #temp2(TheID, LLCategory) VALUES(@TheID, @SingleLLCategory)
           --PRINT '1' + ' ' + @SingleLLCategory + ' ' + CAST (@Count AS VARCHAR(10))
            END

           --SET @CurrentRow = (SELECT RIGHT(@CurrentRow, CHARINDEX(',', @CurrentRow)-2 ))
           SET @CurrentRow = (SELECT RIGHT(@CurrentRow, LEN(@CurrentRow) - CHARINDEX('^,^', @CurrentRow)-2))

         END
      --dont forget the last part of currentrow
      IF LEN(@CurrentRow) > 0
         BEGIN
           SELECT @SingleLLCategory = (SELECT @CurrentRow)
            IF LEN(@SingleLLCategory) > 1 AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM #temp2 WHERE LLCategory = @SingleLLCategory)
            BEGIN
           INSERT INTO #temp2(TheID, LLCategory) VALUES(@TheID, @SingleLLCategory)
           --PRINT '2' + ' ' + @SingleLLCategory + ' ' + CAST (@Count AS VARCHAR(10))
            END
         END
      END
ELSE
    BEGIN
       SELECT @SingleLLCategory = (SELECT @CurrentRow)
            IF LEN(@SingleLLCategory) > 1 AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM #temp2 WHERE LLCategory = @SingleLLCategory)
            BEGIN
           INSERT INTO #temp2(TheID, LLCategory) VALUES(@TheID, @SingleLLCategory)
            --PRINT '3' + ' ' + @SingleLLCategory + ' ' + CAST (@Count AS VARCHAR(10))
            END
    END

    -- Delete the row, we are finished processing it.
    DELETE #t2 WHERE TheID = @TheID

    --now snatch the next row
    SET @TheID = (SELECT DISTINCT TOP 1 TheID FROM #t2)

    SET @CurrentRow = (SELECT DISTINCT TOP 1 LLCategory
                   FROM #t2 WHERE TheID = @TheID)

    SET @Count = (SELECT @Count+1)
END

If parsing a file isn't enough reason, what happens when I ask you to join the properties of the AlienDynamic column into a table that gives you additional meta data about each property given a PK FK combination? How exactly do you plan to join the tables now? Common sense on this - do not do it at all costs. This is not C# or C++ this is data. The entire concept of seperation of key data by a character violates normal form and is not only frowned upon, it will haunt you forever.

If you think you've solved a certain problem using this mechanism, you might have, but you have created many additional problems with this type of setup. You introduce issues that creep up fairly quickly and you might wash your hands of the problem - but someone somewhere down the road has to use your schema, and they will always remember you as the dirty lil coder

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Agreed, but we need some motivation as to why –  Amish Programmer Jan 24 '12 at 19:38
    
Fear for ones life is indeed a great motivator. It is not, however, a technical reason... –  Oded Jan 24 '12 at 19:39
1  
Thanks for your feedback. Yes, I agree that long term, this is a terrible implementation and I shouldn't start off on the wrong foot. You've scared me straight. –  Lucidmike78 Jan 24 '12 at 19:51
    
I hope I did :). Only from prior experience can I say this. The best thing is when someone else has experienced this. I've had people do this and it has bitten us big time. –  JonH Jan 24 '12 at 20:22

If you believe your fields are dynamic enough to warrant a non-fixed structure, I'd recommend using an XML document for your properties. You can query the individual values with .value, or turn the entire structure into a rowset with .nodes. XML fields can be indexed for performance as well.

You could also look at setting fixed columns for your properties, but use sparse columns.

Before setting out on any of these, you should probably examine your dynamic properties to determine just how dynamic they are, and from there formulate a plan to proceed. 5-15 dynamic properties isn't necessarily all that much.

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1  
Agree EAV tables are a design smell all on their own. Perhaps the OP needs to hire someone who is experienced in database design rather than making such poor choices due to thinking like an application programmer and not a database programmer. –  HLGEM Jan 24 '12 at 19:49
    
I think XML is definitely the way to go in this situation. Not the hack implementation to improve performance for single use. Thanks for your response. –  Lucidmike78 Jan 24 '12 at 19:54
    
@HLGEM Granted this is SQL Server (and let's hope it's at least 2005) so the XML data type would likely be a good fit here, but I don't think the table structure is such a "poor" choice if one is working with a database that does not support such a feature but still has a need to store truly dynamic data in a database. Of course, the suggestion to store multiple primary key IDs in a single text field is terrible. Ah, perhaps that's what you were referring to... –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Jan 24 '12 at 20:09

You really want to return all one million rows of data? That's going to take some time.

I would try running a very simply query on the AlienDynamicProperty table by itself (no join to Alien) just to get a benchmark for how fast those records will be returned. However long it takes for those records to return, that's probably the best case scenario that you can hope for, unless you are doing some kind of filtering.

Without knowing more about the query, my gut reaction is to structure the tables like this:

[Aliens]
AlienID (Primary Key)
Name

[AlienDynamicProperty]
AlienDynamicPropertyID (Primary Key)
PropertyName

[AlienDynamicPropertyValue]
AlienDynamicPropertyValueID (Primary Key)
AlienID (Foreign Key to Aliens table)
AlienDynamicPropertyID (ForeignKey to AlienDynamicProperty table)
PropertyValue
(Unique Key on AlienID, AlienDynamicPropertyID)

The advantage here is that I've broken the AlienDynamicProperty table into an AlienDynamicProperty and AlienDynamicPropertyValue table. The AlienDynamicProperty table just contains the 15 different kind of dynamic properties that can be assigned to an alien. This makes it easier to query for only a specific property across a set of aliens, rather than having to retrieve all of the properties.

I don't know if that helps your specific situation at all, though.

IF you have some knowledge about optimizing tables, then you could consider making the unique key on (AlienID, AlienDynamicPropertyID) into a clustered index, which might improve performance for selects.

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