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I am attempting to create a jQuery plugin for my own use that can be used to setup a handler for jQuery mobile dialogs using a single command as such: $('#dialog').setup_dialog({ callback: callback_function });

However, my handler has a rather obvious memory leak due to closures in it:

$.fn.setup_dialog = function( options ) {
    var settings = $.extend({
        callback : 0
    }, options);
    var that = this;

    return this.live('pagebeforeshow', function(event, ui) {
        console.log("outside");
        $('form', that).submit( function(e) {
            var $inputs = $('form :input', that); // get all form inputs

            var values = {};
            $inputs.each(function() {
                values[this.name] = $(this).val();
            });

            that.dialog('close');

            if ( settings.callback && typeof(settings.callback) === "function" ) {
                $('#'+ui.prevPage[0].id).live('pagebeforeshow', function() {
                    settings.callback(values, that);
                    console.log("inside");
                });
            }

            return e.preventDefault();
        });
    });
}; /* setup_dialog */

If you ran the above code, you would see "inside" and "outside" printed first once, then three times (twice from a single submit), then six times (three times from a single submit), etc.

The intent of the code is to attach an event handler to the jQuery Mobile dialog when it comes up that will catch form submission, collect all the form values, and then pass them to a callback function that will modify the original page (that launched the dialog).

Note that because of the way jQuery Mobile uses AJAX to switch between pages, I need to use .live to bind the events (.bind or .one won't work).

Any ideas how I can avoid the events accumulating (and maybe clean up the code a bit as well)?

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Not that it really matters because you aren't doing anything with the return value from the submit event handler but if you return e.preventDefault() it doesn't actually return anything. –  Jasper Jan 24 '12 at 20:16

2 Answers 2

You are binding event handlers inside of other event handlers. And the outer event handlers are not unique events (they occur more than once) which means that your inner event handlers are being bound more than once.

A good fix is to remove the submit event handler from the pagebeforeshow event handler and place it in a pagecreate or pageinit event handler (these are unique and will only run once per dialog).

If you want to keep your current logic then you can just unbind event handlers when they run, so you won't be stacking multiple event handlers that do the same thing:

$.fn.setup_dialog = function( options ) {
    var settings = $.extend({
        callback : 0
    }, options);
    var that = this;

    return this.live('pagebeforeshow', function(event, ui) {
        console.log("outside");
        $('form', that).submit( function(e) {
            var $inputs = $('form :input', that); // get all form inputs

            var values = {};
            $inputs.each(function() {
                values[this.name] = $(this).val();
            });

            that.dialog('close');

            if ( settings.callback && typeof(settings.callback) === "function" ) {
                $('#'+ui.prevPage[0].id).live('pagebeforeshow', function() {
                    settings.callback(values, that);
                    console.log("inside");

                    $(this).die('pagebeforeshow');//NEW, unbind the pagebeforeshow event handler for this element
                                                  //since it will be bound the next time the dialog is shown anyway
                });
            }

            $(this).die('submit');//NEW, unbind the submit event handler for this form 
                                  //since it will be bound the next time the dialog is shown anyway

            return e.preventDefault();
        });
    });
}; /* setup_dialog */

Here is the documentation for .die(): http://api.jquery.com/die/

share|improve this answer
    
I had tried .die() previously, as well as with your code, and I'm still having the same issue, unfortunately. Of note: I commented out the entire .submit() event handler and "outside" was still accumulating in my console (1, 3, 6, etc.). Perhaps I should note that I have .setup_dialog() in <script> tags at the bottom of the respective dialog page. –  dak Jan 24 '12 at 20:27
    
You should design your plugin so that it only has to be called once on an element. At the moment it appears that if you only call .setup_dialog() once (say on document.ready) it will work fine (with the .die()s). Every time you call .setup_dialog() you are binding another event to the element on which you are calling it. Otherwise you need to add $(this).die('pagebeforeshow'); to the pagebeforeshow event handler (the one that logs the outer message). –  Jasper Jan 24 '12 at 20:50
    
How about replacing $(this).die('submit'); with $('form', that).die('submit') because that is set to this so you should be calling .die() on the exact same selection. You can do the same thing for the pagebeforeshow event handler (inside), save a reference to the exact same element. Just inside the if statement that checks for a callback function place this: var $innerThis = $('#'+ui.prevPage[0].id); $innerThis.live(... and then inside that callback function add: $innerThis.die('pagebeforeshow'); –  Jasper Jan 24 '12 at 21:37
    
the best way I found to get .die() to work was actually to call chain call it, for example: $('#'+ui.prevPage[0].id).die().live('pagebeforeshow', function() { –  dak Jan 24 '12 at 23:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution appears to be the following:

$.fn.setup_dialog = function( options ) {
    var settings = $.extend({
        callback : 0
    }, options);
    var that = this; var values = {}; var submitted = 0;

    this.on('pageinit', function(event, ui) {
        $('form', that).submit(function(e) {
            var $inputs = $('form :input', that); // get all form inputs
            submitted = 1;

            $inputs.each(function() {
                values[this.name] = $(this).val();
            });

            that.dialog('close');

            return e.preventDefault();
        });

        $('.cancel-button', that).click(function() {
            submitted = 0;
        });
    });

    this.on('pagebeforehide', function(event, ui) {
        if ( submitted && settings.callback && typeof(settings.callback) === "function" ) {
            settings.callback(values, that);
        }
    });
}; /* setup_dialog */

There were multiple ways to do this, including creating a closure and calling $('#'+ui.prevPage[0].id).die().live('pagebeforeshow', function() {

Not convinced this is the nicest solution though, so I'd love to hear some better ideas.

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