Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there a better way to express (\(a, b) -> a < b) with function composition? I feel like I'm missing something and experimenting with curry only confused me more.

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

curry is the wrong thing to use here; it turns a function operating on tuples into a curried function. You want the opposite, which is uncurry:

uncurry :: (a -> b -> c) -> (a, b) -> c

In this case, it's uncurry (<).

(Another useful source for combinators useful in writing functions on tuples is Control.Arrow; since (->) is an instance of Arrow, you can read a b c as b -> c.)

share|improve this answer

Looking at the types is the best way in Haskell to get the first idea, what any function does:

curry :: ((a, b) -> c) -> a -> b -> c
uncurry :: (a -> b -> c) -> (a, b) -> c

curry: function of pair → curried function (it curries a function).

uncurry: curried function → function of pair.

Haskell Wiki page on currying has small exercises at the end of the page:

  • Simplify curry id
  • Simplify uncurry const
  • Express snd using curry or uncurry and other basic Prelude functions and without lambdas
  • Write the function \(x,y) -> (y,x) without lambda and with only Prelude functions

Try to solve these exercises right now, they will give you a massive insight into Haskell type system and function application.

There are several interesting applications of uncurry, try to pass different arguments to functions below and see what they do:

uncurry (.) :: (b -> c, a -> b) -> a -> c
uncurry (flip .) :: (b -> a -> b1 -> c, b) -> b1 -> a -> c
uncurry (flip (.)) :: (a -> b, b -> c) -> a -> c
uncurry ($) :: (b -> c, b) -> c
uncurry (flip ($)) :: (a, a -> c) -> c

-- uncurry (,) is an identity function for pairs
uncurry (,) :: (a, b) -> (a, b)
uncurry (,) (1,2) -- returns (1,2)
uncurry uncurry :: (a -> b -> c, (a, b)) -> c
uncurry uncurry ((+), (2, 3)) -- returns 5

-- curry . uncurry and uncurry . curry are identity functions
curry . uncurry :: (a -> b -> c) -> (a -> b -> c)
(curry . uncurry) (+) 2 3 -- returns 5
uncurry . curry :: ((a, b) -> c) -> ((a, b) -> c)
(uncurry . curry) fst (2,3) -- returns 2

-- pair -> triple
uncurry (,,) :: (a, b) -> c -> (a, b, c)
uncurry (,,) (1,2) 3 -- returns (1,2,3)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.