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I am trying to access a static field of the struct which I already defined as public. However, I still got "inaccessible due to its protection level" Can anyone help me?

public class Program
{
    public struct AT_CMD
    {
        static int x = 7;
       static  byte[] cmd_mode = new byte[3] { 0x2B, 0x2B, 0x2B };
       static  byte[] end_device_assoc = new byte[4] { 0x41, 0x54, 0x41, 0x31 };
      //should be 0 for end device, default is 0
       static  byte[] data_rate = new byte[4] { 0x41, 0x54, 0x42, 0x44 }; //3 for 9600, 5 for 38400
       static  byte[] channel = new byte[4] { 0x41, 0x54, 0x43, 0x48 }; //0x0B-0x1A
       static  byte[] Dest_addr_high = new byte[4] { 0x41, 0x54, 0x44, 0x48 }; //0 FOR 16bit
       static  byte[] Dest_addr_low = new byte[4] { 0x41, 0x54, 0x44, 0x4C };
       static  byte[] my_addr = new byte[4] { 0x41, 0x54, 0x4D, 0x59 }; // 0-0xFFFF
       static  byte[] carriage_return = new byte[1] { 0x0D };
   }  

    static void Main()
    {
        int y = AT_CMD.x;
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

By default fields are private. Add the most limiting modifier that will still allow you to work with the structure.

public struct AT_CMD
{
    public static int x = 7;
}  

static void Main()
{
    int y = AT_CMD.x;
}
share|improve this answer

Change it to:

  public struct AT_CMD
  {
        public static int x = 7;

        // ...
  }  

Just making a struct public doesn't affect its members, the members of the struct will be private by default unless you specify otherwise.

UPDATE: Addressing the confusion on default access, internal is the default access for the struct or class itself if declared at the namespace level (not nested in another class/struct):

Classes and structs that are declared directly within a namespace (in other words, that are not nested within other classes or structs) can be either public or internal. Internal is the default if no access modifier is specified.

Whereas, the fields in a class or struct always default to private:

The access level for class members and struct members, including nested classes and structs, is private by default.

From the MSDN.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot, so even it's static, still it's private...right? –  fiftyplus Jan 24 '12 at 20:20
    
@gpakillsme: No, technically the default is internal, though the distinction might not be important for your case. See here for more information. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 24 '12 at 20:27
1  
@BlueRaja: Actually, internal is the default for a non-nested struct/class itself (that is, struct AT_CMD is same as internal struct AT_CMD if non-nested). The default for class/struct members is private. –  James Michael Hare Jan 24 '12 at 20:32
    
@James: Whoops! You're correct, +1 –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 24 '12 at 20:37
    
@BlueRaja: No worries :-) the fact that the default for some things change based on scope but not others can be a wee bit confusing. –  James Michael Hare Jan 24 '12 at 20:44

The struct is public, but the members are not.

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Declare them like this:

public static  byte[] cmd_mode = new byte[3] { 0x2B, 0x2B, 0x2B };

However, it looks as though you mean these to be constants. In that case, they should really be declared like this:

public static readonly IEnumerable<byte> cmd_mod = new byte[3] { 0x2B, 0x2B, 0x2B };
share|improve this answer
    
I'd recommend a ReadOnlyCollection<T> here, if for nothing else but clarity. –  Grant Thomas Jan 24 '12 at 20:20
    
@Mr. Disappointment: ReadOnlyCollection<T> is rarely used in practice - for whatever reason, IEnumerable<T> is almost always preferred (probably because it doesn't require a copy). That being said, IEnumerable<T> doesn't have an indexer while ReadOnlyCollection<T> does, so if that is important, ReadOnlyCollection<T> may be your only choice. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 24 '12 at 20:25

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