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I just started to learn C programming. In my book there is this piece of code:

/*Code Start*/
/*This code is use to find the simple interest*/

main ()
{
int p, n;
float r, si;

p = 1000;
n = 3;
r = 8.5;

si= p*n*r/100;
printf("%f", si);

}

/*Code end*/

The output i got was " 255.000000 "

I though i'll modify it with scanf function so i wrote this:

/*Code Start*/

main ()
{
int p, n;
float r, si;

printf("Enter value for p: \n");
scanf("%d", &p);
printf("Enter value for n: \n\n");
scanf("%d", &n);
printf("Enter valuse for r: \n\n");
scanf("%d", &r);

si= p*n*r/100;

printf("\nYour Simple Interest is %f\n\n", si);
}

/*Code End*/

No matter what values i give to p,n,r the answer i get is always 0.000000..
I also tried giving the values, p=1000, n=3, r=8.5 but still i get 0.000000..

share|improve this question
2  
Just remember this: %d for int ,%f for float ,%e for double ,%c for char , %s for strings. –  César Bustíos Jan 24 '12 at 21:09
3  
Compile with gcc -Wall. By enabling the warnings, you will be able to pinpoint the four problems with this code. The fixes you need to apply are obvious from the warning messages. –  Alex Reynolds Jan 24 '12 at 21:17
1  
Your book has main without a prototype, that is doesn't specify a return value and has an empty parameter list? This looks quite outdated. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 24 '12 at 21:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Firstly, your main problem: The %d specifier is only for integers, not floats or doubles. Use %f for floats.

In addition, the main should return an int, this will do:

int main() {
    /* your code */
    return 0;
}

Finally, I would recommend you make better use of white-space as it will vastly help with readability once you start making larger programs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. It worked. Can you please explain what did you mean by main should return an int ? What does this main() mean ? Why should we add int before it ? and what can we put in the parentheses ? –  912M0FR34K Jan 24 '12 at 21:47
    
@912M0FR34K: The main function is the entry point for the program, called by the execution environment. The language specification requires main to return an int value. The two standard signatures for main are int main(void) and int main(int argc, char **argv). Whenever you see main() in your book, replace it with int main(void). Out of curiousity, what book are you using? –  John Bode Jan 24 '12 at 22:02
    
@JhonBode: Thank you again. I am using "Programming in ANSI - E Balagurusamy" . If you think its not good, which book will you suggest ? I am new to programming –  912M0FR34K Jan 24 '12 at 22:20
    
@John-Bode:Thank you again. I am using "Programming in ANSI - E Balagurusamy" . If you think its not good, which book will you suggest ? I am new to programming –  912M0FR34K Jan 24 '12 at 22:20
    
Maybe some classic like B.Kernighan, D.Ritchie-,,The C Programming Language''? –  Wookie88 Jan 24 '12 at 22:40

Change the specifier in scanf. You're using %d instead of %f:

scanf("%f", &r);
        ^
  • First side note: the code looks kind of bad (no return type for main ?!). Are you sure it's a good book ?
  • Second side note: using floats today is kind of pointless. Maybe you should use doubles ?
share|improve this answer
    
There are some fields where float still makes sense, for example in graphics or games, often double precision is not required but float is way faster. –  ouah Jan 24 '12 at 21:10
    
@ouah Yes, I think that's quite sensible. Still, I feel floats are being overused. –  cnicutar Jan 24 '12 at 21:11
    
Thank you. It worked. Can you please explain what did you mean by main should return an int ? What does this main() mean ? Why should we add int before it ? and what can we put in the parentheses ? What book would you suggest for me to learn C ? i am a beginner and this is my first language. –  912M0FR34K Jan 24 '12 at 21:48

Use %f conversion specification to read a float:

scanf("%f", &r);

%d means it reads a decimal integer and not a float.

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r is a float, but you're reading it in using %d as a scanf specifier, which expects an int.

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The real culprit in your code is the line scanf("**%d**", &r). %d is the format specifier for integer value, as you declared r as float then use %f instead of %d.

i.e. scanf("%f", &r)

share|improve this answer
    
Correct, but why rehash what the other 4 answers said 3 years later? –  namezero Apr 26 at 10:01

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