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As far as I can see, a pointer to structure can be used. But I am wondering, is there any more efficient or elegant way to do that? At least when a structure is being used, it is not easy to see what are the parameters used by the function.

Thanks for any insightful answer.

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7  
Can you elaborate on this? What do you mean by "pass parameters to a function in another thread?" –  templatetypedef Jan 24 '12 at 21:12
1  
What do you want to do? A function definition isn't on one thread or another, it can be run on any thread; one thing that presents a threading issue is if it's modifying data on one thread that's also being modified by another. You can access the data structure that's being touched by another thread, but you have to know the exact safe-guards necessary to properly access and modify it; it'd be better to wrap up the functionality in a function so you don't have to remember the proper safeguards, or worry about breaking them. –  leetNightshade Jan 24 '12 at 21:24
1  
c++ (before c++11) doesn't know about threads. What multithread system are you using? What do you mean by "pass parameters to a function"? –  Alessandro Pezzato Jan 24 '12 at 21:26
    
You cannot call, or return from, a function 'in another thread'. All you can do is signal the other thread that there is some data in some place that can be accessed, hence the usual reliance on struct pointers or instance references - something that can be easily queued, or otherwise communicated to the thread, without extended locking, can carry input/output/status etc. data and can instruct the thread to do something with it, eg. call some function with the data. If you use meaningful member names, it's usually fairly clear what's going on. –  Martin James Jan 24 '12 at 23:28
    
Say we have only one thread A, we can call a function foo(int bar1, int bar2); directly in this thread. Now think about another thread B, if you want to call foo there but you need bar1, bar2 passed in from thread A, what do you do? My question was how to EFFICIENTLY do it? Thread safe is another thing that we can figure out later. –  echo Jan 25 '12 at 1:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a small example, that uses WIN32 API:

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct PARAMS
{
    int i;
    char* msg;
};

DWORD WINAPI myThread(void* parameter)
{
    PARAMS* params = (PARAMS*)parameter;
    printf("Received parameters: i = %d, msg = '%s'\n", params->i, params->msg);
    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char msg[] = "Hi there.";
    PARAMS params;
    params.i = 1;
    params.msg = msg;

    HANDLE threadHandle = CreateThread(NULL, 0, myThread, &params, 0, NULL);
    WaitForSingleObject(threadHandle, INFINITE);

    return 0;
}

You say, that "it is not easy to see what are the parameters used by the function". Well it depends on situation. If you don't consider it "elegant" enough, you should leave some helpful comment there at least... if you are using good naming and trying to write code, that is self-documenting, then using of structure will be just fine.

Here's an example of wrapping CreateThread so that programmer that uses your code doesn't have to know that you are using some structure:

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>

class MyWrapper
{
private:
    struct PARAMS
    {
        int i;
        char* msg;
    };

    static DWORD WINAPI myThread(void* parameter)
    {
        PARAMS* params = (PARAMS*)parameter;
        printf("Received parameters: i = %d, msg = '%s'\n", params->i, params->msg);
        delete params;
        return 0;
    }

public:
    HANDLE createThread(int i, char* msg)
    {
        PARAMS* params = new PARAMS;
        params->i = i;
        params->msg = msg;

        return CreateThread(NULL, 0, MyWrapper::myThread, params, 0, NULL);
    }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    MyWrapper mw;
    char msg[] = "Hi there.";

    HANDLE threadHandle = mw.createThread(1, msg);
    WaitForSingleObject(threadHandle, INFINITE);

    return 0;
}
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I think you know what I am talking about. :) Using CreateThread means for each function call I need to create a thread, that is not good for performance. Secondly, if void* parameters is used, we cannot check lot of things during compile time, for example, if exact number of parameters are passed in, so it's not elegant either. –  echo Jan 25 '12 at 1:17
    
@echo: CreateThread function should not be used to realize a function call, it creates a new thread on purpose. Usually it is used to perform some task in parallel, which improves performance. if void* parameters is used, we cannot check lot of things during compile time, for example, if exact number of parameters are passed in - If it's meant to be used by other people (library, API...), you should create wrapper that will "hide" your internal implementation. –  LihO Jan 25 '12 at 10:53

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