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I'm building a perl application to archive simple web pages (i.e. static pages with no query strings involved). I'd like to write tests to verify the functionality of the module that will be accessing the remote files. To make the tests self-reliant, I'm looking for a simple, self-contained web server that the test scripts can use locally.

Below is an example which outlines what I'm trying to do. I've cut it down to a minimum with the following directory structure:

./MirrorPage.pm
./t/001_get_url.t
./t/test-docroot/test-1.json

Contents of "./MirrorPage.pm":

package MirrorPage;

use Moose;
use LWP::Simple;
use namespace::autoclean;

sub get_url {

    my ($self, $url_to_get) = @_;

    ### grab the contents of the url
    my $url_data = get($url_to_get);

    ### return the contents.
    return $url_data;

}

__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;

1;

Contents of "./t/001_get_url.t":

#!/usr/bin/perl 

use Modern::Perl;
use Test::More;
use MirrorPage;

    ### Start test www server on port 8123 here ###

my $t = new_ok('MirrorPage', undef, 'Create MirrorPage');

is(
    $t->get_url("http://localhost:8123/test-1.json"), 
    '{ testkey: "testvalue" }',
    "Verify the data."
);

    ### Kill test www server here ###

done_testing();

Contents of "./t/test-docroot/test-1.json":

{ testkey: "testvalue" }

The goal is to start and kill a self-contained web server at the corresponding comment locations in "./t/001_get_url.t". The web server needs to serve the contents of the "./t/test-docroot" directory as its document root.

Given all that: What is the best/simplest way to setup a self-contained web server to provide static files for testing in perl?

share|improve this question
    
A quick follow up. I've marked the answer by "ruz" as accepted because it does exactly what I need for this specific case with the least amount of fuss. The answer by "Chris J" about using MockObject offers a much more generalized solution. It's worth checking out for more complex tests that require something beyond a web server. –  Alan W. Smith Jan 25 '12 at 16:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

LWP can fetch files, so you can rewrite $url_to_get from http://... to file://....

share|improve this answer
    
Holy Cow! So simple. So awesome. –  Alan W. Smith Jan 24 '12 at 22:54

I would mock the HTTP call near the top of your .t file (if you're only wanting to test MirrorPage.pm):

my $mock = new Test::MockObject();
$mock->fake_module( 'LWP::Simple', get => sub { return '{ testkey: "testvalue" }' } );
share|improve this answer
    
I had to make a few changes to get this to work. -- First: change ... sub { return ... to ... sub ($) { return ... in order to avoid a warning about a Prototype mismatch. -- Second, I had to change use LWP::Simple; to use LWP::Simple ( ); and then my $url_data = get($url_to_get); to my $url_data = LWP::Simple::get($url_to_get);. Otherwise, the mock object wouldn't override LWP::Simple's "get" in the tests. Once those were in place, this worked nicely. –  Alan W. Smith Jan 24 '12 at 22:49

Perhaps:

At the top, fork and do a simple static file server using HTTP::Server::Simple::Static, then at the bottom terminate the child process.

share|improve this answer
    
I was moving along these sames lines. I cross posted an answer that uses the same idea but with Net::HTTPServer instead. –  Alan W. Smith Jan 24 '12 at 22:38

I can highly recommend Mojolicious as a great way to produce a test server for a client. Since Mojolicious simply maps a URL into a subroutine call, it's very easy to have very fine control over what the server does, and therefore you can easily test things like "does my client fail properly if the server returns a bad response/bad content/times out". And since it is very simple to set up and tear down a server, a little cleverness with fork() makes it possible to have the test and the server setup live in the same test file.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Joe. Using straight LWP calls to the file:// system is working for my current test. I'll dig into this the next time I need to do something though. Love the idea that you can do things like return time outs and bad content. I look forward to playing with it. –  Alan W. Smith Feb 18 '12 at 1:53

Here's what I've come up with using Net::HTTPServer. Based on the idea that "It’s OK to Ask and Answer Your Own Questions", I'm posting it here for comment/consideration. What I've done is the following:

First, create a new module at: "./t/TestServer.pm". The contents of this file are:

package TestServer;

use Moose;
use Net::HTTPServer;
use namespace::autoclean;

has 'server' => (
    is => "rw",
    isa => "Net::HTTPServer",
    default => sub { 
        Net::HTTPServer->new (
            port => 8123,
            docroot => "t/test-docroot"
        )
    }, 
);


sub BUILD {

    my $self = shift;

    ### Spin up the server.
    $self->server->Start();
    $self->server->Process();

}

### Close up the Moose package.
__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;

1;

Then, update the test "./t/001_get_url.t" file to use it via a fork:

#!/usr/bin/perl 

use Modern::Perl;
use Test::More;
use MirrorPage;

### Fork for the server
my $pid = fork();

### Parent process. Holds the tests.
if($pid) {

    ### Make sure the server has a moment to startup
    sleep(2);

    my $t = new_ok('MirrorPage', undef, 'Create MirrorPage');

    is(
        $t->get_url("http://localhost:8123/test-1.json"), 
        '{ testkey: "testvalue" }',
        "Verify the data."
    );  
}

### Child process. Holds the server.
elsif(defined($pid)) {

    use lib "t/";
    use TestServer;

    my $svr = TestServer->new();

    exit; # Should never get here.

}

### Error out if necessary.
else {
    die "Can not fork child process.";
}


### Kill the server fork.
kill 1, $pid;

done_testing();

This is working well for me.

share|improve this answer
    
My recommendation for answering your own questions, is to wait until the next day to post the answer. –  Brad Gilbert Jan 25 '12 at 14:16
    
I can see that. I've also seen folks who said to do it immediately. I took the middle route and waited until there were a few other answers (which came in quite quickly). I also thought about putting my proposed solution directly in the question and asking for feed back. I've done that before, but it also feels weird. Next time I have one like this, I'll give the next day thing a shot. –  Alan W. Smith Jan 25 '12 at 16:12

Although it's OS specific, I'm sure Apache is your answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the OP is wanting to make this happen automatically as part of the unit tests for a module. Depending on Apache is a bit of a non-starter, let alone getting it configured, starting and stopping it. –  hochgurgler Jan 24 '12 at 21:51
    
I'm actually trying to avoid using apache. I've already got several virtual hosts for web development setup on my machine. I don't want to have to setup and tear down more just to provide test files. Plus that's not portable over to other machines without also setting their apache instances up. –  Alan W. Smith Jan 24 '12 at 21:59
    
Valid point; I'd consider Mondobill's resolution then. –  Hikalea Jan 24 '12 at 22:13

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