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I'm teaching myself about structures in C, and am having trouble compiling this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct Date {
    int Month;
    int Day;
    int Year;
};

void AddDecade(struct Date);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    struct Date BDay;
    char buffer[50];

    printf("What month were you born? ");
    BDay.Month = atoi(gets_s(buffer, 50));

    printf("What day were you born? ");
    BDay.Day = atoi(gets_s(buffer, 50));

    printf("What year were you born? ");
    BDay.year = atoi(gets_s(buffer, 50));

    printf("You were born on %d, %d, %d?\n", BDay.Month, BDay.Day, BDay.Year);

    AddDecade(BDay);

    printf("You will be 10 years older on %d, %d, %d\n", BDay.Month, BDay.Day, BDay.Year);
}

void AddDecade(struct Date Target) {
    Target.Year += 10;
}

The author of the code compiled it without error on a Windows machine, but on my Linux machine gcc gives the following errors:

07_04_structures2.c: In function ‘main’:

07_04_structures2.c:18:5: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘atoi’ makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]

/usr/include/stdlib.h:148:12: note: expected ‘const char *’ but argument is of type ‘int’

07_04_structures2.c:21:5: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘atoi’ makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]

/usr/include/stdlib.h:148:12: note: expected ‘const char *’ but argument is of type ‘int’

07_04_structures2.c:24:9: error: ‘struct Date’ has no member named ‘year’

07_04_structures2.c:24:5: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘atoi’ makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]

/usr/include/stdlib.h:148:12: note: expected ‘const char *’ but argument is of type ‘int’

Given this line:

BDay.Month = atoi(gets_s(buffer, 50));

My understanding is that gets_s copies a maximum of 50 bytes of input into buffer, and passes a pointer to the variable 'buffer', to atoi, but according to this error:

note: expected ‘const char *’ but argument is of type ‘int’

perhaps gets_s is at fault here? I've never used it before...

I'd be very thankful for a detailed explanation of what's wrong, and how to fix it.

Thanks a lot!


Update:

I implemented all of your recommendations and have come up with the following working code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct Date {
    int Month; 
    int Day;
    int Year;
};

struct Date AddDecade(struct Date);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    struct Date BDay;
    char buffer[50];
    char *buffer_end;

    printf("What month were you born? ");
    fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin);
    BDay.Month = strtol(buffer, &buffer_end, 10);

    printf("What day were you born? ");
    fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin);
    BDay.Day = strtol(buffer, &buffer_end, 10);

    printf("What year were you born? ");
    fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin);
    BDay.Year = strtol(buffer, &buffer_end, 10);

    printf("You were born on %d, %d, %d?\n", BDay.Month, BDay.Day, BDay.Year);

    BDay = AddDecade(BDay);

    printf("You will be 10 years older on %d, %d, %d\n", BDay.Month, BDay.Day, BDay.Year);
}

struct Date
AddDecade(struct Date Target) {
    Target.Year += 10;
    return Target;
}

This has been a great learning experience for me! Thank you! :)

share|improve this question
    
On another note, BDay.year = atoi(gets_s(buffer, 50)); causes the error third line from below, the field is capitalised, Year. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 24 '12 at 23:28
1  
Well, since you are teaching yourself C, it might a good time to tell you that you should not be using atoi. Even though this function is not officially deprecated, it really has no meaningful practical uses, since it provides no feedback in case of an error. If you need to convert a string representation of a number into an actual value, use functions from strto... group. Forget about ato... functions for good. Any time you see it used in the actual code, it is a direct indication of bad code quality. –  AnT Jan 24 '12 at 23:33
    
Regarding: strtol, strtoll, & strtoq - Reading the man pages fully illustrate what you mean about atoi being deprecated. The strto... functions are really useful because of their support for returning error feedback. From the manual pages: "The strtol() function returns the result of the conversion, unless the value would underflow or overflow. If an underflow occurs, strtol() returns LONG_MIN. If an overflow occurs, strtol() returns LONG_MAX..." –  Totoro Jan 25 '12 at 7:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

get_s() isn't implemented in the Linux C library, so the compiler assumes the default of it being a function that returns and int takes whatever (promoted) parameters you pass it.

You'll need to recode to avoid using gets_s(). Probably the simplest fix is to use fgets() instead. Change the lines similar to:

BDay.Month = atoi(gets_s(buffer, 50));

with:

fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin);
BDay.Month = atoi(buffer);
share|improve this answer
    
fgets also returns buffer, unless it fails, which you should of course check for. –  R.. Jan 24 '12 at 23:38
    
Your suggested fix got the ball rolling for me which eventually helped me fix the issues, and learn a great deal. Thank you! –  Totoro Jan 25 '12 at 12:20

gets_s is a function defined in C11 and it is defined as an optional extension.

You have to compile your program with C11 support otherwise the gets_s function is not declared in stdio.h. When the function is not declared in stdio.h and there is no available prototype for the function like in your program, gcc will then implicity provide a prototype for gets_s that returns an int (implicit function declaration).

On gcc compiling with C11 is done with option -std=c11 on gcc 4.7 and -std=c1x in older gcc. Note that as of today support of C11 in gcc (and Linux C libraries like glibc or eglibc) is still very incomplete and gets_s may be also not declared even when C11 option is enabled (not to mention the extension is optional).

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using gcc version 4.6.2 20111027, and compilation still failed after using the -std=c1x switch. Thanks for letting me know all of the specifics about gets_s! –  Totoro Jan 25 '12 at 0:05
    
@Totoro See my last paragraph, gets_s is probably still not implemented with your version of gcc and the libc you are using. Remember that C11 has been released since only 1 month! –  ouah Jan 25 '12 at 0:21

gets_s is not standard function in most versions of C language.

Since you didn't declare get_s, the compiler assume (as default) that it returns int, and hence the error.

Also, look at the error at line 24. (you should change year to Year)

share|improve this answer
    
It's very helpful knowing what is standard practice, what is deprecated, and what is simply not in standard use in the world of C. Good resources of information when learning C are really appreciated! –  Totoro Jan 25 '12 at 7:16

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