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I'm currently studying the book accelerated C++ (Koenig / Moo) and I'm having trouble with one of the exercises. The problem is to write a program which takes as an input some sequence of words which it then stores in a map. The strings are the words entered and the associated int is the number of times each word occurs. You then have to sort the words by the number of times they occur; that is, by the value and not the key. You can't sort a map by the value, so I tried to copy the elements to a vector instead, which I intended to sort using a predicate. Unfortunately, all I get is a screen full of errors from g++. They seem to stem from the same place - putting the elements of my map into my vector, which I try to do like this:

int main()
{
    map<string, int> counters;

    cout << "Enter some words followed by end-of-file (ctrl-d): ";
    string word;
    while (cin >> word)
       ++counters[word];

    //maps cannot be sorted by values, so pass the elements of counters to a vector
    vector<map<string, int> > vec_counters;

    map<string, int>::const_iterator it = counters.begin();
    while (it != counters.end()) {
       vec_counters.push_back(*it);
       ++it;
    }

This is obviously just the first part, but I can't get even this to compile. I get the error:

32:31: error: no matching function for call to std::vector, int> >::push_back(const std::pair, int>&)’ /usr/include/c++/4.5/bits/stl_vector.h:741:7: note: candidate is: void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::map, int>, _Alloc = std::allocator, int> >, value_type = std::map, int>]

I guess I'm doing something fundamentally stupid... but I can't for the life of me see what..

Any help would be great!

C

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1  
This sounds like a job for a Boost.Bimap! –  Kerrek SB Jan 24 '12 at 23:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm pretty sure you aren't looking for a vector of maps:

#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
int main()
{
    map<string, int> counters;

    cout << "Enter some words followed by end-of-file (ctrl-d): ";
    string word;
    while (cin >> word)
       ++counters[word];

    vector<std::pair<string, int> > vec(counters.begin(), counters.end());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Arr, partial std abuser! –  Kerrek SB Jan 24 '12 at 23:47
    
@KerrekSB: not. I just copied the sample from the OP, and I can't break my good habits :) (hi, by the way) –  sehe Jan 24 '12 at 23:52
    
Thanks sehe, stupid mistake on my part - obviously there is only one map. I didn't know that each element of a map was referred to as a pair, though. KarrekSB: you mention partial use of std:: in the actual code. I tend to put in all the 'using std::cin;' type lines at the start. Is that considered bad practice? –  weatherwax007 Jan 25 '12 at 10:49

A bit off-topic, but here's a sexy solution using a bimap, which is a map in which both sides work as keys.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <boost/bimap.hpp>
#include <boost/bimap/list_of.hpp>
#include <boost/bimap/set_of.hpp>

int main()
{
    boost::bimap<boost::bimaps::set_of<std::string>, boost::bimaps::list_of<int>> m;

    for (std::string line; std::getline(std::cin, line); )
    {
        ++m.left[line];
    }

    auto & bml = m.left;
    auto & bmr = m.right;

    bmr.sort();

    for (auto const & p : bml) { std::cout << p.first << " => " << p.second << "\n"; }
    for (auto const & p : bmr) { std::cout << p.first << " => " << p.second << "\n"; }
}
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Thanks! Wasn't even aware of bimap. –  weatherwax007 Jan 25 '12 at 10:52

You want to put the elements of a map in a vector. Maps are made out of pairs, not other maps. Therefore, your vector should be a vector of pairs.

That said, it looks like the reason you want the vector in the first place is to sort by values in the map. Why not then make your map map< int, string > instead? This will result in it being sorted in ascending order by the ints : Elements in the map are sorted from lower to higher key value following a specific strict weak ordering criterion.

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Dereferencing a std::map<std::string, int>::const_iterator gives you a std::pair<std:string, int>, not a std::map<std::string, int>, so instead of this:

vector<map<string, int> > vec_counters;

you want this:

vector<std::pair<string, int> > vec_counters;
share|improve this answer
    
This question is probably one of the most obscure C++ STL usage questions ever. Following up with OP's question, does std::pair still give you the benefit of std::map's fast retrieval? –  Xavier Ho Jan 24 '12 at 23:43
    
@XavierHo: A std::pair<std::string, int> has a single std::string and a single int, so it's actually much faster retrieval than std::map, which has all the overhead of potentially having multiple elements. –  ruakh Jan 24 '12 at 23:55
    
After re-reading OP's question, I think I misunderstood his intention. Yes, std::pair will be the best choice for the use case. I was thinking actually having a std::map in a std::vector, which is a different data structure entirely. –  Xavier Ho Jan 25 '12 at 0:01

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