Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table with ~7 million rows which I am continually running queries of this sort:

SELECT 
      MyField, 
      COUNT(*) 
   FROM 
      MyTable 
   WHERE 
          MyField2='ConstantValue' 
      AND MyField NOT IN ( SELECT Field 
                              FROM AnotherTable) 
      AND Timestamp >= [ArbitraryTimestamp] 
   GROUP BY 
      MyField;

Cardinalities for the above fields:

  • MyField = About 40,000 distinct values.
  • Timestamp = Most are distinct, so around 7 million distinct values.
  • MyField2 = 2 distinct values.
  • Field FROM AnotherTable = About 50 distinct values.

As expected, this runs terribly slow, and using EXPLAIN tells me that I am Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort.

I would like to improve the efficiency of these queries by adding an index to this table, but I'm not sure what the best way to do this is.

Should I add an index on MyField? And index on Timestamp? Both? A combined index on both?

Also, is there anything else I can do to speed up these type of queries?

share|improve this question
1  
We can't give you a complete answer with an incomplete query, please post the '...' of the WHERE clause. –  Mike Purcell Jan 25 '12 at 1:16
    
Other trivial selection criteria are quite important. Index usage depends on everything that is in WHERE. –  piotrm Jan 25 '12 at 1:18
    
Ok, have updated the question. –  DanielGibbs Jan 25 '12 at 1:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In addition to the suggestions from Mike and DKamins, having a sub-query might be another bottleneck. I would restructure it to a LEFT JOIN and where apply based on IS NULL (ensure the "AnotherTable" has an index on "field" for the join

SELECT 
      MyField, 
      COUNT(*) 
   FROM 
      MyTable 
         LEFT join AnotherTable
            on MyTable.MyField = AnotherTable.Field
   WHERE 
          MyField2='ConstantValue' 
      AND AnotherTable.Field IS NULL 
      AND Timestamp >= [ArbitraryTimestamp] 
   GROUP BY 
      MyField;

I would specifically have my index based on (MyField2, TimeStamp, MyField). MyField2 is your specific qualifier, don't bother including other crud within your focus... From that, you are looking at specific timeframe... From that, having the MyField too will help optimize the GroupBy. The first two parts of the key/where, it was specifically used to filter your criteria, thus the rest remain in proper order already for the grouping.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This way of doing it reduced the query time significantly. –  DanielGibbs Jan 25 '12 at 3:01
    
@DanieL, great to hear... BTW, how significantly... you didn't identify how "significantly slow" the original query was. Knowing performance improvements can help others understand at some scale how certain handling impacts, and at what factor. –  DRapp Jan 25 '12 at 3:40
    
The original query took 2 mins, 20 seconds whereas modifying it using your suggestion reduced it to 28 seconds. –  DanielGibbs Jan 25 '12 at 4:17

You should add an dual-key index with MyField first (to group by):

CREATE INDEX MyIndex
    ON MyTable (MyField, Timestamp)
share|improve this answer
    
Honestly I don't think adding an index to the timestamp column is going to help much. It has a high cardinality which will result in a large index footprint. –  Mike Purcell Jan 25 '12 at 1:22
    
@MikePurcell, this depends on the table and use case. If the table is huge with 50 other columns and he needs to do this group count frequently, then it is worth the disk space to index it. –  dkamins Jan 25 '12 at 1:45

That GROUPBY on MyField is going to force MySQL to create a temp table, which is why you are getting the using temporary in your EXPLAIN. And creating a temp table with ~7 million rows will definitely be a painful query.

Couple of things to try (after implementing each suggestion, re-run the query and check query times):

  1. Add index to MyField
  2. See if it's possible to limit number of rows by adding a max timestamp (combined with your min timestamp)
  3. Add index to MyField2 and MyField3 columns exclusively
  4. If you are still getting slow query response, try adding a composite index across all three columns (Myfield, MyField2, and MyField3)

If none of the above help you immediately, check out this post describing how to use a sub-query to get the count, which avoids the GROUP BY altogether.

share|improve this answer
    
1. Didn't seem to affect it at all. 2. Not really possible, the max timestamp is usually the current time so won't really narrow down the number of rows. 3. Doing this doubled the execution time. 4. I got mixed up, MyField and MyField3 are the same in this case, and MyField2 has a cardinality of 2 in this case, so this doesn't really help. I think the culprit for the long execution time is actually the MyField3 NOT IN (SELECT Field FROM AnotherTable) as removing that improves performance drastically. –  DanielGibbs Jan 25 '12 at 2:24
    
Turns out I was getting several different queries mixed up in my head when asking the question. I have updated it to be more concise. –  DanielGibbs Jan 25 '12 at 2:28
    
Looks like DRApp's suggestion was spot on. I didn't even consider the join. Next time include the entire query so you get better help. –  Mike Purcell Jan 25 '12 at 4:42
    
My apologies, I was trying to generalize it to a whole group of queries using GROUP BY but then it turned into a question about this one particular query that was taking so long. I'll try to be more clear next time. –  DanielGibbs Jan 25 '12 at 7:24
    
No worries. The end result is your question was answered, so winnar! –  Mike Purcell Jan 25 '12 at 17:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.