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There are so many different ways to include JavaScript in a html page. I know about the following options:

  • inline code or loaded from external URI
  • included in <head> or <body> tag [1,2]
  • having none, defer or async attribute (only external scripts)
  • included in static source or added dynamically by other scripts (at different parse states, with different methods)

Not counting browserscripts from the harddisk, javascript:URIs and onEvent-attributes [3], there are already 16 alternatives to get JS executed and I'm sure I forgot something.

I'm not so concerned with fast (parallel) loading, I'm more curious about the execution order (which may depend on loading order and document order). Is there a good (cross-browser) reference that covers really all cases? E.g. http://www.websiteoptimization.com/speed/tweak/defer/ only deals with 6 of them, and tests mostly old browsers.

As I fear there's not, here is my specific question: I've got some (external) head scripts for initialisation and script loading. Then I've got two static, inline scripts in the end of the body. The first one lets the script loader dynamically append another script element (referencing external js) to the body. The second of the static, inline scripts wants to use js from the added, external script. Can it rely on the other having been executed (and why :-)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 76 down vote accepted

If you aren't dynamically loading scripts or marking them as defer or async, then scripts are loaded in the order encountered in the page. It doesn't matter whether it's an external script or an inline script - they are executed in the order they are encountered in the page. Inline scripts that come after external scripts have are held until all external scripts that came before them have loaded and run.

Async scripts (regardless of how they are specified as async) load and run in an unpredictable order. The browser loads them in parallel and it is free to run them in whatever order it wants.

There is no predictable order among multiple async things. If one needed a predictable order, then it would have to be coded in by registering for load notifications from the async scripts and manually sequencing javascript calls when the appropriate things are loaded.

When a script tag is inserted dynamically, how the execution order behaves will depend upon the browser. You can see how Firefox behaves in this reference article. In a nutshell, the newer versions of Firefox default a dynamically added script tag to async unless the script tag has been set otherwise.

Here's a quote from that article:

script-inserted scripts execute asynchronously in IE and WebKit, but synchronously in Opera and pre-4.0 Firefox.

The relevant part of the HTML5 spec (for newer compliant browsers) is here. There is a lot written in there about async behavior. Obviously, this spec doesn't apply to older browsers (or mal-confirming browsers) who's behavior you would probably have to test to determine.

A quote from the HTML5 spec:

Then, the first of the following options that describes the situation must be followed:

If the element has a src attribute, and the element has a defer attribute, and the element has been flagged as "parser-inserted", and the element does not have an async attribute The element must be added to the end of the list of scripts that will execute when the document has finished parsing associated with the Document of the parser that created the element.

The task that the networking task source places on the task queue once the fetching algorithm has completed must set the element's "ready to be parser-executed" flag. The parser will handle executing the script.

If the element has a src attribute, and the element has been flagged as "parser-inserted", and the element does not have an async attribute The element is the pending parsing-blocking script of the Document of the parser that created the element. (There can only be one such script per Document at a time.)

The task that the networking task source places on the task queue once the fetching algorithm has completed must set the element's "ready to be parser-executed" flag. The parser will handle executing the script.

If the element does not have a src attribute, and the element has been flagged as "parser-inserted", and the Document of the HTML parser or XML parser that created the script element has a style sheet that is blocking scripts The element is the pending parsing-blocking script of the Document of the parser that created the element. (There can only be one such script per Document at a time.)

Set the element's "ready to be parser-executed" flag. The parser will handle executing the script.

If the element has a src attribute, does not have an async attribute, and does not have the "force-async" flag set The element must be added to the end of the list of scripts that will execute in order as soon as possible associated with the Document of the script element at the time the prepare a script algorithm started.

The task that the networking task source places on the task queue once the fetching algorithm has completed must run the following steps:

If the element is not now the first element in the list of scripts that will execute in order as soon as possible to which it was added above, then mark the element as ready but abort these steps without executing the script yet.

Execution: Execute the script block corresponding to the first script element in this list of scripts that will execute in order as soon as possible.

Remove the first element from this list of scripts that will execute in order as soon as possible.

If this list of scripts that will execute in order as soon as possible is still not empty and the first entry has already been marked as ready, then jump back to the step labeled execution.

If the element has a src attribute The element must be added to the set of scripts that will execute as soon as possible of the Document of the script element at the time the prepare a script algorithm started.

The task that the networking task source places on the task queue once the fetching algorithm has completed must execute the script block and then remove the element from the set of scripts that will execute as soon as possible.

Otherwise The user agent must immediately execute the script block, even if other scripts are already executing.

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Thanks for the answer, but the problem is the script is dynamically added to the page, which means it is considered to be async. Or does that only work in <head>? And my experience is also that they're executed in document order? –  Bergi Jan 25 '12 at 8:35
    
@Bergi - If it's dynamically added, then it is async and the execution order is indeterminate unless you write code to control it. –  jfriend00 Jan 25 '12 at 9:06
    
Just, Kolink states the opposite... –  Bergi Jan 25 '12 at 22:19
    
@Bergi - OK, I've modified my answer to say that async scripts load in an indeterminate order. They can be loaded in any order. If I were you, I would not count on Kolink's observation being the way it always is. I know of no standard that says a dynamically added script has to be run immediately and has to block other scripts from running until it's loaded. I would expect that to be browser dependent and also perhaps dependent upon environmental factors (whether the script is cached, etc...). –  jfriend00 Jan 25 '12 at 22:32
    
I agree on your concerns. But effectively, the new script, appended to the end of the body, seems to behave like unparsed tag soup - the document parser is yet halted until the inline script is run. –  Bergi Jan 25 '12 at 22:50

The browser will execute the scripts in the order it finds them. If you call an external script, it will block the page until the script has been loaded and executed.

To test this fact:

// file: test.php
sleep(10);
die("alert('Done!');");

// HTML file:
<script type="text/javascript" src="test.php"></script>

Dynamically added scripts are executed as soon as they are appended to the document.

To test this fact:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Test</title>
</head>
<body>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var s = document.createElement('script');
        s.type = "text/javascript";
        s.src = "link.js"; // file contains alert("hello!");
        document.body.appendChild(s);
        alert("appended");
    </script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        alert("final");
    </script>
</body>
</html>

Order of alerts is "appended" -> "hello!" -> "final"

If in a script you attempt to access an element that hasn't been reached yet (example: <script>do something with #blah</script><div id="blah"></div>) then you will get an error.

Overall, yes you can include external scripts and then access their functions and variables, but only if you exit the current <script> tag and start a new one.

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I can confirm that behavior. But there are hints on our feedback pages, that it might only work when test.php is cached. Do you know any spec/reference links about this? –  Bergi Jan 25 '12 at 23:21
1  
link.js isn't blocking. Use a script similar to your php one to simulate a long download time. –  mintsauce Mar 12 at 12:00
    
This answer is incorrect. It is not always the case that "dynamically added scripts are executed as soon as they are appended to the document". Sometimes this is true (e.g. for old versions of Firefox), but usually it is not. The execution order, as mentioned in jfriend00's answer, is not determinate. –  Fabio Beltramini May 2 at 21:04

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