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Well, I'm currently attempting to build a website using the hosting from Google Appspot.

I would like to make a blog portion of my website using Wordpress. How can I host Wordpress on Google Appspot, despite that one uses Python and the other uses PHP (If I remember correctly)?

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4 Answers 4

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Great news! WordPress can be installed on App Engine, with MySQL, using the (experimental) PHP runtime for App Engine.

Details here: https://developers.google.com/appengine/articles/wordpress

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That's pretty cool, thanks. –  Odinulf May 24 '13 at 0:59
    
so, can you have Wordpress interact with some python apps running in App Engine? –  dde Aug 22 '13 at 20:30

Wordpress requires the hosting service to be able to support PHP and MySQL, both of which are not directly supported by Google App Engine, the underlying "hosting engine" behind what you called Google Appspot.

Google App Engine is more akin to a cloud computing app platform than a web hosting service. All websites hosted under the appspot.com domain are actually GAE apps. At the moment, the support for languages are limited to Java (and JVM languages), Python, and Go.

If you are looking for off-the-shelf library or tools where you could simply install and run Wordpress on Google App Engine, there are no such thing at the moment.

Yet, if you are willing to get your hand dirty, some brave souls are apparently bold enough to engineer a way for PHP applications to be able to be run in GAE. Take a look at this blog post, which shows the way to run PHP applications in GAE/J using Quercus. Coincidentally, the PHP application that they are trying to run is Wordpress itself.

Please note that the blog post is from 2009, and GAE had evolved a lot since then. You would notice that the majority of the post is about converting Wordpress' MySQL queries to be able to play with Google's datastore, since at that time GAE does not support MySQL databases.

Back in October 2011, the App Engine team rolled a limited preview support for Google Cloud SQL, so you would probably save some time in making Wordpress+Quercus works in App Engine if you could sign up for the preview and use Google Cloud SQL as your backing database. (A small caveat, Google Cloud SQL is free now because they hasn't published their pricing yet. They would do so at some point in the future, so don't be surprised if you would need to pay for the service later on)

As you can imagine, the path to enable Wordpress in GAE is not easy. If you really want to host your blog in the cloud, why don't you host your blog at Amazon Web Service instead? If "free hosting" is what you are looking for, I don't think GAE is the right place for you. It is more like a platform for business apps than a hosting service.

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Thanks man, that was very helpful. –  Odinulf Jan 25 '12 at 20:10

Write your app on App Engine, and host the blog on a separate subdomain - eg, blog.yourapp.com - with your own hosting or a dedicated Wordpress hosting provider.

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Well, I would like to host everything on one domain, considering I'm not paying for anything. (I just want a subdomain from google appspot) Additionally, the Website is the Web App. –  Odinulf Jan 25 '12 at 4:19
    
@Odinulf You cannot host both on the same domain without proxying it, and I really wouldn't advise that. I'm not sure why having separate subdomains is a problem, or why it's relevant whether you're paying or not? –  Nick Johnson Jan 25 '12 at 12:35

Why not to move to Jelastic? With its service you can easily deploy WordPress to the cloud. It is pretty clear if you follow this instruction: http://jelastic.com/docs/wordpress

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