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Friends, I am trying to learn the openMP paradigm. I used the following code to understand the #omp for pragma.

int main(void){
int tid;
int i;

omp_set_num_threads(5);
#pragma omp parallel \
    private(tid)
{
    tid=omp_get_thread_num();
    printf("tid=%d started ...\n", tid);
    fflush(stdout);

    #pragma omp for
    for(i=1; i<=20; i++){
        printf("t%d - i%d \n",
                omp_get_thread_num(), i);
        fflush(stdout);
    }

    printf("tid=%d work done ...\n", tid);
}

return 0;

}

In the above code, there is an implicit barrier at the end of #pragma omp parallel, meaning all the threads 0,1,2,3,4 must reach there before going to the next statement.

So, to check this barrier, I enclosed this "pragma for" in a condition if(tid!=0), meaning all threads except thread 0 i.e 1,2,3,4 should complete their work in the loop and wait for thread0 indefinitely. But, to my surprise this is not happening. Every thread is doing its iteration and completing successfully. i.e t1 completes iterations 5,6,7,8 ---- t2 does 9,10,11,12 ---- t3 does 13,14,15,16 and t4 does 17,18,19,20. Please note : iteration 1,2,3,4 were never completed.

To dig deeper, instead of tid!=0, I enclosed the same #pragma for in tid!=1 meaning instead of thread0, thread1 bypasses the barrier. To my surprise, the program now hangs and all threads wait for the thread1.

Can somebody please tell me the explanation for such unexpected behavior. Final code that hanged :

int main(void){
int tid;
int i;

omp_set_num_threads(5);
#pragma omp parallel \
    private(tid)
{
    tid=omp_get_thread_num();
    printf("tid=%d started ...\n", tid);
    fflush(stdout);

    if(tid!=1){
        /* worksharing */
        #pragma omp for
        for(i=1; i<=20; i++){
            printf("t%d - i%d \n", 
                omp_get_thread_num(), i);
            fflush(stdout);
        }
    }else{
        printf("t1 reached here. \n");
    }

    printf("tid=%d work done ...\n", tid);
}

return 0;

}

I tried setting i shared or private, but it did not change the behavior of the program.

share|improve this question
    
#pragma omp for provides a way to get rid of the implicit barrier at the end of the loop using a "nowait" keyword but i did not use it. –  prathmesh.kallurkar Jan 25 '12 at 4:32
    
1) i needs to be private. 2) omp for as a work-sharing construct shares the work on the already existing threads. Since thread 1 hangs for the execution of the work-sharing for loop, you block yourself. See work-sharing constructs –  Bort Jan 25 '12 at 9:36
    
Checking for master and worker threads and the like is more mpi or pthread style. The idea behind openmp is exactly to get rid of all this fiddeling around between master and the rest. Of course it can be done but you may want to seperate tasks rather distuingish between the different threads. –  Bort Jan 25 '12 at 10:01
    
@ Bort : even i dont want to code this way when i actually solve problems but i am confused with the implementation of openmp. I performed one more check to see if the program was hanging if there was a gap between number of threads entering the loop i.e. 0,2,3,4. So i replaced the condition with if(tid==1 || tid==4 || tid==5). But the program does not hang now. So, there is something special about the master thread that i am not able to understand here. –  prathmesh.kallurkar Jan 25 '12 at 11:09
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem here is that the behaviour is undefined by the standard. From Section 2.5, line 21 of the OpenMP 3.1 specification (but the text has stayed the same more or less since the beginning):

• Each worksharing region must be encountered by all threads in a team or by none at all.

Where omp for is a worksharing construct. So yes, I too would normally expect a hang with your code, but the compiler is entitled to assume that what you're doing never happens, and so the end result -- it sometimes hangs but sometimes doesn't, depending on the details on which threads you hold up -- maybe isn't that surprising.

share|improve this answer
1  
thanks for the link. Even i knew that this had undefined behavior but still went ahead to know the actual implementation of openMP library. My learning from this was : "Only one barrier is implemented per parallel block. So signaling from one thread to another works across different barriers within same parallel block." –  prathmesh.kallurkar Jan 25 '12 at 14:31
1  
and hopefully: My learning from this was : I won't use undefined behaviour in the future because it will cause all kinds of unexpected behviour. –  Bort Jan 26 '12 at 8:57
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