Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm developing a game which features a sizeable square 2d playing area. The gaming area is tileless with bounded sides (no wrapping around). I am trying to figure out how I can best divide up this world to increase the performance of collision detection. Rather than checking each entity for collision with all other entities I want to only check nearby entities for collision and obstacle avoidance.

I have a few special concerns for this game world...

  • I want to be able to be able to use a large number of entities in the game world at once. However, a % of entities won't collide with entities of the same type. For example projectiles won't collide with other projectiles.

  • I want to be able to use a large range of entity sizes. I want there to be a very large size difference between the smallest entities and the largest.

  • There are very few static or non-moving entities in the game world.

I'm interested in using something similar to what's described in the answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/371465/quadtree-vs-red-black-tree-for-a-game-in-c

My concern is how well will a tree subdivision of the world be able to handle large size differences in entities? To divide the world up enough for the smaller entities the larger ones will need to occupy a large number of regions and I'm concerned about how that will affect the performance of the system.

My other major concern is how to properly keep the list of occupied areas up to date. Since there's a lot of moving entities, and some very large ones, it seems like dividing the world up will create a significant amount of overhead for keeping track of which entities occupy which regions.

I'm mostly looking for any good algorithms or ideas that will help reduce the number collision detection and obstacle avoidance calculations.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

If I were you I'd start off by implementing a simple BSP (binary space partition) tree. Since you are working in 2D, bound box checks are really fast. You basically need three classes: CBspTree, CBspNode and CBspCut (not really needed)

  1. CBspTree has one root node instance of class CBspNode
  2. CBspNode has an instance of CBspCut
  3. CBspCut symbolize how you cut a set in two disjoint sets. This can neatly be solved by introducing polymorphism (e.g. CBspCutX or CBspCutY or some other cutting line). CBspCut also has two CBspNode

The interface towards the divided world will be through the tree class and it can be a really good idea to create one more layer on top of that, in case you would like to replace the BSP solution with e.g. a quad tree. Once you're getting the hang of it. But in my experience, a BSP will do just fine.

There are different strategies of how to store your items in the tree. What I mean by that is that you can choose to have e.g. some kind of container in each node that contains references to the objects occuping that area. This means though (as you are asking yourself) that large items will occupy many leaves, i.e. there will be many references to large objects and very small items will show up at single leaves.

In my experience this doesn't have that large impact. Of course it matters, but you'd have to do some testing to check if it's really an issue or not. You would be able to get around this by simply leaving those items at branched nodes in the tree, i.e. you will not store them on "leaf level". This means you will find those objects quick while traversing down the tree.

When it comes to your first question. If you only are going to use this subdivision for collision testing and nothing else, I suggest that things that can never collide never are inserted into the tree. A missile for example as you say, can't collide with another missile. Which would mean that you dont even have to store the missile in the tree.

However, you might want to use the bsp for other things as well, you didn't specify that but keep that in mind (for picking objects with e.g. the mouse). Otherwise I propose that you store everything in the bsp, and resolve the collision later on. Just ask the bsp of a list of objects in a certain area to get a limited set of possible collision candidates and perform the check after that (assuming objects know what they can collide with, or some other external mechanism).

If you want to speed up things, you also need to take care of merge and split, i.e. when things are removed from the tree, a lot of nodes will become empty or the number of items below some node level will decrease below some merge threshold. Then you want to merge two subtrees into one node containing all items. Splitting happens when you insert items into the world. So when the number of items exceed some splitting threshold you introduce a new cut, which splits the world in two. These merge and split thresholds should be two constants that you can use to tune the efficiency of the tree.

Merge and split are mainly used to keep the tree balanced and to make sure that it works as efficient as it can according to its specifications. This is really what you need to worry about. Moving things from one location and thus updating the tree is imo fast. But when it comes to merging and splitting it might become expensive if you do it too often.

This can be avoided by introducing some kind of lazy merge and split system, i.e. you have some kind of dirty flagging or modify count. Batch up all operations that can be batched, i.e. moving 10 objects and inserting 5 might be one batch. Once that batch of operations is finished, you check if the tree is dirty and then you do the needed merge and/or split operations.

Post some comments if you want me to explain further.

Cheers !


Edit

There are many things that can be optimized in the tree. But as you know, premature optimization is the root to all evil. So start off simple. For example, you might create some generic callback system that you can use while traversing the tree. This way you dont have to query the tree to get a list of objects that matched the bound box "question", instead you can just traverse down the tree and execute that call back each time you hit something. "If this bound box I'm providing intersects you, then execute this callback with these parameters"

share|improve this answer

You most definitely want to check this list of collision detection resources from gamedev.net out. It's full of resources with game development conventions.

For other than collision detection only, check their entire list of articles and resources.

share|improve this answer

My concern is how well will a tree subdivision of the world be able to handle large size differences in entities? To divide the world up enough for the smaller entities the larger ones will need to occupy a large number of regions and I'm concerned about how that will affect the performance of the system.

Use a quad tree. For objects that exist in multiple areas you have a few options:

  • Store the object in both branches, all the way down. Everything ends up in leaf nodes but you may end up with a significant number of extra pointers. May be appropriate for static things.

  • Split the object on the zone border and insert each part in their respective locations. Creates a lot of pain and isn't well defined for a lot of objects.

  • Store the object at the lowest point in the tree you can. Sets of objects now exist in leaf and non-leaf nodes, but each object has one pointer to it in the tree. Probably best for objects that are going to move.

By the way, the reason you're using a quad tree is because it's really really easy to work with. You don't have any heuristic based creation like you might with some BSP implementations. It's simple and it gets the job done.

My other major concern is how to properly keep the list of occupied areas up to date. Since there's a lot of moving entities, and some very large ones, it seems like dividing the world up will create a significant amount of overhead for keeping track of which entities occupy which regions.

There will be overhead to keeping your entities in the correct spots in the tree every time they move, yes, and it can be significant. But the whole point is that you're doing much much less work in your collision code. Even though you're adding some overhead with the tree traversal and update it should be much smaller than the overhead you just removed by using the tree at all.

Obviously depending on the number of objects, size of game world, etc etc the trade off might not be worth it. Usually it turns out to be a win, but it's hard to know without doing it.

share|improve this answer

There are lots of approaches. I'd recommend settings some specific goals (e.g., x collision tests per second with a ratio of y between smallest to largest entities), and do some prototyping to find the simplest approach that achieves those goals. You might be surprised how little work you have to do to get what you need. (Or it might be a ton of work, depending on your particulars.)

Many acceleration structures (e.g., a good BSP) can take a while to set up and thus are generally inappropriate for rapid animation.

There's a lot of literature out there on this topic, so spend some time searching and researching to come up with a list candidate approaches. Mock them up and profile.

share|improve this answer

I'd be tempted just to overlay a coarse grid over the play area to form a 2D hash. If the grid is at least the size of the largest entity then you only ever have 9 grid squares to check for collisions and it's a lot simpler than managing quad-trees or arbitrary BSP trees. The overhead of determining which coarse grid square you're in is typically just 2 arithmetic operations and when a change is detected the grid just has to remove one reference/ID/pointer from one square's list and add the same to another square.

Further gains can be had from keeping the projectiles out of the grid/tree/etc lookup system - since you can quickly determine where the projectile would be in the grid, you know which grid squares to query for potential collidees. If you check collisions against the environment for each projectile in turn, there's no need for the other entities to then check for collisions against the projectiles in reverse.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.