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I have the following entities:

- Flight itinerary: gives an idea of what flight from destination to arrival city
- Passenger type: Adult, Child, Infant
- Cabin type: Economy, Mid-Economy, Business
- Price: price is based on the combination of Passenger type and Cabin type

I have two options for modelling this. Assuming a table contains flight itinerary information and yields flightId for that flight.

Case A:

Price table:

flightId    |   PassengerType   |   CabinType   |   Price

Case B:

FlightPassenger table

flightPassId    |   flightId    |   PassengerType

PassengerCabin table

flightPassCabinId   |   flightPassId    |   CabinType

Price table

flightPassCabinId   |   Price

Approach B enables me to add more entities in future and the price table can then easily factor in those entities.

I'm divided between these two approaches. Which one should I run with ? What are the pros and cons of either ?

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you should have an identifier (ID) for every entity that you which to name. this is the key lesson of normalization. –  Dan D. Jan 25 '12 at 6:20
    
@DanD. In this case, PassengerType and CabinType are limited to a set of unique values. –  brainydexter Jan 25 '12 at 6:22
    
True but that only means there are no relations where those are the primary key or part of a composite primary key. but there might be reason for them to be such as (CabinType, Language, LocalizedString) –  Dan D. Jan 25 '12 at 6:25
    
@DanD. Can you please elaborate a bit on your comment above ? I couldn't understand that. –  brainydexter Jan 25 '12 at 6:28
    
For the love of God... Option 1! See KISS Principle –  Bohemian Jan 25 '12 at 8:14

1 Answer 1

Before my answer, I would like to make an appointment: the flight's price is only about passenger type and cabin type? the distances between destinations doesn't matter?

I you use the basic normal forms, you should have the following tables (with some fields just for example). I this model, the price will be in the table "flight", which is going to store the values for cabine, flight and type of passenger. This way, one flight would have nine records for (Adult, child, infant) x (economy, mid-economy, business). Another way, which would consume less rows to each flight, should be you store modifiers for the passenger types. Eg: chield pays 50% of the price, etc... but, here goes the code:

   CREATE TABLE `passenger` (
      `pss_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
      `pss_name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
      `pss_type` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
      PRIMARY KEY (`pss_id`),
      CONSTRAINT `fk_idtypepass` FOREIGN KEY (`pss_type`) 
      REFERENCES `pass_type` (`pst_id`)
      ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE CASCADE
    )

    CREATE TABLE `pass_type` (
    `pst_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `psd_description` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`pst_id`))

    CREATE TABLE `destination` (
    `dst_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `dst_name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`dst_id`))

    CREATE TABLE `cabin` (
    `cbn_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `cbn_name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`cbn_id`))

    CREATE TABLE `flight` (
    `fli_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `fli_from` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `fli_to` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `fli_cabin` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `fli_psstype` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `fli_price` double NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`fli_id`),
    CONSTRAINT `fkn_from` FOREIGN KEY (`fli_from`) REFERENCES `destination` (`dst_id`) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE NO ACTION,
    CONSTRAINT `fkn_to` FOREIGN KEY (`fli_to`) REFERENCES `destination` (`dst_id`) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE NO ACTION,
    CONSTRAINT `fkn_cabin` FOREIGN KEY (`fli_cabin`) REFERENCES `cabin` (`cbn_id`) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE NO ACTION,
    CONSTRAINT `fkn_psstype` FOREIGN KEY (`fli_psstype`) REFERENCES `pass_type` (`pst_id`) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE NO ACTION)

    CREATE TABLE `flight_x_passenger` (
    `fxp_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `fxp_flight` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    `fxp_passenger` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`fxp_id`),
    CONSTRAINT `fk_flight` FOREIGN KEY (`fxp_flight`) REFERENCES `flight` (`fli_id`) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE NO ACTION,
    CONSTRAINT `fk_passenger` FOREIGN KEY (`fxp_passenger`) REFERENCES `passenger` (`pss_id`) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE NO ACTION
)

Any questions, please contact me. Regards.

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