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I've found few questions concerning my problem but still, I couldn't hande with this on my own so I'll try to ask in here. I'll paste the code so I think it will be easier to explain.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(StartCalculation));
        thread.Start();
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }


    public void StartCalculation()
    {
        List<int> numbers = new List<int>();
        for (int i = 0; i <= 100; i++)
        {
            numbers.Add(i);
            string textForLabel = i.ToString();
            label.SafeInvoke(d => d.Text = textForLabel);
        }

    }  
}
  • I would like to have an acces from method StartCalculation which started in different thread. I'd like to access that int list from Form1 (10 elements after 10 secs, 20 elements after 20 secs and so). Is that possible?
  • Would creating list in Form1() and then changing it in StartCalculation be possible? Thanks for the answers :)

Edited for Groo- / -

public partial class Form1 : Form
{

List<int> list = new List<int>(); // list of int values from game's memory

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(refreshMemory));
    thread.Start();
    Thread thread2 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(checkMemory));
    thread2.Start();
}

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
}

public void refreshMemory()
{        
    while (true)
    {
     // ... refresh game's memory and then, refresh list //
    Thread.Sleep(100);
    }
}  

public void checkMemory()
{

    while (true)
    {
     // eg. if (list[0] == 5) {game:: move_right()}// 
    Thread.Sleep(100);
    }

}  

}

I'm making game bot. I want it to read game's memory in a different thread (changing memory list) and then, with few other methods (in different threads) I'd like to read from that list and do game actions depending on the memory values. It works (or just seem to be) but if You say it might be unsafe, I'd like to make it safe.

Hope I haven't made fool out of myself by pasting it here.

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6  
Here's a book: Threading in C#, Joseph Albahari –  Sjoerd Jan 25 '12 at 7:56
1  
Well, thank You! Thanks to that book, it's solved now :) –  Patryk Jan 25 '12 at 8:11
    
"10 elements after 10 secs, 20 elements after 20 secs" - why these delays? What if background thread produces elements at a faster rate? Or should this work as a producer/consumer queue, but with a threshold of min. 10 items? –  Groo Jan 25 '12 at 8:12
1  
@Patryk: if you are not modifying the list by adding or removing items (i.e. changing its length), simply swapping an int value or a different reference value is done atomically and doesn't by itself cause thread issues (in fact, any assignment involving a 32-bit or smaller value is atomic in .NET). But game loops are usually made in a single thread (read input -> calculate new positions -> check collisions -> render). Why are you insisting on multiple threads? You need one thread for the loop, and use the main (gui) thread for rendering. And apart from that, have you considered XNA? –  Groo Jan 25 '12 at 12:06
1  
Oh, now I get it. I thought you were making a game. And how do you fetch the game memory data, are you reading memory owned by a different process? Have you handled this part already? There are various ways to do this. What you posted is fairly simple, depending on the complexity of your logic, it may be sufficient. But I still believe that your thread can wake up, fetch the memory, process it, and go back to sleep in a single iteration. I can post another answer with some patterns later, right now I am slightly busy. –  Groo Jan 25 '12 at 14:12
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need some form of a synchronization mechanism to modify objects between multiple threads. If you don't use a specialized thread safe collection (these are available in .NET 4), you need to lock using a monitor.

Usually, a more appropriate collection type for the producer/consumer pattern is a Queue (a FIFO collection), instead of a List:

Plain Queue with explicit locking

private readonly object _lock = new object();
private readonly Queue<Item> _queue = new Queue<Item>();
private readonly AutoResetEvent _signal = new AutoResetEvent();

void ProducerThread()
{
    while (ShouldRun) 
    { 
        Item item = GetNextItem();

        // you need to make sure only
        // one thread can access the list
        // at a time
        lock (_lock)
        {
            _queue.Enqueue(item);
        }

        // notify the waiting thread
        _signal.Set();
    }

}

And in the consumer thread, you need to fetch the item and process it:

void ConsumerThread()
{
    while (ShouldRun)
    {
        // wait to be notified
        _signal.Wait();

        Item item = null;

        do
        { 
           item = null;

           // fetch the item,
           // but only lock shortly
           lock (_lock)
           {
               if (_queue.Count > 0)
                  item = _queue.Dequeue(item);
           }

           if (item != null)
           {
              // do stuff
           }            
        }
        while (item != null); // loop until there are items to collect
    }
}

Starting with .NET 4, there is a ConcurrentQueue<T> collection, a thread-safe FIFO, which removes the need to lock while accessing it and simplifies the code:

ConcurrentQueue

private readonly ConcurrentQueue<Item> _queue = new ConcurrentQueue<Item>();

void ProducerThread()
{
    while (ShouldRun) 
    { 
        Item item = GetNextItem();
        _queue.Enqueue(item);
        _signal.Set();
    }

}

void ConsumerThread()
{
    while (ShouldRun)
    {
        _signal.Wait();

        Item item = null;
        while (_queue.TryDequeue(out item))
        {
           // do stuff
        }
    }
}

Finally, if you only wish that your consumer thread gets items in chunks periodically, you would change this to:

ConcurrentQueue with threshold (10 sec. or 10 items)

private readonly ConcurrentQueue<Item> _queue = new ConcurrentQueue<Item>();

void ProducerThread()
{
    while (ShouldRun) 
    { 
        Item item = GetNextItem();
        _queue.Enqueue(item);

        // more than 10 items? panic!
        // notify consumer immediately

        if (_queue.Count >= 10)
           _signal.Set();
    }

}

void ConsumerThread()
{
    while (ShouldRun)
    {
        // wait for a signal, OR until
        // 10 seconds elapses
        _signal.Wait(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));

        Item item = null;
        while (_queue.TryDequeue(out item))
        {
           // do stuff
        }
    }
}

This pattern is so useful that it's nice to abstract it into a generic class which delegates producing and consuming to external code. It would be a good exercise to to make it generic.

You will also need a Stop method which will probably set a volatile bool flag indicating that it's time to stop, and then set the signal to unpause the consumer and allow it to end. I will leave this to you as an exercise.

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I'm only reading with few threads from one object and if I want to modify, I'm planning to allow 1 thread modify 1 object. Is it ok without ur stuff then? –  Patryk Jan 25 '12 at 8:35
1  
If a different thread is writing to an object which is not thread-safe, then you need to lock both reading and writing. Performance-wise, if you have many threads reading and only a single one writing, you may consider using a ReaderWriterLockSlim, which is designed to allow higher throughput for many concurrent readers. But for a low number of readers it may still be slower than a regular lock, and slightly more complicated to implement (so I wouldn't consider it at this time). –  Groo Jan 25 '12 at 8:43
1  
So, yes, you need a thread safe object if you want to modify it from a different thread. If it's a list, you most likely need a ConcurrentQueue. If it's not, post some additional details. –  Groo Jan 25 '12 at 8:44
    
ill use list of simple structure, some string and few ints, thats it :P Though there wouldnt be problem with few reading and 1 writing. Thanks for Your reply! I'd be grateful for showing me an example of ConcurrentQueue use with using my code :P –  Patryk Jan 25 '12 at 8:59
1  
Well, I wasnt able to post answer to my question (I'm too new in here :P) and I didnt want to paste the code here, through "Add Comment" so I've edited my main question. There's more info (i hope so) :P. –  Patryk Jan 25 '12 at 11:30
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in this case use

label.Invoke(..., textForLabel)
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