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Given a DateTime representing a person's birthday, how do I calculate their age?

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285  
Do we need to account in our code for cases where the person in question have travelled large distances near the speed of light? –  JTew Mar 25 '11 at 4:04
43  
what all of the answers so far have missed is that it depends where the person was born and where they are right now. –  Yaur May 21 '11 at 7:34
5  
@Yaur: Just convert the time of now + birth into GMT/UTC, age is only a relative value, hence timezones are irrelevant. For determining the user's current timezone, you can use GeoLocating. –  Quandary Oct 3 '11 at 10:20
2  
Pretty crazy how a post that doesn't even follow site guidelines gets 776 votes.. –  nwdev Jul 11 at 23:36

46 Answers 46

The simplest way I've ever found is this. It works correctly for the US and western europe locales. Can't speak to other locales, especially places like China. 4 extra compares, at most, following the initial computation of age.

public int AgeInYears( DateTime birthDate , DateTime referenceDate )
{
  Debug.Assert( 
      referenceDate >= birthDate , 
      "birth date must be on or prior to the reference date" ) ;

  DateTime birth     = birthDate.Date     ;
  DateTime reference = referenceDate.Date ;
  int      years     = ( reference.Year - birth.Year ) ;

  //
  // an offset of -1 is applied if the birth date has 
  // not yet occurred in the current year.
  //
  if      ( reference.Month > birth.Month )         ;
  else if ( reference.Month < birth.Month ) --years ;
  else // in birth month
  {
    if ( reference.Day < birth.Day ) --years ;
  }

  return years ;

}

I was looking over the answers to this and noticed that nobody has made reference to regulatory/legal implications of leap day births. For instance, per Wikipedia, if you're born on February 29th in various jurisdictions, you're non-leap year birthday varies:

  • In the United Kingdom and Hong Kong: it's the ordinal day of the year, so the next day, March 1st is your birthday.
  • In New Zealand: it's the previous day, February 28th for the purposes of driver licencing, and March 1st for other purposes.
  • Taiwan: it's February 28th.

And as near as I can tell, in the US, the statutes are silent on the matter, leaving it up to the common law and to how various regulatory bodies define things in their regulations.

To that end, an improvement:

public enum LeapDayRule
{
  OrdinalDay     = 1 ,
  LastDayOfMonth = 2 ,
}

static int ComputeAgeInYears( DateTime birth , DateTime reference , LeapYearBirthdayRule ruleInEffect )
{
  bool     isLeapYearBirthday = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.Calendar.IsLeapDay( birth.Year , birth.Month , birth.Day ) ;
  DateTime cutoff         ;

  if ( isLeapYearBirthday && !DateTime.IsLeapYear(reference.Year) )
  {
    switch ( ruleInEffect )
    {
    case LeapDayRule.OrdinalDay     :
      cutoff = new DateTime( reference.Year , 1 , 1 )
               .AddDays( birth.DayOfYear-1 ) ;
      break ;
    case LeapDayRule.LastDayOfMonth :
      cutoff = new DateTime( reference.Year , birth.Month , 1 )
               .AddMonths(1)
               .AddDays(-1)
               ;
      break ;
    default :
      throw new InvalidOperationException() ;
    }
  }
  else
  {
    cutoff = new DateTime(reference.Year,birth.Month,birth.Day) ;
  }

  int age = ( reference.Year - birth.Year ) + ( reference >= cutoff ? 0 : -1 ) ;
  return age < 0 ? 0 : age ;
}

It should be noted that this code assumes:

  • A western (European) reckoning of age, and
  • A calendar, like the Gregorian calendar that inserts a single leap day at the end of a month.
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Here's a DateTime extender that adds the age calculation to the DateTime object.

    public static class AgeExtender
    {
        public static int GetAge(this DateTime dt)
        {
            int d = int.Parse(dt.ToString("yyyyMMdd"));
            int t = int.Parse(DateTime.Today.ToString("yyyyMMdd"));
            return (t-d)/10000;
        }
    }
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1  
ugh, don't do this. ToString and int.Parse are both relatively expensive and while i'm anti micro-optimization hiding expensive functions in extension methods that should be trivial operations is not a good idea. –  Yaur May 21 '11 at 7:31
1  
Also, this is a duplicate of ScArcher2's answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/9/… –  David Schmitt May 30 '11 at 13:32

I've made one small change to Mark Soen's answer: I've rewriten the third line so that the expression can be parsed a bit more easily.

    public int AgeInYears(DateTime bday)
    {
        DateTime now = DateTime.Today;
        int age = now.Year - bday.Year;            
        if (bday.AddYears(age) > now) 
            age--;
        return age;
    }

I've also made it into a function for the sake of clarity.

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I want to add Hebrew calendar calculations (or other System.Globalization calendar can be used in the same way), using rewrited functions from this thread:

   Public Shared Function CalculateAge(BirthDate As DateTime) As Integer
        Dim HebCal As New System.Globalization.HebrewCalendar ()
        Dim now = DateTime.Now()
        Dim iAge = HebCal.GetYear(now) - HebCal.GetYear(BirthDate)
        Dim iNowMonth = HebCal.GetMonth(now), iBirthMonth = HebCal.GetMonth(BirthDate)
        If iNowMonth < iBirthMonth Or (iNowMonth = iBirthMonth AndAlso HebCal.GetDayOfMonth(now) < HebCal.GetDayOfMonth(BirthDate)) Then iAge -= 1
        Return iAge
    End Function
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Here is a very simple and easy to follow example.

private int CalculateAge()
{
//get birthdate
   DateTime dtBirth = Convert.ToDateTime(BirthDatePicker.Value);
   int byear = dtBirth.Year;
   int bmonth = dtBirth.Month;
   int bday = dtBirth.Day;
   DateTime dtToday = DateTime.Now;
   int tYear = dtToday.Year;
   int tmonth = dtToday.Month;
   int tday = dtToday.Day;
   int age = tYear - byear;
   if (bmonth < tmonth)
       age--;
   else if (bmonth == tmonth && bday>tday)
   {
       age--;
   }
return age;
}
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Would this work?

public override bool IsValid(DateTime value)
{
    _dateOfBirth =  value;
    var yearsOld = (double) (DateTime.Now.Subtract(_dateOfBirth).TotalDays/365);
    if (yearsOld > 18)
        return true;
     return false; 
}
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1  
Wow. Why is value an object rather than a DateTime? The method signature should be public override bool Is18OrOlder(DateTime birthday) What about people who were born on February 29? Who said that we were trying to check whether or not the user was at least 18 years old? The question was "how do I calculate someone's age?" –  Chris Shouts May 4 '10 at 20:57

How come the MSDN help did not tell you that? It looks so obvious:

System.DateTime birthTime = AskTheUser(myUser); // :-)
System.DateTime now = System.DateTime.Now;
System.TimeSpan age = now - birthTime; //as simple as that
double ageInDays = age.TotalDays; // will you convert to whatever you want yourself?
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Try this solution, it's working.

int age = (Int32.Parse(DateTime.Today.ToString("yyyyMMdd")) - 
           Int32.Parse(birthday.ToString("yyyyMMdd rawrrr"))) / 10000;
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This classic question is deserving of a Noda Time solution.

static int GetAge(LocalDate dateOfBirth)
{
    Instant now = SystemClock.Instance.Now;

    // The target time zone is important.
    // It should align with the *current physical location* of the person
    // you are talking about.  When the whereabouts of that person are unknown,
    // then you use the time zone of the person who is *asking* for the age.
    // The time zone of birth is irrelevant!

    DateTimeZone zone = DateTimeZoneProviders.Tzdb["America/New_York"];

    LocalDate today = now.InZone(zone).Date;

    Period period = Period.Between(dateOfBirth, today, PeriodUnits.Years);

    return (int) period.Years;
}

Usage:

LocalDate dateOfBirth = new LocalDate(1976, 8, 27);
int age = GetAge(dateOfBirth);

You might also be interested in the following improvements:

  • Passing in the clock as an IClock, instead of using SystemClock.Instance, would improve testability.

  • The target time zone will likely change, so you'd want a DateTimeZone parameter as well.

See also my blog post on this subject: Handling Birthdays, and Other Anniversaries

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Here's a little code sample for C# I knocked up, be careful around the edge cases specifically leap years, not all the above solutions take them into account. Pushing the answer out as a DateTime can cause problems as you could end up trying to put too many days into a specific month e.g. 30 days in Feb.

public string LoopAge(DateTime myDOB, DateTime FutureDate)
{
    int years = 0;
    int months = 0;
    int days = 0;

    DateTime tmpMyDOB = new DateTime(myDOB.Year, myDOB.Month, 1);

    DateTime tmpFutureDate = new DateTime(FutureDate.Year, FutureDate.Month, 1);

    while (tmpMyDOB.AddYears(years).AddMonths(months) < tmpFutureDate)
    {
    	months++;
    	if (months > 12)
    	{
    		years++;
    		months = months - 12;
    	}
    }

    if (FutureDate.Day >= myDOB.Day)
    {
    	days = days + FutureDate.Day - myDOB.Day;
    }
    else
    {
    	months--;
    	if (months < 0)
    	{
    		years--;
    		months = months + 12;
    	}
    	days = days + (DateTime.DaysInMonth(FutureDate.AddMonths(-1).Year, FutureDate.AddMonths(-1).Month) + FutureDate.Day) - myDOB.Day;

    }

    //add an extra day if the dob is a leap day
    if (DateTime.IsLeapYear(myDOB.Year) && myDOB.Month == 2 && myDOB.Day == 29)
    {
    	//but only if the future date is less than 1st March
    	if(FutureDate >= new DateTime(FutureDate.Year, 3,1))
    		days++;
    }

    return "Years: " + years + " Months: " + months + " Days: " + days;
}
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1  
I like this solution the best, however, when calculating the months, it needs to be if(months >= 12). Try 6-8-2012 - 6-4-1993 to test. –  Jerry Jun 8 '12 at 19:43

I've created an Age struct, which looks like this:

public struct Age : IEquatable<Age>, IComparable<Age>
{
    private readonly int _years;
    private readonly int _months;
    private readonly int _days;

    public int Years  { get { return _years; } }
    public int Months { get { return _months; } }
    public int Days { get { return _days; } }

    public Age( int years, int months, int days ) : this()
    {
        _years = years;
        _months = months;
        _days = days;
    }

    public static Age CalculateAge( DateTime dateOfBirth, DateTime date )
    {
        // Here is some logic that ressembles Mike's solution, although it
        // also takes into account months & days.
        // Ommitted for brevity.
        return new Age (years, months, days);
    }

    // Ommited Equality, Comparable, GetHashCode, functionality for brevity.
}
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With less conversions and UtcNow, this code can take care of someone born on the Feb 29 on a leap year:

public int GetAge(DateTime DateOfBirth)
{
    var Now = DateTime.UtcNow;
    return Now.Year - DateOfBirth.Year -
        (
            (
                Now.Month > DateOfBirth.Month ||
                (Now.Month == DateOfBirth.Month && Now.Day >= DateOfBirth.Day)
            ) ? 0 : 1
        );
}
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Seems most of codes are very large , So I have here a small code and that will give you the result that you are expecting

int _output = new DateTime
(
DateTime.Now.Subtract(person_sBirthDate).Ticks
).Year -1;
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To calculate the age with nearest age:

var ts = DateTime.Now - new DateTime(1988, 3, 19);
var age = Math.Round(ts.Days / 365.0);
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int age = DateTime.Now.Year - birthday.Year;
if (DateTime.Now.Month < birthday.Month || DateTime.Now.Month == birthday.Month 
&& DateTime.Now.Day < birthday.Day) age--;
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A one Linear Answer,

    DateTime dateOfBirth = Convert.ToDateTime("01/16/1990");
    var age = ((DateTime.Now - dateOfBirth).Days) / 365;
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