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Given a DateTime representing a person's birthday, how do I calculate their age?

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419  
Do we need to account in our code for cases where the person in question have travelled large distances near the speed of light? –  JTew Mar 25 '11 at 4:04
65  
what all of the answers so far have missed is that it depends where the person was born and where they are right now. –  Yaur May 21 '11 at 7:34
14  
@Yaur: Just convert the time of now + birth into GMT/UTC, age is only a relative value, hence timezones are irrelevant. For determining the user's current timezone, you can use GeoLocating. –  Stefan Steiger Oct 3 '11 at 10:20

52 Answers 52

up vote 956 down vote accepted

For some reason Jeff's code didn't seem simple enough. To me this seems simpler and easier to understand:

DateTime today = DateTime.Today;
int age = today.Year - bday.Year;
if (bday > today.AddYears(-age)) age--;

However, this assumes you are looking for the western idea of age and not using East Asian reckoning.

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113  
Just wanted to comment on DateTime.Now performance. If you don't need an accurate time zone value, use DateTime.UtcNow it's much faster. –  JAG Jan 22 '09 at 10:29
52  
Given we're talking birthdays you can just use DateTime.Today given the time part has no relevance. –  Tristan Warner-Smith Jul 24 '09 at 18:04
39  
This answer does not work with all locales and all ages. Several countries have skipped dates after the birth of current living people, including Russia (1918), Greece (1924) and Turkey (1926). –  Lars D Nov 9 '09 at 22:09
11  
Actually, it's still not entirely correct. This code presumes that 'bday' is the date-portion of a DateTime. It's an edge-case (I guess most people will just be passing dates and not date-times), but if you pass in a birthday as a date-and-time where the time is greater than 00:00:00 then you'll run into the bug Danvil pointed out. Setting bday = bday.Date fixes this. –  Øyvind Nov 16 '10 at 15:37
26  
The last line made me think too much. Instead how about: if (bday.AddYears(age) > now) age--; This seems to be a more intuitive expression. –  cdiggins Jul 16 '11 at 17:53

I do not like many of the answers here because they take several lines of code to do what should be a very simple datemath calculation (please save all your comments about age calculation in other cultures unless you want to post an answer that covers them). My one liner, using simple datemath and math functions that exist in c#, sqlserver, mysql, etc. is:

year(@today)-year(@birthDate)+floor((month(@today)-month(@birthdate)+floor((day(@today)-day(@birthdate))/31))/12)

But I also very much like Mathew's answer above. Either way is much more efficient than the other answers given here.

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I would simply do this:

DateTime birthDay = new DateTime(1990, 05, 23);
DateTime age = DateTime.Now - birthDay;

This way you can calculate the exact age of a person, down to the millisecond if you want.

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Why can't it be this simple?

int age = DateTime.Now.AddTicks(0 - dob.Ticks).Year - 1;
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Here is a function that is serving me well... No calcs, very simple.

    public static string ToAge(this DateTime dob, DateTime? toDate = null)
    {
        if (!toDate.HasValue)
            toDate = DateTime.Now;
        var now = toDate.Value;

        if (now.CompareTo(dob) < 0)
            return "Future date";

        int years = now.Year - dob.Year;
        int months = now.Month - dob.Month;
        int days = now.Day - dob.Day;

        if (days < 0)
        {
            months--;
            days = DateTime.DaysInMonth(dob.Year, dob.Month) - dob.Day + now.Day;
        }

        if (months < 0)
        {
            years--;
            months = 12 + months;
        }


        return string.Format("{0} year(s), {1} month(s), {2} days(s)",
            years,
            months,
            days);
    }

And here is a unit test:

    [Test]
    public void ToAgeTests()
    {
        var date = new DateTime(2000, 1, 1);
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 0 month(s), 1 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 12, 31).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 0 month(s), 0 days(s)", new DateTime(2000, 1, 1).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("1 year(s), 0 month(s), 0 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 1, 1).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 11 month(s), 0 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 2, 1).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 10 month(s), 25 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 2, 4).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 10 month(s), 1 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 2, 28).ToAge(date));

        date = new DateTime(2000, 2, 15);
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 0 month(s), 28 days(s)", new DateTime(2000, 1, 18).ToAge(date));
    }
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I use this:

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static int Age(this DateTime birthDate)
    {
        return Age(birthDate, DateTime.Now);
    }

    public static int Age(this DateTime birthDate, DateTime offsetDate)
    {
        int result=0;
        result = offsetDate.Year - birthDate.Year;

        if (offsetDate.DayOfYear < birthDate.DayOfYear)
        {
              result--;
        }

        return result;
    }
}
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The simple answer to this is to apply AddYears as shown below because this is the only native method to add years to the 29th of Feb. of leap years and obtain the correct result of the 28th of Feb. for common years.

Some feel that 1th of Mar. is the birthday of leaplings but neither .Net nor any official rule supports this, nor does common logic explain why some born in February should have 75% of their birthdays in another month.

Further, an Age method lends itself to be added as an extension to DateTime. By this you can obtain the age in the simplest possible way:

  1. List item

int age = birthDate.Age();

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Calculates the age in years of the current System.DateTime object today.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="birthDate">The date of birth</param>
    /// <returns>Age in years today. 0 is returned for a future date of birth.</returns>
    public static int Age(this DateTime birthDate)
    {
        return Age(birthDate, DateTime.Today);
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// Calculates the age in years of the current System.DateTime object on a later date.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="birthDate">The date of birth</param>
    /// <param name="laterDate">The date on which to calculate the age.</param>
    /// <returns>Age in years on a later day. 0 is returned as minimum.</returns>
    public static int Age(this DateTime birthDate, DateTime laterDate)
    {
        int age;
        age = laterDate.Year - birthDate.Year;
        if (age > 0)
        {
            age -= Convert.ToInt32(laterDate.Date < birthDate.Date.AddYears(age));
        }
        else
        {
            age = 0;
        }
        return age;
    }
}

}

Now, run this test:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        RunTest();
    }

    private static void RunTest()
    {
        DateTime birthDate = new DateTime(2000, 2, 28);
        DateTime laterDate = new DateTime(2011, 2, 27);
        string iso = "yyyy-MM-dd";
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Birth date: " + birthDate.AddDays(i).ToString(iso) + "  Later date: " + laterDate.AddDays(j).ToString(iso) + "  Age: " + birthDate.AddDays(i).Age(laterDate.AddDays(j)).ToString());
            }
        }
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

The critical date example is this:

Birth date: 2000-02-29 Later date: 2011-02-28 Age: 11

Output:

{
    Birth date: 2000-02-28  Later date: 2011-02-27  Age: 10
    Birth date: 2000-02-28  Later date: 2011-02-28  Age: 11
    Birth date: 2000-02-28  Later date: 2011-03-01  Age: 11
    Birth date: 2000-02-29  Later date: 2011-02-27  Age: 10
    Birth date: 2000-02-29  Later date: 2011-02-28  Age: 11
    Birth date: 2000-02-29  Later date: 2011-03-01  Age: 11
    Birth date: 2000-03-01  Later date: 2011-02-27  Age: 10
    Birth date: 2000-03-01  Later date: 2011-02-28  Age: 10
    Birth date: 2000-03-01  Later date: 2011-03-01  Age: 11
}

And for the later date 2012-02-28:

{
    Birth date: 2000-02-28  Later date: 2012-02-28  Age: 12
    Birth date: 2000-02-28  Later date: 2012-02-29  Age: 12
    Birth date: 2000-02-28  Later date: 2012-03-01  Age: 12
    Birth date: 2000-02-29  Later date: 2012-02-28  Age: 11
    Birth date: 2000-02-29  Later date: 2012-02-29  Age: 12
    Birth date: 2000-02-29  Later date: 2012-03-01  Age: 12
    Birth date: 2000-03-01  Later date: 2012-02-28  Age: 11
    Birth date: 2000-03-01  Later date: 2012-02-29  Age: 11
    Birth date: 2000-03-01  Later date: 2012-03-01  Age: 12
}
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12  
I was about to downvote this question because this solution handles February 29 birth dates by increasing their age by one on February 28 in non-leap years. However, asking around I discovered that people born on February 29 will celebrate their birthday February 28 if needed (this is probably culture specific though). I'm curious how for instance air plane companies that sell differently priced tickets based on age handles this. Will you have to pay the full price already on February 28 or will you still get the child discount? –  Martin Liversage Jan 11 '12 at 17:42

Check this out:

TimeSpan ts = DateTime.Now.Subtract(Birthdate);
age = (byte)(ts.TotalDays / 365.25);
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Just because I don't think the top answer is that clear:

public static int GetAgeByLoop(DateTime birthday)
{
    var age = -1;

    for (var date = birthday; date < DateTime.Today; date = date.AddYears(1))
        age++;

    return age;
}
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This is one of the most accurate answer that is able to resolve the birthday of 29th of Feb compare to any year of 28th Feb.

public int GetAge(DateTime birthDate)
{
    int age = DateTime.Now.Year - birthDate.Year;
    if (birthDate.DayOfYear > DateTime.Now.DayOfYear)
        age--;
    return age;
}
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A one Linear Answer,

    DateTime dateOfBirth = Convert.ToDateTime("01/16/1990");
    var age = ((DateTime.Now - dateOfBirth).Days) / 365;
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int age = DateTime.Now.Year - birthday.Year;
if (DateTime.Now.Month < birthday.Month || DateTime.Now.Month == birthday.Month 
&& DateTime.Now.Day < birthday.Day) age--;
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I don't know how the wrong solution can be accepted. The correct C# snippet was written by Michael Stum

Here is a test snippet:

DateTime bDay = new DateTime(2000, 2, 29);
DateTime now = new DateTime(2009, 2, 28);
MessageBox.Show(string.Format("Test {0} {1} {2}",
   CalculateAgeWrong1(bDay, now),     // outputs 9
   CalculateAgeWrong2(bDay, now),     // outputs 9
   CalculateAgeCorrect(bDay, now)));  // outputs 8

Here you have the methods:

public int CalculateAgeWrong1(DateTime birthDate, DateTime now)
{
    return new DateTime(now.Subtract(birthDate).Ticks).Year - 1;
}

public int CalculateAgeWrong2(DateTime birthDate, DateTime now)
{
    int age = now.Year - birthDate.Year;
    if (now < birthDate.AddYears(age)) age--;
    return age;
}

public int CalculateAgeCorrect(DateTime birthDate, DateTime now)
{
    int age = now.Year - birthDate.Year;
    if (now.Month < birthDate.Month || (now.Month == birthDate.Month && now.Day < birthDate.Day)) age--;
    return age;
}
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10  
And the outputs?? –  Mark Aug 12 '10 at 5:29
5  
Output was -Test 9 9 8 –  MoXplod Nov 29 '11 at 20:52
10  
While this code works, it asserts that a person born on a leap day attains the next year of age on March 1st on non-leap years, rather than on February 28th. In reality, either option may be correct. Wikipedia has something to say about this. So while your code is not "wrong", neither is the accepted solution. –  Matt Johnson Aug 17 '14 at 5:44
1  
public int CalculateAgeCorrect(DateTime birthDate, DateTime now) { int age = now.Year - birthDate.Year; if (now.Month > birthDate.Month) return age; if (now.Month < birthDate.Month) return age - 1; // now.Month == birthDate.Month if (now.Day < birthDate.Day)) return age - 1; return age; } –  Sergiu Mindras Nov 5 '14 at 9:20

This classic question is deserving of a Noda Time solution.

static int GetAge(LocalDate dateOfBirth)
{
    Instant now = SystemClock.Instance.Now;

    // The target time zone is important.
    // It should align with the *current physical location* of the person
    // you are talking about.  When the whereabouts of that person are unknown,
    // then you use the time zone of the person who is *asking* for the age.
    // The time zone of birth is irrelevant!

    DateTimeZone zone = DateTimeZoneProviders.Tzdb["America/New_York"];

    LocalDate today = now.InZone(zone).Date;

    Period period = Period.Between(dateOfBirth, today, PeriodUnits.Years);

    return (int) period.Years;
}

Usage:

LocalDate dateOfBirth = new LocalDate(1976, 8, 27);
int age = GetAge(dateOfBirth);

You might also be interested in the following improvements:

  • Passing in the clock as an IClock, instead of using SystemClock.Instance, would improve testability.

  • The target time zone will likely change, so you'd want a DateTimeZone parameter as well.

See also my blog post on this subject: Handling Birthdays, and Other Anniversaries

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The simplest way I've ever found is this. It works correctly for the US and western europe locales. Can't speak to other locales, especially places like China. 4 extra compares, at most, following the initial computation of age.

public int AgeInYears( DateTime birthDate , DateTime referenceDate )
{
  Debug.Assert( 
      referenceDate >= birthDate , 
      "birth date must be on or prior to the reference date" ) ;

  DateTime birth     = birthDate.Date     ;
  DateTime reference = referenceDate.Date ;
  int      years     = ( reference.Year - birth.Year ) ;

  //
  // an offset of -1 is applied if the birth date has 
  // not yet occurred in the current year.
  //
  if      ( reference.Month > birth.Month )         ;
  else if ( reference.Month < birth.Month ) --years ;
  else // in birth month
  {
    if ( reference.Day < birth.Day ) --years ;
  }

  return years ;

}

I was looking over the answers to this and noticed that nobody has made reference to regulatory/legal implications of leap day births. For instance, per Wikipedia, if you're born on February 29th in various jurisdictions, you're non-leap year birthday varies:

  • In the United Kingdom and Hong Kong: it's the ordinal day of the year, so the next day, March 1st is your birthday.
  • In New Zealand: it's the previous day, February 28th for the purposes of driver licencing, and March 1st for other purposes.
  • Taiwan: it's February 28th.

And as near as I can tell, in the US, the statutes are silent on the matter, leaving it up to the common law and to how various regulatory bodies define things in their regulations.

To that end, an improvement:

public enum LeapDayRule
{
  OrdinalDay     = 1 ,
  LastDayOfMonth = 2 ,
}

static int ComputeAgeInYears( DateTime birth , DateTime reference , LeapYearBirthdayRule ruleInEffect )
{
  bool     isLeapYearBirthday = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.Calendar.IsLeapDay( birth.Year , birth.Month , birth.Day ) ;
  DateTime cutoff         ;

  if ( isLeapYearBirthday && !DateTime.IsLeapYear(reference.Year) )
  {
    switch ( ruleInEffect )
    {
    case LeapDayRule.OrdinalDay     :
      cutoff = new DateTime( reference.Year , 1 , 1 )
               .AddDays( birth.DayOfYear-1 ) ;
      break ;
    case LeapDayRule.LastDayOfMonth :
      cutoff = new DateTime( reference.Year , birth.Month , 1 )
               .AddMonths(1)
               .AddDays(-1)
               ;
      break ;
    default :
      throw new InvalidOperationException() ;
    }
  }
  else
  {
    cutoff = new DateTime(reference.Year,birth.Month,birth.Day) ;
  }

  int age = ( reference.Year - birth.Year ) + ( reference >= cutoff ? 0 : -1 ) ;
  return age < 0 ? 0 : age ;
}

It should be noted that this code assumes:

  • A western (European) reckoning of age, and
  • A calendar, like the Gregorian calendar that inserts a single leap day at the end of a month.
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Try this solution, it's working.

int age = (Int32.Parse(DateTime.Today.ToString("yyyyMMdd")) - 
           Int32.Parse(birthday.ToString("yyyyMMdd rawrrr"))) / 10000;
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I have created a SQL Server User Defined Function to calculate someone's age, given their birthdate. This is useful when you need it as part of a query:

using System;
using System.Data;
using System.Data.Sql;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using System.Data.SqlTypes;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Server;

public partial class UserDefinedFunctions
{
    [SqlFunction(DataAccess = DataAccessKind.Read)]
    public static SqlInt32 CalculateAge(string strBirthDate)
    {
        DateTime dtBirthDate = new DateTime();
        dtBirthDate = Convert.ToDateTime(strBirthDate);
        DateTime dtToday = DateTime.Now;

        // get the difference in years
        int years = dtToday.Year - dtBirthDate.Year;
        // subtract another year if we're before the
        // birth day in the current year
        if (dtToday.Month < dtBirthDate.Month || (dtToday.Month == dtBirthDate.Month && dtToday.Day < dtBirthDate.Day))
            years=years-1;
        int intCustomerAge = years;
        return intCustomerAge;
    }
};
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I have a customized Function to calculate Age + a message if selected date in not matching //This function will validate the date

private bool ValidateDate(string dob)
    {
        DateTime dobdate = DateTime.Parse(dob);
        DateTime nowdate = DateTime.Now;
        TimeSpan ts = nowdate - dobdate;
        int Years = ts.Days / 365;
        if (Years < 18)
        {
            message = "Date of Birth must not be less then 18";
            return false;
        }
        else if (Years > 65)
        {
            message = "Date of Birth must not be greater then 65";
            return false;
        }
        dobvalue = dob;
        return true;
    }
  //Below here you call that function and pass out datetime value (MM/DD/YYYY) you can format by any way you like
  //Function Call
  if (ValidateDate("03/10/1982") == false)
     {
        lbldatemessaeg.Visible = true;
        lbldatemessaeg.Text = message; //you can replace anything a messagebox,or any container to display
        return;
     }
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To calculate the age with nearest age:

var ts = DateTime.Now - new DateTime(1988, 3, 19);
var age = Math.Round(ts.Days / 365.0);
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Seems most of codes are very large , So I have here a small code and that will give you the result that you are expecting

int _output = new DateTime
(
DateTime.Now.Subtract(person_sBirthDate).Ticks
).Year -1;
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This gives "more detail" to this question. Maybe this is what you're looking for

DateTime birth = new DateTime(1974, 8, 29);
DateTime today = DateTime.Now;
TimeSpan span = today - birth;
DateTime age = DateTime.MinValue + span;

// Make adjustment due to MinValue equalling 1/1/1
int years = age.Year - 1;
int months = age.Month - 1;
int days = age.Day - 1;

// Print out not only how many years old they are but give months and days as well
Console.Write("{0} years, {1} months, {2} days", years, months, days);
share|improve this answer
1  
timespan itself automatically takes into account leap years between 2 dates so I'm not sure what your getting on about. I have asked on microsoft forums and microsoft has confirmed it takes into account leap years between 2 dates. –  Jacqueline Loriault Oct 23 '13 at 19:29
2  
You are quite right it's not. But IF it was that would be the result. Why does it matter? It doesn't. In either case leap or not then there are examples where this does not work. That was what I wanted to show. The DIFF is correct. Span takes into account leap years. But ADDING to a base date is not. Try the examples in code and you will see I'm right. –  Athanasios Kataras Mar 18 at 18:20
TimeSpan diff = DateTime.Now - birthdayDateTime;
string age = String.Format("{0:%y} years, {0:%M} months, {0:%d}, days old", diff);

I'm not sure how exactly you'd like it returned to you, so I just made a readable string.

share|improve this answer

How come the MSDN help did not tell you that? It looks so obvious:

System.DateTime birthTime = AskTheUser(myUser); // :-)
System.DateTime now = System.DateTime.Now;
System.TimeSpan age = now - birthTime; //as simple as that
double ageInDays = age.TotalDays; // will you convert to whatever you want yourself?
share|improve this answer

With less conversions and UtcNow, this code can take care of someone born on the Feb 29 on a leap year:

public int GetAge(DateTime DateOfBirth)
{
    var Now = DateTime.UtcNow;
    return Now.Year - DateOfBirth.Year -
        (
            (
                Now.Month > DateOfBirth.Month ||
                (Now.Month == DateOfBirth.Month && Now.Day >= DateOfBirth.Day)
            ) ? 0 : 1
        );
}
share|improve this answer

My suggestion

int age = (int) ((DateTime.Now - bday).TotalDays/365.242199);

That seems to have the year changing on the right date. (I spot tested up to age 107)

share|improve this answer
3  
Where does 365.255 come from? I don't think this will work in general. –  dreeves Jan 18 '09 at 3:15
9  
365 for the days in a year. +0.25 for leap years. +0.005 for other corrections –  James Curran Jan 20 '09 at 16:04
13  
I don't think Harry Patch would have appreciated your spot-testing methodology: latimes.com/news/obituaries/… –  MusiGenesis Aug 1 '09 at 16:03
7  
The average length of a year in the Gregorian Calendar is 365.2425 days. –  dan04 Oct 6 '10 at 2:01
8  
^^ Because sometimes it's important. In my testing this fails on the persons birthday, it reports them younger than they are. –  DaRKoN_ Mar 25 '11 at 5:27

This is a strange way to do it, but if you format the date to yyyymmdd and subtract the date of birth from the current date then drop the last 4 digits you've got the age :)

I don't know C#, but I believe this will work in any language.

20080814 - 19800703 = 280111 

Drop the last 4 digits = 28.

C# Code:

var now = float.Parse(DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy.MMdd"));
var dob = float.Parse(dateOfBirth.ToString("yyyy.MMdd"));
var age = (int)(now - dob);

Or alternatively without all the type conversion in the form of an extension method. Error checking omitted:

public static Int32 GetAge(this DateTime dateOfBirth)
{
    var today = DateTime.Today;

    var a = (today.Year * 100 + today.Month) * 100 + today.Day;
    var b = (dateOfBirth.Year * 100 + dateOfBirth.Month) * 100 + dateOfBirth.Day;

    return (a - b) / 10000;
}
share|improve this answer
6  
there is a subtract method in the datetime class .... –  docesam Feb 27 '14 at 19:02
3  
Horray for yyyymmdd. The 1st database product I used on a Personal Computer (circa 1981) stored dates in this format. Date manipulation of any kind was so much easier. –  radarbob Nov 19 '14 at 19:43
1  
Actually this is great for usage on MS-SQL with datetime-fields (total days since 01-011900) –  Patrik Eckebrecht Jul 3 at 12:01
1  
They teach some pretty cool stuff at Hogwarts. –  AspNyc Jul 12 at 3:14

Another function, not my me but found on the web and a bit refined:

public static int GetAge(DateTime birthDate)
{
    DateTime n = DateTime.Now; // To avoid a race condition around midnight
    int age = n.Year - birthDate.Year;

    if (n.Month < birthDate.Month || (n.Month == birthDate.Month && n.Day < birthDate.Day))
    age--;

    return age;
}

Just two things that come into my mind: What about people from countries that do not use the gregorian calendar? DateTime.Now is in the server-specific culture i think. I have absolutely 0 knowledge about actually working with Asian calendars and I do not know if there is an easy way to convert dates between calendars, but just in case you're wondering about those chinese guys from the year 4660 :-)

share|improve this answer

Would this work?

public override bool IsValid(DateTime value)
{
    _dateOfBirth =  value;
    var yearsOld = (double) (DateTime.Now.Subtract(_dateOfBirth).TotalDays/365);
    if (yearsOld > 18)
        return true;
     return false; 
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Wow. Why is value an object rather than a DateTime? The method signature should be public override bool Is18OrOlder(DateTime birthday) What about people who were born on February 29? Who said that we were trying to check whether or not the user was at least 18 years old? The question was "how do I calculate someone's age?" –  Chris Shouts May 4 '10 at 20:57

Here's yet another answer:

public static int AgeInYears(DateTime birthday, DateTime today)
{
    return ((today.Year - birthday.Year) * 372 + (today.Month - birthday.Month) * 31 + (today.Day - birthday.Day)) / 372;
}

This has been extensively unit-tested. It does look a bit "magic". The number 372 is the number of days there would be in a year if every month had 31 days.

The explanation of why it works (lifted from here) is:

Let's set Yn = DateTime.Now.Year, Yb = birthday.Year, Mn = DateTime.Now.Month, Mb = birthday.Month, Dn = DateTime.Now.Day, Db = birthday.Day

age = Yn - Yb + (31*(Mn - Mb) + (Dn - Db)) / 372

We know that what we need is either Yn-Yb if the date has already been reached, Yn-Yb-1 if it has not.

a) If Mn<Mb, we have -341 <= 31*(Mn-Mb) <= -31 and -30 <= Dn-Db <= 30

-371 <= 31*(Mn - Mb) + (Dn - Db) <= -1

With integer division

(31*(Mn - Mb) + (Dn - Db)) / 372 = -1

b) If Mn=Mb and Dn<Db, we have 31*(Mn - Mb) = 0 and -30 <= Dn-Db <= -1

With integer division, again

(31*(Mn - Mb) + (Dn - Db)) / 372 = -1

c) If Mn>Mb, we have 31 <= 31*(Mn-Mb) <= 341 and -30 <= Dn-Db <= 30

1 <= 31*(Mn - Mb) + (Dn - Db) <= 371

With integer division

(31*(Mn - Mb) + (Dn - Db)) / 372 = 0

d) If Mn=Mb and Dn>Db, we have 31*(Mn - Mb) = 0 and 1 <= Dn-Db <= 30

With integer division, again

(31*(Mn - Mb) + (Dn - Db)) / 372 = 0

e) If Mn=Mb and Dn=Db, we have 31*(Mn - Mb) + Dn-Db = 0

and therefore (31*(Mn - Mb) + (Dn - Db)) / 372 = 0

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Here is a very simple and easy to follow example.

private int CalculateAge()
{
//get birthdate
   DateTime dtBirth = Convert.ToDateTime(BirthDatePicker.Value);
   int byear = dtBirth.Year;
   int bmonth = dtBirth.Month;
   int bday = dtBirth.Day;
   DateTime dtToday = DateTime.Now;
   int tYear = dtToday.Year;
   int tmonth = dtToday.Month;
   int tday = dtToday.Day;
   int age = tYear - byear;
   if (bmonth < tmonth)
       age--;
   else if (bmonth == tmonth && bday>tday)
   {
       age--;
   }
return age;
}
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protected by Community Aug 16 '11 at 22:54

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