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I am builing my numpy/scipy environment based on blas and lapack more or less based on this walk through.

When I am done, how can I check, that my numpy/scipy functions really do use the previously built blas/lapack functionalities?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Hey i think what you are searching for is this: system info

I compiled numpy/scipy with atlas and i can check this with:

    import numpy.distutils.system_info as sysinfo
    sysinfo.get_info('atlas')

Check the documentation for more commands.

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10  
This doesn't seem to show whether numpy currently uses ATLAS, just whether ATLAS will be linked against during the next numpy compilation. I had numpy compiled before ATLAS. It worked very slow until I recompiled numpy (sure thing), but both before and after numpy recompilation sysinfo.get_info('atlas') shown the same output. How to check the current state of affairs? –  dmytro Jan 19 '13 at 15:05
1  
How to interpret the output? –  EOL Nov 8 '13 at 11:50
    
You might have 'blas' instead of 'atlas' installed (this happens if you install openblas on debian based distros). –  Malcolm Nov 19 '13 at 19:24

The method numpy.__config__.show() outputs information about linkage gathered at build time. My output looks like this. I think it means I am using the BLAS/LAPACK that ships with Mac OS.

>>>import numpy as np
>>>np.__config__.show()

lapack_opt_info:
    extra_link_args = ['-Wl,-framework', '-Wl,Accelerate']
    extra_compile_args = ['-msse3']
    define_macros = [('NO_ATLAS_INFO', 3)]
blas_opt_info:
    extra_link_args = ['-Wl,-framework', '-Wl,Accelerate']
    extra_compile_args = ['-msse3', '-I/System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Headers']
    define_macros = [('NO_ATLAS_INFO', 3)]
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As it uses the dynamically loaded versions, you can just do this:

$ ldd anyoftheCmodules.so

where anyoftheCmodules.so could be, for example, numpy/core/_dotblas.so, which links to libblas.so.

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1  
What if there is no file numpy/core/_dotblas.so ? (see comment below talonmies answer) –  Woltan Jan 25 '12 at 12:12
1  
There must but a number of .so files in there. Just search inside the NumPy directory (say, using find /path/to/numpy -name "*.so"). A couple of those (_dotblas.so, lapack_lite.so under Ubuntu's precompiled one, for example) make use of BLAS/LAPACK –  Ricardo Cárdenes Jan 25 '12 at 12:18

You can use the link loader dependency tool to look at the C level hook components of your build and see whether they have external dependencies on your blas and lapack of choice. I am not near a linux box right now, but on an OS X machine you can do this inside the site-packages directory which holds the installations:

$ otool -L numpy/core/_dotblas.so 
numpy/core/_dotblas.so:
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 125.2.0)
    /System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Versions/A/vecLib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 268.0.1)

$ otool -L scipy/linalg/flapack.so 
scipy/linalg/flapack.so (architecture i386):
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/local/lib/libgcc_s.1.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 1.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 111.1.4)
    /System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Versions/A/vecLib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 242.0.0)
scipy/linalg/flapack.so (architecture ppc):
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/local/lib/libgcc_s.1.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 1.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 111.1.4)

$ otool -L scipy/linalg/fblas.so 
scipy/linalg/fblas.so (architecture i386):
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/local/lib/libgcc_s.1.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 1.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 111.1.4)
    /System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Versions/A/vecLib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 242.0.0)
scipy/linalg/fblas.so (architecture ppc):
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/local/lib/libgcc_s.1.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 1.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 111.1.4)

substitute ldd in place of otool on a gnu/Linux system and you should get the answers you need.

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What if there is no file numpy/core/_dotblas.so ? (see comment below Ricardos answer) –  Woltan Jan 25 '12 at 12:13
    
@Woltan: either something is seriously broken, or you are looking in the wrong place. On every Linux and OS X numpy install I have ever seen, there will be a _dotblas.so which is the interface wrapper to whatever blas has been used to build the distribution. On windows it will be called _dotblas.pyd, but the function is the same. –  talonmies Jan 25 '12 at 12:18
3  
It seems like _dotblas.so is only built if you're using a [atlas] section in site.cfg (and a CBLAS-enabled BLAS library). So, you should use that, even if you're not using ATLAS (except when you're using Intel MKL, that has a dedicated section). –  Kenneth Hoste May 10 '13 at 18:44
    
Indeed, when no BLAS is available when NumPy is built, it builds its own dot-product routines. These can be two orders of magnitude slower than ATLAS. –  larsmans Sep 1 '13 at 12:33

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