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We are developing a WPF application using TDD. As we're already working on this solution for almost two years, we've written a huge bunch of tests (almost 2000 Unittests right now).

There are some classes, that need to implement functionality multithreaded and asynchronously. For example a communication-component that can both send and receive messages and parse them. The dependencies are always mocked using RhinoMocks.

Our Test-Methods targeting these classes look very similar, as following:

[TestMethod]
public void Method_Description_ExpectedResult(){
  // Arrange
  var myStub = MockRepository.GenerateStub<IMyStub>();
  var target = new MyAsynchronousClass(myStub);

  // Act
  var target.Send("Foo");
  Thread.Sleep(200);

  //Assert
  myStub.AssertWasCalled(x => x.Bar("Foo"));
}

As you can see, this test runs at least for 200 ms due to the Thread.Sleep(). We optimized the test replacing the AssertWasCalled with a active polling method, s.th. like this:

public static bool True(Func<bool> condition, int times, int waitTime)
{
    for (var i = 0; i < times; i++)
    {
        if (condition())
            return true;
        Thread.Sleep(waitTime);
    }

    return condition();
}

We can now use this WaitFor.True(...) Method by changing the AssertWasCalled to:

var fooTriggered = false;
myStub.Stub(x => x.Bar("Foo")).Do((Action)(() => fooTriggered = true)));

WaitFor.True(() => fooTriggered, 20, 20);
Assert.IsTrue(fooTriggered);

This construct will terminate earlier if the condition matches, but anyway - this takes too long for us. Running all of our 2000 Tests need about 5 Minutes (building and running them).

Is there any smart trick how we could optimize code like this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a monitor. I'm making this up so please excuse me if it isn't quite compiling, but it'll look something like:

[TestMethod]
public void Method_Description_ExpectedResult(){
  // Arrange
  var waitingRoom = new object();
  var myStub = MockRepository.GenerateStub<IMyStub>();
  myStub.Setup(x => x.Bar("Foo")).Callback(x => 
      {
          Monitor.Enter(waitingRoom);
          Monitor.Pulse(waitingRoom);
          Monitor.Exit(waitingRoom);
      }

  var target = new MyAsynchronousClass(myStub);

  // Act

  Monitor.Enter(waitingRoom);
  target.Send("Foo");
  Monitor.Wait(waitingRoom);
  Monitor.Exit(waitingRoom);

  //Assert
  myStub.AssertWasCalled(x => x.Bar("Foo"));
}

Code written within the Monitor can't run until it's free. The test will cause the acting thread to wait until Monitor.Wait has been called. Then the callback can enter and pulse the Monitor. The test then "wakes up", and once the callback has exited the monitor, it gets control back and exits too, allowing you to Assert.

The only thing I haven't covered is that if Bar("Foo") doesn't get called it will hang, so you might want to have a timer pulse the thread too.

You can create a class which does the complex monitoring bits for you if you use it a lot. This is one I wrote to deal with asynchronous checks in UI automation; adapting it for what you're doing might help you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, i like this way of testing! Will try this one out. –  Guffel Jan 25 '12 at 12:38
    
Oh, look, I did Monitor.Wait(waitingRoom, <timeout>) - so no need to do weird timer gubbins. Nice. –  Lunivore Jan 25 '12 at 19:51

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