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I need a device version of the following host code:

double (**func)(double x);

double func1(double x)
{
 return x+1.;
}

double func2(double x)
{
 return x+2.;
}

double func3(double x)
{
 return x+3.;
}

void test(void)
{
 double x;

 for(int i=0;i<3;++i){
  x=func[i](2.0);
  printf("%g\n",x);
 }

}

int main(void)
{
 func=(double (**)(double))malloc(10*sizeof(double (*)(double)));

 test();

 return 0;
}

where func1, func2, func3 have to be __device__ functions and "test" has to be a (suitably modified) __global__ kernel.

I have a NVIDIA GeForce GTS 450 (compute capability 2.1) Thank you in advance Michele

========================================================

A working solution

#define REAL double

typedef REAL (*func)(REAL x);


__host__ __device__ REAL func1(REAL x)

{

return x+1.0f;

}


__host__ __device__ REAL func2(REAL x)

{

return x+2.0f;

}


__host__ __device__ REAL func3(REAL x)

{

return x+3.0f;

}


__device__ func func_list_d[3];

func func_list_h[3];


__global__ void assign_kernel(void)

{

    func_list_d[0]=func1;

    func_list_d[1]=func2;

    func_list_d[2]=func3;

}

void assign(void)

{

    func_list_h[0]=func1;

    func_list_h[1]=func2;

    func_list_h[2]=func3;

}


__global__ void test_kernel(void)

{

  REAL x;

  for(int i=0;i<3;++i){

   x=func_list_d[i](2.0);

   printf("%g\n",x);

  }

}


void test(void)

{

  REAL x;

  printf("=============\n");

  for(int i=0;i<3;++i){

   x=func_list_h[i](2.0);

   printf("%g\n",x);

  }

}


int main(void)

{

    assign_kernel<<<1,1>>>();

    test_kernel<<<1,1>>>();

    cudaThreadSynchronize();



    assign();

    test();



    return 0;

}
share|improve this question
    
Functions pointers are unsupported in a device code. –  Yappie Jan 25 '12 at 9:42
    
@Yappie: that is wrong - function pointers are supported on Fermi –  talonmies Jan 25 '12 at 10:06
    
There is a function pointer sample which ships in the CUDA SDK, and you can see an example which is very similar to your question in this post on the CUDA developer forums. –  talonmies Jan 25 '12 at 10:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

function pointers are allowed on Fermi. This is how you could do it:

typedef double (*func)(double x);

__device__ double func1(double x)
{
return x+1.0f;
}

__device__ double func2(double x)
{
return x+2.0f;
}

__device__ double func3(double x)
{
return x+3.0f;
}

__device__ func pfunc1 = func1;
__device__ func pfunc2 = func2;
__device__ func pfunc3 = func3;

__global__ void test_kernel(func* f, int n)
{
  double x;

  for(int i=0;i<n;++i){
   x=f[i](2.0);
   printf("%g\n",x);
  }
}

int main(void)
{
  int N = 5;
  func* h_f;
  func* d_f;
  h_f = (func*)malloc(N*sizeof(func));
  cudaMalloc((void**)&d_f,N*sizeof(func));

  cudaMemcpyFromSymbol( &h_f[0], pfunc1, sizeof(func));
  cudaMemcpyFromSymbol( &h_f[1], pfunc1, sizeof(func));
  cudaMemcpyFromSymbol( &h_f[2], pfunc2, sizeof(func));
  cudaMemcpyFromSymbol( &h_f[3], pfunc3, sizeof(func));
  cudaMemcpyFromSymbol( &h_f[4], pfunc3, sizeof(func));

  cudaMemcpy(d_f,h_f,N*sizeof(func),cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

  test_kernel<1,1>(d_f,N);

  cudaFree(d_f);
  free(h_f);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very very much!! Your answer has been very useful for me. Is it possible to dynamically allocate the array func_list ? –  micheletuttafesta Jan 25 '12 at 11:56
    
I have edited the code to illustrated how you could use dynamic allocation. –  brano Jan 25 '12 at 12:44
    
brano I am infinitely grateful to you for your help!! However I found this working solution... is it correct? I have to do the assignment of "func_list_d" in a kernel –  micheletuttafesta Jan 25 '12 at 13:30
    
The working solution is written below my original question –  micheletuttafesta Jan 25 '12 at 13:39
    
The above example works. If you want to assign d_f inside a kernel than you can do so. Just remove all cudaMemcpyFromSymbol and launch a kernel instead that writes to d_f and uses pfunc1,pfunc2,pfunc3. –  brano Jan 25 '12 at 13:43

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