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trying to learn the Resources plugin

From my understanding, it helps to define 'resources' such as css and javascript files and automatically pull them into your gsp's when needed. I understand how to create modules that can then be loaded in using tags etc.

The part im not understanding is this: http://grails-plugins.github.com/grails-resources/guide/4.%20Using%20resources.html#4.2%20Linking%20to%20images

So ive created a module called 'images' in Config.groovy as follows:

grails.resources.modules = {
    images {
        resource url:'/images/view.jpg', attrs:[width: 1280, height:720 , alt: 'my view']
        resource url:'/images/breakfast.jpg', attrs:[width: 1280, height:720, alt: 'breakfast']
    }
}

The resources are included in the .gsp page in the head section as follows:

<head>
  <r:require modules="jquery-ui, blueprint"/>
</head>

i know the resources have been successfully added to the head section because when i inspect the page source i see them there:

<link href="/ResourceTest/static/Aa7jV0N2qZjOz7TLZ9cl5cREIh2y5jJYV0ytn4nQg9r.jpg" rel="shortcut icon" width="1280" height="720" alt="my view" />
<link href="/ResourceTest/static/IpQBSjrYeLDdSUBGbP3jhf6Kkhvu1zV3XRtwWfKOIMn.jpg" rel="shortcut icon" width="1280" height="720" alt="breakfast" />

My question is this: how are the image resources then used? i mean i know if it was javascript, the importing of the resource gives you access to use the functions in the html code, but with regards to images, the site says "Once you have done this, using to reference them would automatically set the width, height and other attributes."

How? I've tried the following:

<r:img module="images">
<r:img alt="breakfast">

and a handful of others with no success

what does work is:

<r:img uri="/images/breakfast.jpg">

but this works regardless of whether or not you add the module with the r:require tag.. So whats the point of using this plugin for images then and how would i use it?

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1  
Doesn't it just add the width and height from the resources entry when you do <r:img uri="/images/breakfast.jpg">? At least that's what it says in the docs... –  tim_yates Jan 25 '12 at 12:06
    
if thats all it does - then thats cool i guess.. it just didnt make a difference when i commented the <r:require> tags out.. so i dunno –  Dave Anderson Jan 25 '12 at 12:28
    
I'm guessing it helps/processes stuff like caching, gzip etc in production mode –  Steven Sproat Jan 26 '12 at 3:17

1 Answer 1

The <r:img> tag works just fine with our without <r:require>; it even works with undeclared image resources.

The point of the require tag is to prevent resource duplication. So, for instance, suppose you have multiple javascript resources that rely on jQuery, and they're all required. Add another layer of complication: say you're actually pulling together different gsp templates via sitemesh, and they each have their own resource dependencies. If you just put the normal HTML code to reference those resources in the head of each gsp layout, you might get multiple instances of them in your page header, which could prove problematic. Using the resources plugin makes sure you only get one instance of the required resource.

See http://grails-plugins.github.io/grails-resources/ref/Tags/require.html and http://grails-plugins.github.io/grails-resources/ref/Tags/layoutResources.html.

With images, though, this is not really necessary. If you have an image more than once on a page, it's probably because you wanted it, or because you're applying redundant layouts and need to refactor a bit. So, you are correct that the require tag doesn't really do much for images called via <r:img>. This is simply because images are a different sort of resource, so they're treated differently. Don't sweat it. :)

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