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I am trying to create a "parent" class wich provides a common constructor and paramter types to all it's inherited classes. The only thing that changes between the inherited ones is the value of some static variables.

What is the best approach to accomplish this? This is my current attempt:

class Ball {
  public:
    virtual ~Ball();
    Ball ();

  protected:
    static string file;
    static int size;
    node shape;
};

class TenisBall: public Ball {};
class OtherBall: public Ball {};

Ball::Ball () {
  shape = // do something with file and size
};

Ball::~Ball () {
  delete shape;
};

string TenisBall::file = "SomeFile";
int TenisBall::size = 20;

string OtherBall::file = "OtherFile";
int OtherBall::size = 16;

My problem is: I cannot set the static values on the TenisBall and OtherBall class, the compiler only accepts if I change TenisBall and OtherBall for Ball in the last two lines of code. How can I accomplish this? Is this the best approach?

EDIT:

Following the answers provided, I decided to try to implement it using virtual functions. Here is my code so far:

class Ball {
  public:
    Ball () {
      shape = // do something with getSize and getFile
    };

    ~Ball () {
      delete shape;
    };

  protected:
    virtual string getFile(){ return "Fake"; };
    virtual int getSize(){ return 10; };

    node shape;
};

class TenisBall: public Ball {
  int getSize() { return 16; };
  string getFile() { return "TennisBall.jpg"; };
};

int main() {
  TenisBall ball;
  return 1;
};

But, while my editor (xCode) does not gives any error, when trying to compile, llvm gives the following error:

invalid character '_' in Bundle Identifier at column 22. This string must be a uniform type identifier (UTI) that contains only alphanumeric (A-Z,a-z,0-9), hyphen (-), and period (.) characters.

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1  
imo the correct design here is to not use static members at all (are all your balls of the same size and all looking exactly the same? I doubt it) –  stijn Jan 25 '12 at 12:55
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/998247/… - static members don't behave like you thing wrt inheritance. –  Mat Jan 25 '12 at 12:57
    
Base class shares its static variables with its derived classes. It does not make sense to initialize them in a derived class. –  Dmitry Shkuropatsky Jan 25 '12 at 13:04
    
@stijn Yes all my TennisBalls are of the same size, all my OtherBalls are of the same size,... etc. –  Jaliborc Jan 25 '12 at 13:13
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3 Answers

What you try is not possible. Once a static variable is declared in a class, there is only one variable for this class and even derived classes cannot change this (so you can't change Ball::file to do something different for TennisBall whatever that could mean).

The easiest workaround would probably be changing Ball::file to a virtual function (returning a string or string& to something that could even be class- or function- static) that you can override in a derived class.

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Ok, if that is the only way, it will have to do. Thank you! –  Jaliborc Jan 25 '12 at 13:12
    
I am not being able to implement it trough your approach. I edited my initial question. –  Jaliborc Jan 25 '12 at 13:32
    
Ups: no, forget my last comment, I had two main functions. –  Jaliborc Jan 25 '12 at 14:41
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If you want each derived class to have it's own static variable, you can make the basse class a template and use CRTP:

template<typename T>
class Ball {
    static int size;
};

template<typename T> int Ball<T>::size = 0;

class TennisBall : public Ball<TennisBall> {

};

template<> int Ball<TennisBall>::size = 42;
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Good idea, but it still trows me the exact same error as when using virtual functions. –  Jaliborc Jan 25 '12 at 14:30
    
Ups: no, forget it, I had two different main functions. –  Jaliborc Jan 25 '12 at 14:40
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Obviously statics are a no-no here, if you do use them then you have one copy of the data in memory no matter how many instances of the derived classes you have, so you end up overwriting the data everytime.

How about something like below, one common constructor in Ball that handles the size and filename?

class Ball {
  public:
    virtual ~Ball();
    Ball ();
    Ball (int curr_size, string curr_filename);

  protected:
    string file;
    int size;
    node shape;
};

class TenisBall: public Ball {
   TennisBall(int size, string filename)
     :this(curr_size, curr_filename)
   {
   }


};
class OtherBall: public Ball {
   OtherBall(int size, string filename)
     : this(curr_size, curr_filename)
   {
   }

};

Ball::Ball () {
  shape = // do something with file and size
};

Ball::Ball(int curr_size, string curr_filename) {
    shape = // whatever
    curr_size = size;
    curr_filename = filename;
}

Ball::~Ball () {
  delete shape;
};

// ....
Ball *b = new TennisBall(16, "c:/tennisball_photo.jpg");

delete b;
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