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My question is difficult to describe, and I have two tables containing lots of numbers respectively; for one table, I search format through index

table1   index format  
        +------+----+                        
        |0~19  |  0 |
        |      |    |
        +------+----+
        |20~29 |  1 |
        |      |    |
        +------+----+
        |30~39 |  2 |
        |      |    |
        +------+----+

table2  index  resource(f,t0,t1,t2)  
                  0           1        2         3 (configure type)
        +----+-----------+---------+---------+                      
        |0   | (0,1,0,2) |(0,1,0,1)|(0,1,0,0)|
        +----+-----------+---------+---------+
        |1   | (0,2,0,2) |(0,2,0,1)|(0,2,0,0)|
        +----+-----------+---------+---------+
        |--  | (0,0,1,2) |(0,0,1,1)|(1,0,0,0)|
        +----+-----------+---------+---------+
        |19  | (0,0,0,0) |(0,0,0,0)|(0,0,1,1)|
        +----+-----------+---------+---------+---------+
        |--  | (0,0,0,2) |(0,0,0,1)|(0,0,1,0)|(0,2,1,0)|
        +----+-----------+---------+---------+---------+
        |29  | (0,1,0,2) |(0,1,0,1)|(0,1,0,1)|(0,1,0,1)|
        +----+-----------+---------+---------+---------+

Hopefully,the following code snippet can make me understood,

typedef struct my_struct {
    int f;
    int t0;
    int t1;
    int t2;
} my_struct;

// for index 0 ~ 19, the following is code snippet
    my_struct format0[2][3] = {
        {{0, 1, 0, 2}, {0, 1, 0, 1},{0, 1, 0, 0}}, // index 0
        {{0, 2, 0, 2}, {0, 2, 0, 1},{0, 2, 0, 0}}  // index 1
    };

// for index 20 ~ 29, the following is code snippet    
my_struct format1[1][4] = {
    {{0,0,0,2},{0,0,0,1},{0,0,1,0},{0,2,1,0}} // index 20
};

I have multiple 2d arrays containing resources grouped by format, each has different dimensions for different format, rowed by index, coled by configure type like 0,1,2..6, so I want to put them into another 1d array in order to look up easily through index, and get resource finally, but I don't know how.

I have tried the following but failed:

my_struct* group[] = {
    format0,
    format1
};

then using group[0], I can get format0, but I find it forgot its [1][2] which I need to know, so I am wondering there is some solution help me do that?

share|improve this question
    
your initialization of format0 is wrong, my_struct format0[1][2] = {{0, 1}}; –  Mr.Anubis Jan 25 '12 at 14:10
    
How do you have the dimensions of each array? I mean where do you get them from? –  Tamer Shlash Jan 25 '12 at 14:15
    
hi TAMER, I have a table hold a lot of numbers, they have inner relations to each other, the dimensions is got from that table –  tiplip Jan 25 '12 at 14:26

4 Answers 4

If you’re actually using C++ and not C, then you can use a more C++-centric solution, with std::vector and C++11 initialiser lists:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using std::cout;
using std::vector;

typedef struct my_struct {
    int i;
    int j;
    int k;
} my_struct;

typedef vector<vector<my_struct>> Matrix;

Matrix format0 {
    {{0, 1, 2}, {1, 2, 3}}
};

Matrix format1 {
    {{0, 1, 2}, {1, 2, 3}, {2, 3, 4}},
    {{3, 4, 5}, {4, 5, 6}, {5, 6, 7}}
};

vector<Matrix*> groups { &format0, &format1 };

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    for (auto i = groups.begin(); i != groups.end(); ++i)
        cout << (**i).size() << 'x' << (**i)[0].size() << '\n';
}

But this is still unusual, and I’m not sure what problem you’re really trying to solve. If what you need is a proper Matrix class, then you should write one so you can stop dealing with raw arrays and focus on what you really want to do.

share|improve this answer

Assuming that you have each the arrays dimensions in two arrays d1 (for the number of rows) and d2 (for the number of columns), you can do this:

struct foo {
    my_struct** arr;
    int dim1;
            int dim2;
};

foo group[dimension] = {
    {format0,d1[0],d2[0]},
    {format1,d1[1],d2[1]},
};

Thus you keep the array's dimension close, and can use them like this for example:

for (int i = 0;i<dimension;i++)
{
    for(int j = 0;j<group[i].dim1;j++)
    {
        for (int k=0;k<group[i].dim2;k++)
        {
            group[i].arr[j][k]; // do something with it!
        }
    }
}

Otherwise if you don't have the dimensions in d1, d2 and dimension, it's not possible to know them later after the arrays are define, and thus you won't be able to search (as you say you want to do).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, TAMER, thanks for your reply; I also thought to define another struct to hold all of that I need, your answer confirms my idea. –  tiplip Jan 25 '12 at 14:31
    
You won't be able to access arr[j][k] like that, it is just a pointer. You will need a function to calculate the linear index into arr. –  Jonathan Jan 25 '12 at 14:36
    
@Jonathan: Yes I can, arrays are in fact pointers, you can always use the [ ] operator with pointers. –  Tamer Shlash Jan 25 '12 at 14:44
    
True, and since you edited it to be my_struct **, now you can access arr[][]> However, now the initialization won't work, since it will treat format0 as an array of pointers, which it is not. –  Jonathan Jan 25 '12 at 14:51
    
True, but I'm assuming that format0, format1, etc.. are also pointers because he should be reading the dimensions and thus dynamically allocating these arrays, otherwise the program seems useless. –  Tamer Shlash Jan 25 '12 at 15:01

By treating group as an array of pointers you lose the ability to access the pointers as 2D arrays.

One option is to use only 1D arrays:

my_struct format00[3] = {{1,2,3}, {4,5,6}, {7,8,9}};
my_struct format01[3] = {{10,20,30}, {40,50,60}, {70,80,90}};

my_struct *format0[2] = {format00, format01};
my_struct *format1[2] = {format10, format11};

my_struct **group[] = {format0, format1};

my_struct a = group[0][0][1];  // {4,5,6}

Of course, this is much less convenient to initialize.

share|improve this answer
    
One of the other suggestions about using a struct for your matrices rather than simple arrays is certainly safer and preferred. –  Jonathan Jan 25 '12 at 14:27
    
thanks, you mean array will decay into pointers and lose its dimensions when I put them into another array as element, right? –  tiplip Jan 26 '12 at 9:21

Your struct doesn't seem to contain much in the way of actual arrays/matrices.

I'd use something like this:

typedef struct
{
  size_t width, height;
  int    *data;
} Matrix2D;

then define a function to initialize an instance:

int matrix2d_new(Matrix2D *out, size_t width, size_t height)
{
  if(out == NULL || width == 0 || height == 0)
    return 0;
  if((out->data = malloc(width * height * sizeof *out->data)) != NULL)
  {
    out->width = width;
    out->height = height;
    memset(out->data, 0, width * height * sizeof *out->data);
  }
  return out != NULL;
}

then you can build an array trivially:

Matrix2D matrices[3];
matrix2d_new(&matrices[0], 12, 34);
matrix2d_new(&matrices[1], 40, 50);
matrix2d_new(&matrices[2], 20, 50);

Error-checking is ignored, but must of course be considered when dealing with dynamic memory.

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