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I'm trying to read a single character from a stream. With the following code I get a "ambiguous overload" compiler error (GCC 4.3.2, and 4.3.4). What I'm doing wrong?

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    char c;
    std::istringstream("a") >> c;
    return 0;
}

Remarks:

  • Visual Studio 2008 compiles without errors
  • Other types (int, double) are working
  • If I first create a variable std::istringstream iss("a"); iss >> c, the compiler gives no error
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Actually, in your third bullet point, that's where you're finally not creating a temporary variable. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 25 '12 at 14:31
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Thanks, I corrected the last point. –  Christian Ammer Jan 25 '12 at 14:35
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The extraction operator >> for characters is a non-member function template:

template<class charT, class traits>
  basic_istream<charT,traits>& operator>>(basic_istream<charT,traits>&, charT&);

Since this takes its first argument by non-const reference, you can't use a temporary rvalue there. Therefore, your code cannot select this overload, only the various member function overloads, none of which match this usage.

Your code is valid in C++11, because there is also an extraction operator taking an rvalue reference as the first argument.

Visual Studio 2008 compiles without errors

One of that compiler's many non-standard extensions is to allow temporary rvalues to be bound to non-const references.

Other types (int, double) are working

Most extraction operators for fundamental types are member functions, which can be called on a temporary rvalue.

If I first create a variable std::istringstream iss("a"); iss >> c, the compiler gives no error

iss is a non-temporary lvalue, so it can be bound to a non-const reference.

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I remember that visual studio has extension which can bind rvalue to non-const lvalue ref , but that extension gives warning in VS which is ignored by asker I guess. Anyways +1 for such a nice answer :) –  Mr.Anubis Jan 25 '12 at 14:33
    
@Mr.Anubis: I don't get a warning for this program. I don't get a warning for std::istringstream& ss = std::istringstream("a"); either –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 25 '12 at 14:41
    
@Mr.Anubis: After your comment I compiled it again with no warnings! But after changing the warning level from /W3 (which seems to be default) to /W4 I got a such warning. –  Christian Ammer Jan 25 '12 at 14:42
    
@ChristianAmmer: Okie doke. That's a shame. Silly MSVC. That code should warn on the lowest level! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 25 '12 at 14:43
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: it depends if you favor pedantry over pragmatism. The code works, it's just non-portable. I suppose there exist a specific portability switch equivalent to -pedantic that would diagnose those cases. –  Matthieu M. Jan 25 '12 at 15:03
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The signature for the operator>> reading a char is

template<class charT, class traits>
basic_istream<charT,traits>& operator>>(basic_istream<charT,traits>& in,charT& c);

According to the language rules, a temporary cannot bind to the first parameter as a temporary cannot bind to a non-const reference.

Visual Studio 2008 allows this as an MS extension. Later versions will warn you that it is not allowed.

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