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The following (toy) program returns different things when linked against libstdc++ and libc++. Is this a bug in libc++ or do I not understand how istream eof() works? I have tried running it using g++ on linux and mac os x and clang on mac os x, with and without -std=c++0x. It was my impression that eof() does not return true until an attempt to read (by get() or something else) actually fails. This is how libstdc++ behaves, but not how libc++ behaves.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int main() {
    std::stringstream s;

    s << "a";

    std::cout << "EOF? " << (s.eof() ? "T" : "F") << std::endl;
    std::cout << "get: " << s.get() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "EOF? " << (s.eof() ? "T" : "F") << std::endl;

return 0;
}

Thor:~$ g++ test.cpp
Thor:~$ ./a.out
EOF? F
get: 97
EOF? F
Thor:~$ clang++ -std=c++0x -stdlib=libstdc++ test.cpp 
Thor:~$ ./a.out
EOF? F
get: 97
EOF? F
Thor:~$ clang++ -std=c++0x -stdlib=libc++ test.cpp 
Thor:~$ ./a.out
EOF? F
get: 97
EOF? T
Thor:~$ clang++ -stdlib=libc++ test.cpp 
Thor:~$ ./a.out
EOF? F
get: 97
EOF? T
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This was a libc++ bug and has been fixed as Cubbi noted. My bad. Details are here:

http://lwg.github.io/issues/lwg-closed.html#2036

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I should have checked other answers sooner! –  Cubbi Jan 26 '12 at 17:45
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EDIT: This was due to the way older versions of libc++ interpreted the C++ standard. The interpretation was discussed in LWG issue 2036, it was ruled to be incorrect and libc++ was changed.

Current libc++ gives the same results on your test as libstdc++.

old answer:

Your understanding is correct.

istream::get() does the following:

  1. Calls good(), and sets failbit if it returns false (this adds a failbit to a stream that had some other bit set), (§27.7.2.1.2[istream::sentry]/2)
  2. Flushes whatever's tie()'d if necessary
  3. If good() is false at this point, returns eof and does nothing else.
  4. Extracts a character as if by calling rdbuf()->sbumpc() or rdbuf()->sgetc() (§27.7.2.1[istream]/2)
  5. If sbumpc() or sgetc() returned eof, sets eofbit. (§27.7.2.1[istream]/3) and failbit (§27.7.2.2.3[istream.unformatted]/4)
  6. If an exception was thrown, sets badbit (§27.7.2.2.3[istream.unformatted]/1) and rethrows if allowed.
  7. Updates gcount and returns the character (or eof if it couldn't be obtained).

(chapters quoted from C++11, but C++03 has all the same rules, under §27.6.*)

Now let's take a look at the implementations:

libc++ (current svn version) defines the relevant part of get() as

sentry __s(*this, true);
if (__s)
{
    __r = this->rdbuf()->sbumpc();
    if (traits_type::eq_int_type(__r, traits_type::eof()))
       this->setstate(ios_base::failbit | ios_base::eofbit);
    else
        __gc_ = 1;
}

libstdc++ (as shipped with gcc 4.6.2) defines the same part as

sentry __cerb(*this, true);
if (__cerb)
  {
    __try
      {
        __c = this->rdbuf()->sbumpc();
        // 27.6.1.1 paragraph 3
        if (!traits_type::eq_int_type(__c, __eof))
          _M_gcount = 1;
        else
          __err |= ios_base::eofbit;
      }
[...]
if (!_M_gcount)
  __err |= ios_base::failbit;

As you can see, both libraries call sbumpc() and set eofbit if and only if sbumpc() returned eof.

Your testcase produces the same output for me using recent versions of both libraries.

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This is wierd. I can't find any of the text your quoting in my versions of the standard (C++03 and N3291): both of my versions says that get "Behaves as an unformatted input function. After constructing a sentry object, extracts a character c, if one is available." Nothing about the number of calls to rdbuf()->sbump() or rdbuf()->sgetc(). Although I wouldn't normally expect it, there's nothing illegal about an implementation that makes an additional call to rdbuf()->sgetc(), and setting eofbit because of that. –  James Kanze Jan 26 '12 at 8:58
    
Several points on your list of actions: concerning point 2: istream::get() doesn't do this---it is part of the actions of the constructor of the sentry object. Concerning point 3 and 4: the standard is much less constraining. Extraction must be as if by calling rdbuf()->sbumpc() or rdbuf()->sgetc() (which is an error, since rdbuf()->sgetc() doesn't extract, and rdbuf()->snextc() and rdbuf->sgetn(), which do, aren't mentionned). This says nothing about when and if look-ahead occurs. –  James Kanze Jan 26 '12 at 9:07
    
@JamesKanze Regarding sentry, the actions of its constructor are part of what istream::get() does. Like anything in C++, it's as-if: the implementation may (and sometimes does) do some of what it is supposed to do directly in get(). Regarding an additional call to sgetc -- there is nothing illegal in calling it or any other functions, but it would be illegal to set eofbit because of what it returned because it would violate the as-if clause. –  Cubbi Jan 26 '12 at 11:34
    
Calling any of the functions in a streambuf is observable behavior (since they forward to user defined virtual functions which may, and typically do, make system calls). And all of the implementations do set eofbit any time they see an end of file. If get() usually doesn't set it in this particular case, it's because one can implement get() without any lookahead. Can, not must. But the standard is sigularly silent about lookahead. –  James Kanze Jan 26 '12 at 13:26
    
@JamesKanze get() is specified to extract one character. Extraction of one character is specified as an as-if call to sbumpc/sgetc. A call to sbumc/sgetc is specified to result in eofbit if eof is returned. I agree that the standard isn't saying whether it the call to sbumc/sgetc or any call to sbumc/sgetc, including the unnecessary calls added by the particularly curious input function. –  Cubbi Jan 26 '12 at 14:21
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The value of s.eof() is unspecified in the second call—it may be true or false, and it might not even be consistent. All you can say is that if s.eof() returns true, all future input will fail (but if it returns false, there's no guarantee that future input will succeed). After failure (s.fail()), if s.eof() returns true, it's likely (but not 100% certain) that the failure was due to end of file. It's worth considering the following scenario, however:

double test;
std::istringstream s1("");
s1 >> test;
std::cout << (s1.fail() ? "T" : "F") << (s1.eof() ? "T" : "F") << endl;
std::istringstream s2("1.e-");
s2 >> test;
std::cout << (s2.fail() ? "T" : "F") << (s2.eof() ? "T" : "F") << endl;

On my machine, both lines are "TT", despite the fact that the first failed because there was no data (end of file), the second because the floating point value was incorrectly formatted.

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How is it unspecified? The standard is clear: set failbit and eofbit if sbumpc()/sgetc() returns eof, set badbit if an exception is thrown. –  Cubbi Jan 25 '12 at 16:55
    
@Cubbi No. Set eofbit if sgetc returns eof, but not necessarily failbit; look ahead is always legal, and sometimes necessary. And when and how often exactly get calls sgetc isn't specified. –  James Kanze Jan 25 '12 at 17:20
    
I posted the response as an answer. –  Cubbi Jan 25 '12 at 18:09
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eofbit is set when there is an operation which tries to read past the end of file, the operation may not fail (if you are reading an integer and there is no end of line after the integer, I expect eofbit to be set but the read of the integer to succeed). I.E. I get and expect FT for

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int main() {
    std::stringstream s("12");
    int i;
    s >> i;

    std::cout << (s.fail() ? "T" : "F") << (s.eof() ? "T" : "F") << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Here I don't expect istream::get to try and read after the returned character (i.e. I don't expect it to hang until I enter the next line if I read a \n with it), so libstd++ seems indeed right, at least in a QOI POV.

The standard description for istream::get just says "extracts a character c, if one is available" without describing how and so doesn't seem to prevent libc++ behavior.

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