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I try to subscribe a event handler to the data received event. Seems like I cant specify the event handler function name. I dont understand why
myComPort.DataReceived += new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler(comPort_DataReceived); is giving me error message. Here is the problem, hope anyone can answer it.

a busy cat

a busy cat

namespace serialport
{
    public class Program
    {

        internal List<Byte> portBuffer = new List<Byte>(1024);

        static void Main()
        {


            //1. find available COM port
            string[] nameArray = null;
            string myComPortName = null;
            nameArray = SerialPort.GetPortNames();
            if (nameArray.GetUpperBound(0) >= 0)
            {
                myComPortName = nameArray[0];
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error");
                return;
            }


            //2. create a serialport object
            // the port object is closed automatically by use using()
            SerialPort myComPort = new SerialPort();
            myComPort.DataReceived += new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler(comPort_DataReceived);
            myComPort.PortName = myComPortName;
            //the default paramit are 9600,no parity,one stop bit, and no flow control



            //3.open the port
            try
            {
                myComPort.Open();
            }
            catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
            {
                MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
            }
            //Add timeout, p161

            //reading Bytes
            byte[] byteBuffer = new byte[10];
            Int32 count;
            Int32 numberOfReceivedBytes;
            myComPort.Read(byteBuffer, 0, 9);
            for (count = 0; count <= 3; count++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(byteBuffer[count].ToString());
            }


        }
        //The event handler should be static??
        void comPort_DataReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
        {
            int numberOfBytesToRead;
            numberOfBytesToRead = myComPort.BytesToRead;
            byte[] newReceivedData = new byte[numberOfBytesToRead];
            myComPort.Read(newReceivedData, 0, numberOfBytesToRead);
            portBuffer.AddRange(newReceivedData);
            ProcessData();
        }
        private void ProcessData()
        {
            //when 8 bytes have arrived, display then and remove them from the buffer
            int count;
            int numberOfBytesToRead = 8;

            if (portBuffer.Count >= numberOfBytesToRead)
            {
                for (count = 0; count < numberOfBytesToRead; count++)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine((char)(portBuffer[count]));
                }
                portBuffer.RemoveRange(0, numberOfBytesToRead);
            }
        }

    }

    }
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In your event handler, myComPort isn't in scope - it's declared locally in your main() method. I would suggest that you extract the com port handling into a class and make myComPort a member variable of that class.

Also, your comments note that the SerialPort class has a managed resource that it needs to dispose of using the IDisposable / Using pattern, but you don't have a using block wrapping the access to the comm port.

Last, the method you are adding as the event handler exists as an instance member rather than as a static member; to access it from the main() method's static scope, you need to either grab it from an instance of the class or make the method static.

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First, since method Main is static, you can only call other static methods in the same class. As it is, comPort_DataReceived is declared as an instance method, the following code should fix the assignment of the event handler:

static void comPort_DataReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
   // ...
}

Second, since myComPort is defined in Main, it will not be visible in comPort_DataReceived. You have two choices: either declare myComPort as a static member of your class, or use the sender argument of the event handler:

static void comPort_DataReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
    SerialPort port = (SerialPort)sender;
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
4  
+1 for casting the sender. Some refactoring might be better but the principle of casting the sender is massively useful to know for any event usage. –  Chris Jan 25 '12 at 15:56
    
pretty important refactoring is definitively necessary if you want a proper C# program that follows OOP principles. I also omitted the fact that other instance methods and variables will still be a problem, I tried to keep the answer pedagogical instead of just providing the code I'd have used myself, so a little further research is necessary ;) –  madd0 Jan 25 '12 at 16:04
    
So declare a method static makes it belong to a type rather to a instance, right? if so, should we always declare the event handler as static? I guess if i put mycomport as a member of the class, then it should visible to all the methods, right? –  fiftyplus Jan 25 '12 at 16:22
    
Your first phrase is correct. As for the rest, you will quickly write programs with more than one class. You will probably be creating instances of these classes, so you'll be needing more instance methods, properties and fields. Your example in this question is special because everything happens in the program's start up class and method, which happens to be static, but this rarely happens. –  madd0 Jan 25 '12 at 16:37
    
Hi madd0, after i made the mycomport a member of the class, the old problem is solved, however, mycomport become invisible to the Main, what happened here? –  fiftyplus Jan 25 '12 at 16:37

Tetsujin no Oni's answer is the ideal way to handle your issue with scope. Another approach that also works is to declare myComPort as a static member of your Program, e.g.:

internal List<Byte> portBuffer = new List<Byte>(1024);
private SerialPort myComPort = new SerialPort();

Then simply remove the myComPort declaration from your main method.

share|improve this answer
    
But oh the threading issues you could create getting into THAT habit. –  Tetsujin no Oni Jan 25 '12 at 18:14
    
@TetsujinnoOni Of course - I wasn't suggesting that OP make it a habit :) I've written enough socket-based apps to know how painful it is to have deadlocks on a single thread. –  Brian Driscoll Jan 25 '12 at 18:50
    
I wanted to be sure there was awareness of the issue, since the OP had mentioned being new to C#. –  Tetsujin no Oni Jan 25 '12 at 20:27

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