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It is possible to stop a running reader?

Scenario: I have a table with 100000 data sets

CREATE TABLE stock (
uid bigint NOT NULL,
name text,
quantity integer,
x bytea,
y bytea
);

and a console application (.NET 4.0, Npgsql 2.0.11.0/2.0.11.92) for reading data

conn = new NpgsqlConnection("Server=localhost;Database=postgres;User id=postgres;password=postgres;Timeout=600;CommandTimeout=600;ConnectionLifeTime=600;");
using (new ConnectionOpen(conn))
using (var ta = conn.BeginTransaction(IsolationLevel.Snapshot))
{
    IDbCommand command = conn.CreateCommand("SELECT * from stock;");
    command.SetTransaction(ta);
    IDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();

    int n = 0;
    while (!reader.IsClosed && reader.Read())
    {
        n++;

        if (n > 5000)
        {
            if (reader != null)
            {
                 ((NpgsqlDataReader)reader).Close();
            }
        }
     }
     ((NpgsqlDataReader)reader).Dispose();
     reader = null;
}

I have observed data reader can not really stopped. It seems data reader reads all rows first and returns normally afterwards.

This example is an abstract of a bigger application where user will stop data reader by pressing a button because reading takes too long.

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4 Answers 4

You could put a break in the while loop, but not sure if/how you would tie that to a user action to let them decide when to break out of the read loop. Alternately you could restructure the code so it returns the first x number of rows and then give them a continue button to return the rest or to return the next x number of rows.

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The data reader typically returns chunks of data from the database server (at least that's how it works with SQL Server). Postgre SQL might behave differently under the covers.

Another way to attack this is to do the loading of a data as a background task (BackgroundWorker, Task, etc). That way your UI thread stays responsive and it doesn't matter how the reader is implemented under the covers.

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I don't think a BackgroundWorker is going to work in a console application. –  LarsTech Jan 25 '12 at 16:30
    
I have done it. But sometimes user want to start a new query with different data during reading and displaying first data rows. And now I have to stop data reader and to start a new command resp. data reader. –  Joerg Jan 25 '12 at 16:41

This is a guess.

Possible solution 1

...
using (var ta = conn.BeginTransaction(IsolationLevel.Snapshot))
{
    IDbCommand command = conn.CreateCommand("SELECT * from stock;");
    command.SetTransaction(ta);
    IDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();

    int n = 5000;

    //put it in using
    using(IDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
    {
        //read first N rows
        for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
        {           
            //get value from the columns of the current row
            for (i = 0; i < reader.FieldCount; i++)
            {
                Console.Write("{0} \t", reader[i]);
            }
        }
    }    
}

Possible sollution 2

Use TOP sql command, see samples

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I have leave out log outputs in my scenario. Log outputs for checking behaviour of data reader in my scenario show always a waiting time after command "((NpgsqlDataReader)reader).Close()" of some seconds. This waiting time is about the same if I would read out all rows. –  Joerg Jan 25 '12 at 16:35
    
!true && false evaluates to false. !true XOR false would evaluate to true. –  Vincent McNabb Apr 18 '13 at 1:43
    
that's right, will update this. –  oleksii Apr 18 '13 at 9:41

I know this thread is rather old, but I believe the correct answer to this person's question is as follows:

command.Cancel(); //execute before closing the reader
reader.Close();

By calling DbCommand.Cancel(), you're indicating that no further records should be processed and that the command (including the underlying query) should halt immediately and get out quick. If you don't cancel the command, when you try to close the DbDataReader (or break out of a loop/using block), and you're dealing with a large number of records being returned, the Close() method fills in the values for output parameters, return value, and RecordsAffected.

If you try to close the reader before it’s read all of the records, Close tries to read all the data and fill out those values, and it will just seem to hang (most likely resulting in some sort of timeout exception being thrown). If you don’t care about the remaining values in the result set — and you most likely don’t if you’re breaking out of the read loop — you should cancel the underlying command before calling Close().

Parts of the above information was retrieved from: https://www.informit.com/guides/content.aspx?g=dotnet&seqNum=610

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