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Say that I have two roles: Simple::Tax and Real::Tax. In testing situations, I want to use Simple::Tax, and in production, I want to use Real::Tax. What is the best way to do this? My first thought was to use different versions of the new method to create objects with different roles:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;

{
    package Simple::Tax;
    use Moose::Role;

    requires 'price';

    sub calculate_tax {
        my $self = shift;
        return int($self->price * 0.05);
    }
}


{
    package A;
    use Moose;
    use Moose::Util qw( apply_all_roles );

    has price => ( is => "rw", isa => 'Int' ); #price in pennies

    sub new_with_simple_tax {
        my $class = shift;
        my $obj = $class->new(@_);
        apply_all_roles( $obj, "Simple::Tax" );
    }
}

my $o = A->new_with_simple_tax(price => 100);
print $o->calculate_tax, " cents\n";

My second thought was to use an if statement in the body of package to use different with statements:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;

{
    package Complex::Tax;
    use Moose::Role;

    requires 'price';

    sub calculate_tax {
        my $self = shift;
        #pretend this is more complex
        return int($self->price * 0.15);
    }
}

{
    package Simple::Tax;
    use Moose::Role;

    requires 'price';

    sub calculate_tax {
        my $self = shift;
        return int($self->price * 0.05);
    }
}


{
    package A;
    use Moose;

    has price => ( is => "rw", isa => 'Int' ); #price in pennies

    if ($ENV{TEST_A}) {
        with "Simple::Tax";
    } else {
        with "Complex::Tax";
    }
}

my $o = A->new(price => 100);
print $o->calculate_tax, " cents\n";

Is one of these better than the other, is there something horrible about either of them, and is there a better way I haven't thought of yet.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

My first suggestion would be something like MooseX::Traits and then specify the different roles at object creation:

my $test = A->with_traits('Simple::Tax')->new(...);

my $prod = A->with_traits('Complex::Tax')->new(...);

But this opens the door to an A being created without either Role being applied. So thinking about it further, I think you've got an X/Y problem. If Simple::Tax is only ever used to mock up Complex::Tax in a test environment you can do several things to override the Complex::Tax implementation.

For example you could just define Simple::Tax like so:

package Simple::Tax; 
use Moose::Role;

requires 'calculate_tax';
around calculate_tax => sub { int($_[1]->price * 0.05) };

Then always have A compose Complex::Tax and apply Simple::Tax to it only during tests (using apply_all_roles).

If however you need Simple::Tax and Complex::Tax both in production (and not simply for testing) your best bet is refactor from a composition relationship (does) to a delegation relationship (has).

 package TaxCalculator::API;
 use Moose::Role;

 requires qw(calculate_tax);

 package SimpleTax::Calculator;
 use Moose;
 with qw(TaxCalculator::API);

 sub calculate_tax { ... }

 package ComplexTax::Calculator;
 use Moose;
 with qw(TaxCalculator::API);

 sub calcuate_tax { ... }


 package A;
 use Moose;

 has tax_calculator => ( 
      does => 'TaxCalculator::API', 
      handles => 'TaxCalculator::API', 
      default => sub { ComplexTax::Calculator->new() },
 );

Then if you want to override it you simply pass in a new tax_calculator:

my $test = A->new(tax_calculator => SimpleTax::Calculator->new());

my $prod = A->new(tax_calculator => ComplexTax::Calculator->new());

Because handles will delegate all of the methods from the role as new proxies this is practically identical to having composed the role yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
So, the around calculate_tax method in the simple tax role never actually calls the calculate_tax method on the object, right? I think that is the cleanest way. –  Chas. Owens Jan 27 '12 at 14:08
    
Exactly, you totally override the parent method using around to replace it. –  perigrin Jan 27 '12 at 23:55

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