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Please explain this to me. I'm trying to create an array of arrays with a for loop. When it didn't work, I tried simplifying the code to understand what Javascript is doing, but the simple code doesn't make sense either.

function test(){
    var sub_array = [];
    var super_array =[];
    for (var i=1;i<=3;i++){
        sub_array.push(i);
        super_array.push(sub_array);
    }
    alert(super_array);
}

I expect to see [1; 1,2; 1,2,3]. Instead I get [1,2,3; 1,2,3; 1,2,3]. I get the same phenomenon if I loop 0-2 and assign by index.

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6 Answers

You're always pushing a reference to the same array into your super-array.

To solve that problem, you can use slice() to clone the sub-array before pushing it:

function test() {
    var sub_array = [];
    var super_array = [];
    for (var i = 1; i <= 3; i++) {
        sub_array.push(i);
        super_array.push(sub_array.slice(0));
    }
    alert(super_array);
}

EDIT: As Dan D. rightfully points out below, you can also call concat() without arguments instead of slice(0). It's faster according to this article (I did not measure it myself):

for (var i = 1; i <= 3; i++) {
    sub_array.push(i);
    super_array.push(sub_array.concat());
}
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2  
why did you chose to use .slice(0) to copy the Array rather than .concat()? which may be faster but the profiling i did i wasn't sure of. –  Dan D. Jan 25 '12 at 16:07
    
Interesting, according to this blog concat() is faster. I'll mention it in my answer. Thank you for your comment :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Jan 25 '12 at 16:12
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When you push "sub_array", you're not pushing a copy of it. You end up with the same array three times in "super_array". (I should say that you're pushing a reference to the same array three times.)

You could do this:

    // ...
    super_array.push(sub_array.slice(0));

to make a copy.

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Note that you are pushing the same array into super_array for each iteration in the for-loop. Try instead the following:

function test(){
    var sub_array = [];
    var super_array =[];
    for (var i=1;i<=3;i++){
        sub_array = sub_array.slice(0,sub_array.length);
        sub_array.push(i);
        super_array.push(sub_array);
    }
    alert(super_array);
}
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+1 for using slice, although you don't need to pass in any parameters when you're using it to clone the entire array arr.slice() === arr.slice(0,arr.length) –  wheresrhys Jan 25 '12 at 16:26
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well. You have to understand, that Array, Objects, Functions, etc. are references in javascript (only Numbers(Int,Floats,etc) and Strings are passed "by-value", which means, that the value is copied/duplicated)! if you have an var a=[];, und say var b=a and add b.push("bla"), then alerting a, will show you the "bla" entry, even though you added it to b. In other words; a and b is to javascript like a note on the frige from mom saying "the sandwhich on the left is for you." And then you know, that to take the left one and not just any random sandwich from the fridge. She also could have written another note (variable b) on your house' door, so that you knew where to go and look for the sandwich if you are in a hurry. If she would have stuck a sandwich to the door.. well, that would be ackward. And JS thinks the same about it :)

so the solution to your problem is as fallows;

function test(){
    var super_array =[];
    for (var i=1;i<=3;i++){
        var subarray=[];
        for (var u=1;u<=4-i;u++){
            sub_array.push(u);
            super_array.push(subarray);
        }
    }
    alert(super_array);
}

by redefining the subarray, you create a new reference. So that the variable b (the second note on the hous' door) now points in the direction of a different sandwich - maybe dad's sandwich.

I hope I could help you understand this.

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It is same sub_array that you are adding to the super_array. So why it has to be different.

You are not creating a new array and pushing into a super_array.

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sub_array is stored as a reference in super_array this means that when you change sub_array the change is reflected inside super_array

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