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I have what appears to be a hash of a hash of an array of hashes. I'm trying to pull some values out and I'm stumped (this is way deeper than I would go with a structure. It looks like this.....

%htest = (
  8569 => {
    4587 => [
           {
            date=> "2011-01-15",
            approved=> 1,
           },
           { 
            date=> "2011-01-12",
            approved=> 1,
           },
           ],
    1254 => [
           {
            date=> "2011-01-12",
            approved=> "",
           },
           { 
            date=> "",
            approved=> 1,
           },
           ],
        },
);

Trying to iterate over this thing is giving me a massive headache. I'm trying to access the number of elements under the second hash value (4587 and 1254). The number of those elements where approved="1" and the number of elements where the date contains a value.

If I could iterate over them I sure I could shove what I need into a less complex structure but so far I'm at a loss.

I got this far...

while (my ($id, $surveyhash) = each %{ $htest{'8569'} } ){
    print "$enumid = $subhash\n";
    print Dumper $subhash."\n";
}

That gives me the "4587" and "1254" but trying to do a dumper on $subhash just gives me....

4587 = ARRAY(0x9a9ffb0)
$VAR1 = 'ARRAY(0x9a9ffb0)
';
1254 = ARRAY(0x9a91788)
$VAR1 = 'ARRAY(0x9a91788)
';

Any idea how to iterate over this monstrosity? Janie

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your structure has typos, you need commas between the innermost hashes and a parenthesis at the end (rather than a curly bracket)

Once you fix it you can use something like this:

my $approved = 0, my $date_has_value = 0;
while ( my ($k,$vref) = each %htest ) {
    while ( my ($k,$v) = each %$vref ) { 
        # Now you're inside the inner hash, so there will be 2 iterations
        # with $k 4587 and 1254
        foreach my $item (@$v) {
            # Now each $item is a reference to the innermost hashes
            $approved++ if $item->{approved} == 1;
            $date_has_value++ if $item->{date};
        }
    }
}
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OMG xpapad, what a fast answer! I was correcting those things when you replied. –  Jane WIlkie Jan 25 '12 at 16:16
1  
@JaneWilkie you might want to use eq instead of == in $approved++ if $item->{approved} == 1; to avoid Argument "" isn't numeric... warning. Looks like you have non numeric value in approved. Other than that, the code above is great. –  jchips12 Jan 25 '12 at 16:24
    
This works like a CHAMP! Vote xpapad UP! WAY UP! –  Jane WIlkie Jan 25 '12 at 16:41

Here's a fairly explicit iteration that should help get you started

my ($num_approved, $num_date) = (0, 0);

# outer hash
while (my ($ka, $va) = each %htest)
{
  # inner hash
  while (my ($kb, $vb) = each %{$va})
  {
    # each hash inside the array
    foreach my $h (@{$vb})
    {
      $num_approved += ${$h}{"approved"} == 1;
      $num_date     += length(${$h}{"date"}) > 0;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Voting up for tutorial points. I swear 2012 is the year I get better at this. JW –  Jane WIlkie Jan 25 '12 at 16:53

Counting match cases can be done with "scalar grep".

my ($approved, $date_has_value) = (0, 0);

for my $v1 (values %htest) {
    for my $v2 (values %$v1) {
        $approved       += scalar grep { $$_{approved} eq '1' } @$v2;
        $date_has_value += scalar grep { $$_{date}     ne ''  } @$v2;
    }
}
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1  
I would like to note that scalar isn't needed here. += gives scalar context by itself. ( I would leave it in though to give new Perl programmers an indication of whats happening. ) –  Brad Gilbert Jan 26 '12 at 14:22
1  
Yes not everyone agrees on that one. Some people say leave the 'scalar' in because it makes it clearer what's going on and less brittle against the expression being moved to a list context, and in any case it compiles away to nothing; other people say if it doesn't do anything then take it out. –  hochgurgler Jan 26 '12 at 15:09

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