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I am looking for a general string encryption class in .NET. (Not to be confused with the 'SecureString' class.)

I have started to come up with my own class, but thought there must be a .NET class that already allows you to encrypt/decrypt strings of any encoding with any Cryptographic Service Provider.

Public Class SecureString

        Private key() As Byte
        Private iv() As Byte
        Private m_SecureString As String

        Public ReadOnly Property Encrypted() As String
            Get
                Return m_SecureString
            End Get
        End Property

        Public ReadOnly Property Decrypted() As String
            Get
                Return Decrypt(m_SecureString)
            End Get
        End Property

        Public Sub New(ByVal StringToSecure As String)
            If StringToSecure Is Nothing Then StringToSecure = ""
            m_SecureString = Encrypt(StringToSecure)
        End Sub

        Private Function Encrypt(ByVal StringToEncrypt As String) As String

            Dim result As String = ""
            Dim bytes() As Byte = Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(StringToEncrypt)

            Using provider As New AesCryptoServiceProvider()

                With provider
                    .Mode = CipherMode.CBC                  
                    .GenerateKey()
                    .GenerateIV()
                    key = .Key
                    iv = .IV
                End With

                Using ms As New IO.MemoryStream
                    Using cs As New CryptoStream(ms, provider.CreateEncryptor(), CryptoStreamMode.Write)
                        cs.Write(bytes, 0, bytes.Length)
                        cs.FlushFinalBlock()
                    End Using
                    result = Convert.ToBase64String(ms.ToArray())
                End Using

            End Using

            Return result

        End Function

        Private Function Decrypt(ByVal StringToDecrypt As String) As String

            Dim result As String = ""
            Dim bytes() As Byte = Convert.FromBase64String(StringToDecrypt)

            Using provider As New AesCryptoServiceProvider()

                Using ms As New IO.MemoryStream
                    Using cs As New CryptoStream(ms, provider.CreateDecryptor(key, iv), CryptoStreamMode.Write)
                        cs.Write(bytes, 0, bytes.Length)
                        cs.FlushFinalBlock()
                    End Using
                    result = Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(ms.ToArray())
                End Using

            End Using

            Return result

        End Function

    End Class
share|improve this question
    
Uhm, you need to pass IV for decryption. –  Migol May 23 '09 at 1:20
    
@Migol - Could you further clarify your comment? –  user111370 May 23 '09 at 1:23
    
IV can be sent via opentext and contains some data other than key to decrypt your string. –  Migol May 23 '09 at 10:19

4 Answers 4

The AES algorithm for symmetric encryption is generally the way to go for generic encryption of strings. However, I'm afraid that the .NET BCL doesn't simplify things any further for you the providing the basic encryption/decryption classes and functions.

You can find a good example of how to use the crypographic classes specifically for string encryption on this page. It appears to be very complete and well commented indeed - you may even find that you can use it without any further modifications. Note: Rijndael is the same algorithm as AES. (Technically, the former refers to the algorithm's real name, and the latter the Advanced Encryption Standard.)

share|improve this answer
    
@Noldorin - Thanks for the link! Is there any generic function that I can pass a string of any encoding and use any of the Cryptographic Service Providers? –  user111370 May 23 '09 at 1:42
    
@cryptospin: No problem. Just realised I slightly misunderstood your original question. I've just updated the post with a bit more info, anyway. There's definitely no helper class/methods in the .NET framework to do this for you I'm afraid, though the code on the linked page should provide you with a good starting point. A nice way to go about it might be to use extension methods here. –  Noldorin May 23 '09 at 1:44

If you are trying to achieve the same goal as .NET's SecureString, then your example really doesn't solve the problem. (I could be misunderstanding your goals, in which case I apologize.)

The idea of .NET's SecureString is that it stores the string data encrypted in a non-managed chunk of memory, is immutable once created, and can not be read in .NET using a normal string variable. This protects the string from anyone trying to probe your memory space (i.e. malware, worm, Trojan, whatever), and must be explicitly cleaned up by you. The reasons for this involve how .NET treats strings, and the fact that data in memory is only cleaned up at the whim of the GC.

Even though your SecureString class encrypts the string into a private variable, the original string that was passed in is still insecure. It can also stick around for a while before the GC collects it, or, if that string was interned, it will live for the duration of the process it resides within. Interned strings are stored in a table, which makes them easier to find, too.

On the other side of things...if you Decrypt your SecureString, your getting a new string variable that could run into the same problems as the input string...it is only cleaned up when the GC decides to...and it also may end up interned and live for the duration of the process.

To compound problems, every time you Decrypt, you are getting another copy of your encrypted string. This could build up a surplus of decrypted versions of your secure string, increasing the chances that some piece of malware that is probing for, say, credit card numbers...will actually find one.

I have tried many times to create a better, more .NET like version of .NET 2.0's SecureString, but have never been able to produce something that is truly secure. You could get a pointer to the string variable that was decrypted, wipe it, set each character to nil, etc. However this could be very problematic in the even that something is still referencing that string, causing disappearing text, corrupted reads, etc. If the string is interned, which generally means it is being used by many things for a long duration of time, wiping it wipes the only version, and affects all use of it. Even if you managed to successfully wipe a copy of your secure string, there is no guarantee that it wasn't copied by other code before you wiped it (i.e. you send your string off to some web service...it now lives in more than one process space, quite possibly in different physical locations around the world.)

Its definitely a complicated issue, and only really provides security in the event that your application's memory space has been compromised by malware of some sort.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to post. If you read the OP I do explicitly state "(Not to be confused with the 'SecureString' class.)" –  user111370 May 23 '09 at 19:05
    
"This protects the string from anyone trying to probe your memory space" it doesn't and doesn't aim to. If you can read the memory of a process you can almost certainly inject native code as well, at which point extracting the plaintext behind SecureStrings is trivial. It only keeps the the string out of crash dumps, the swap file, etc. –  CodesInChaos Mar 18 at 9:59
    
@CodesInChaos: The text is not plain, it is encrypted. If a SecureString simply stored plain text on a non-managed heap, I would agree, it would probably only keep it out of crash dumps, swap file, etc. Given that the string is encrypted, it protects anyone who might be probing your memory from immediately getting it's value. Sure, brute force or possibly known attacks (if there are any for your security protocol) could still potentially break the encryption, but that is technically the case with every security mechanism. So I stand by my statement. –  jrista Mar 18 at 20:41
    
@jrista In practice any process with rights to read a process's memory can call CreateRemoteThread instead with code that calls DPAPI to decrypt the string. So SecureString can't protect against trojans, only against accidental leaks. –  CodesInChaos Mar 18 at 20:56
    
That assumes a process has actual rights. I'll agree with you there, if a process has rights. There are other means of reading memory, such as directly (not that you would necessarily know anything about the data structure). If a process actually has any rights to violate your memory space, then you do indeed have a problem...but access to SecureString data is probably the least of them. ;) –  jrista Mar 18 at 23:29

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