Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 2D array t in numpy:

>>> t = numpy.array(range(81)).reshape((9,9))
>>> t
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8],
       [ 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17],
       [18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26],
       [27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35],
       [36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44],
       [45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53],
       [54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62],
       [63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71],
       [72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80]])

It is indexed by two numbers: row and column index.

>>> t[2,3]
21
>>> t.shape
(9, 9)
>>> t.strides
(72, 8)

What I want to do is to divide the array into rectangular cells of fixed size, 3×3 for example. I'd like to avoid memory copying. The way I try to achieve this is creating a view onto t with correspondent shape and strides ((3,3,3,3) and (216,24,72,8) respectively). This way the first two indexes of the view would mean the position of 3×3 cell in the larger grid and the last two would mean the position of element inside the cell. For example, t[0,1,:,:] would return

array([[ 3,  4,  5],
       [12, 13, 14],
       [21, 22, 23]])

So my question is — how to create the described view? Am I missing a simpler method? Can this be done elegantly with slicing syntax?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Edit: A way that does not require you to figure out the strides yourself is

numpy.rollaxis(t.reshape(3, 3, 3, 3), 2, 1)

[end of edit]

Another way to achieve this is to use numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided:

>>> t = numpy.arange(81.).reshape((9,9))
>>> numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(t, shape=(3,3,3,3), strides=(216,24,72,8))
array([[[[  0.,   1.,   2.],
         [  9.,  10.,  11.],
         [ 18.,  19.,  20.]],

        [[  3.,   4.,   5.],
         [ 12.,  13.,  14.],
         [ 21.,  22.,  23.]],

        [[  6.,   7.,   8.],
         [ 15.,  16.,  17.],
         [ 24.,  25.,  26.]]],


       [[[ 27.,  28.,  29.],
         [ 36.,  37.,  38.],
         [ 45.,  46.,  47.]],

        [[ 30.,  31.,  32.],
         [ 39.,  40.,  41.],
         [ 48.,  49.,  50.]],

        [[ 33.,  34.,  35.],
         [ 42.,  43.,  44.],
         [ 51.,  52.,  53.]]],


       [[[ 54.,  55.,  56.],
         [ 63.,  64.,  65.],
         [ 72.,  73.,  74.]],

        [[ 57.,  58.,  59.],
         [ 66.,  67.,  68.],
         [ 75.,  76.,  77.]],

        [[ 60.,  61.,  62.],
         [ 69.,  70.,  71.],
         [ 78.,  79.,  80.]]]])

Note that the strides you provided are correct only for float arrays (itemsize == 8), while the example t in your post is an int array (which might or might no have itemsize == 8).

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding the itemsize: yeah, you are absolutely correct. I think I will calculate the needed strides based on the ones which passed array already has. This way the view-creating routine will also work on other 2D views too. –  ulidtko Jan 25 '12 at 16:39
1  
Please move the rollaxis solution on top of the answer. –  ulidtko Jan 25 '12 at 16:48

You can do:

t = np.arange(81).reshape(9,9)
t.shape = (3, 3, 3, 3)
t = t.transpose((0, 2, 1, 3))

>>> print t.strides
(108, 12, 36, 4)

>>> print t
[[[[ 0  1  2]
   [ 9 10 11]
   [18 19 20]]

  [[ 3  4  5]
   [12 13 14]
   [21 22 23]]

  [[ 6  7  8]
   [15 16 17]
   [24 25 26]]]


 [[[27 28 29]
   [36 37 38]
   [45 46 47]]

  [[30 31 32]
   [39 40 41]
   [48 49 50]]

  [[33 34 35]
   [42 43 44]
   [51 52 53]]]


 [[[54 55 56]
   [63 64 65]
   [72 73 74]]

  [[57 58 59]
   [66 67 68]
   [75 76 77]]

  [[60 61 62]
   [69 70 71]
   [78 79 80]]]]

transpose will return a view whenever possible, that way you don't have to worry about knowing the data type.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.