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I have a Perl script which calls a store procedure in MySQL. The stored procedure is very simple, it checks to see if a record exists, and updates it if it does. If the record does not exist it will create it. The basic code looks like this:

DELIMITER $$

CREATE DEFINER=`me`@`%` PROCEDURE `updateClientUsage`(IN inDate DATE, IN inPort SMALLINT(4), IN inOwner VARCHAR(255), IN inName VARCHAR(255), IN inEmailed TINYINT(1))
BEGIN
    IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM client_usage WHERE port = inPort AND name = inName) THEN
        UPDATE client_usage SET date = inDate, emailed = '0' WHERE port = inPort AND name = inName;
    ELSE
        INSERT INTO client_usage (date, port, owner, name, emailed) 
        VALUES (inDate, inPort, inOwner, inName, inEmailed);
    END IF;
END

When I run my script it works fine until this procedure tries to update a record that starts with an underscore (the name field starts with an underscore). I get an error that there is a duplicate entry. Does anyone know why that is the case?

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Can you post the exact error message? Also, are you sure it's trying to UPDATE and not INSERT if you're getting a duplicate error? Are there any constraints on the table? If so, what are they? –  Dan Jan 25 '12 at 16:35
    
I think it is trying to insert when it should be updating. The error message is: DBD::mysql::st execute failed: Duplicate entry '_ClientThatStartsWithUnderscore' –  cottageDog Jan 25 '12 at 16:56
    
This is probably another problem, however you assign a string '0' to emailed, but the parameter inEmailed is declared as TINYINT(1). –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 25 '12 at 16:58
    
Hmm, I changed the data type for emailed and a few other fields to match what they are in table and that seems to have fixed it. –  cottageDog Jan 25 '12 at 17:06

2 Answers 2

This will only work if there is a unique index or a primary key on port and name. If the primary key or a unique index are defined on other columns, you may get duplicate keys even after your check WHERE port = inPort AND name = inName.

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Part and Name are my 2 primary keys. I was able to fix it by changing the datatypes for inDate, inName, etc... to match the datatypes in the table. –  cottageDog Jan 25 '12 at 17:12

No need for the condition, since it can be specified in the where-clause (the test is the same)

   UPDATE client_usage 
      SET date = inDate, emailed = '0'
    WHERE port = inPort AND name = inName
       ;

   INSERT INTO client_usage (date, port, owner, name, emailed) 
   VALUES (inDate, inPort, inOwner, inName, inEmailed)
   WHERE NOT EXISTS(SELECT *
        FROM client_usage 
       WHERE port = inPort AND name = inName
       )
       ;

Also does 'name' happen to be a reserved word in mysql ? Avoid it.

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Syntax error. MySQL does not support INSERT ... VALUES ... WHERE. Additionally, the OP's problem is that a compound uniqueness constraint is needed on (port, name). –  pilcrow Jan 26 '12 at 6:19

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