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Is it possible to call recursively a method from an object literal?

For example:

(function () {
    'use strict';
    var abc = ['A', 'B', 'C'],
        obj = {
            f: function () {
                if (abc.length) {
                    abc.shift();
                    f(); // Recursive call
                }
            }
        };

    obj.f();
}());

Error: 'f' was used before it was defined.

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

f is a method on your object. As a result, when you're in f, this will be the object to which f is attached. So to recursively call f, use this.f()

f: function () {
    if (abc.length) {
        abc.shift();
        this.f(); // Recursive call
    }
}

Just note that inside of f, this will only be the current object if f is invoked as a method: obj.f();

If you do somethinig like: obj.f.call(lala);, then this will now be lala. And if you do something like:

var func = obj.f;
func();

Now this is the global object inside of f (or undefined in strict mode)

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this may or may not point to obj depending on how f is called. Better make this clear before it bites the guy later. –  Matti Virkkunen Jan 25 '12 at 17:14
    
@MattiVirkkunen - indeed - edited. Thanks for the tip, and enjoy your new badges :) –  Adam Rackis Jan 25 '12 at 17:22
    
Yay! –  Matti Virkkunen Jan 25 '12 at 17:31

There's no variable called f defined anywhere in your code. Use obj.f() (or this.f if you know this points to where it should).

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You can, by using a named function expression:

        f: function myself() {
            if (abc.length) {
                abc.shift();
                myself(); // Recursive call
            }
        }

A must-read: http://kangax.github.com/nfe/

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