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I am sure there is a "good" way of solving this, but it's something that has always bugged me. I have a method that is supposed to return an object, but has certain preconditions for its parameters. These are outside my control and can fail for "business logic" reasons (if you'll forgive the stale term).

The return value of the object would be null but I'd also like to pass back why, so the calling code can essentially say "I didn't get my object back because there wasn't enough information to build it".

I don't feel like try catch is the right approach, but have been using it in this situation for want of a better approach. All my reading here on stackoverflow and textbooks and MSDN seem to focus either on when or how to use exceptions, but I am somehow failing to come up with an approach for this case.

Can anyone suggest a pattern that would be more appropriate? (first post so... pls forgive any faux pas)

Here's a sample I have been playing with by way of example: (note the throw new Exception line below the // TODO comment)

public static Packet Parse(string packetString)
{
    Packet returnPacket = new Packet();
    StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();

    try
    {
        using (XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(packetString)))
        {
            XmlWriterSettings ws = new XmlWriterSettings();
            ws.Indent = true;
            using (XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter.Create(output, ws))
            {
                string rootNodeString = string.Empty;

                // Parse the packet string and capture each of the nodes.
                while (reader.Read())
                {
                    //test root node is the correct opening node name
                    if (rootNodeString == string.Empty)
                    {
                        if (reader.NodeType != XmlNodeType.Element || reader.Name != PACKETROOT)
                        {
                            // TODO: I don't really think this should be an exception, but going with it for now for expediency, since XmlReader is doing the same anyway
                            throw new Exception(string.Format("The root node of a Packet must be <{0}>", PACKETROOT));
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            rootNodeString = reader.Name;
                        }
                    }

                    switch (reader.NodeType)
                    {
                        case XmlNodeType.Element:
                            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("start element = {0}", reader.Name));
                            break;
                        case XmlNodeType.Text:
                            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("text = {0}", reader.Value));
                            break;
                        case XmlNodeType.XmlDeclaration:
                        case XmlNodeType.ProcessingInstruction:
                            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("XmlDeclaration/ProcessingInstruction = {0},{1}", reader.Name, reader.Value));
                            break;
                        case XmlNodeType.Comment:
                            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("comment = {0}", reader.Value));
                            break;
                        case XmlNodeType.EndElement:
                            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("end element = {0}", reader.Name));
                            break;
                    }
                }

            }
        }

    }
    catch (XmlException xem)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(xem.Message);
        throw;
    }

    return returnPacket;
}
share|improve this question
    
That's a lot of tabs... –  Austin Salonen Jan 25 '12 at 17:04
    
I prefer this over source that isn't indented at all. –  Mr Lister Jan 25 '12 at 17:13
    
for future reference: is this code section too indented? I forgot to even consider it. I guess it should be 1 or 2 spaces per tab instead of 4, but too many tabs?? –  reuben Jan 25 '12 at 17:25
    
I fall into the group that believes when you have this much indentation, you should break out more methods. –  Austin Salonen Jan 25 '12 at 20:11
    
@AustinSalonen You're talking about C#? I am not sure I agree with that. –  reuben Jan 26 '12 at 15:33

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If whatever you're testing for "is not supposed to happen", using an exception is exactly what you should do. It is an exceptional situation after all. Why do you think you shouldn't use one?

share|improve this answer
    
the failed precondition I am taking about isn't "supposed to happen" but it will happen pretty frequently: at a "human error" level of frequency rather than a "machine error" level (if that makes sense). –  reuben Jan 25 '12 at 17:05
    
@reuben: Human errors should be exceptional enough for exceptions to not cause any problems. –  Matti Virkkunen Jan 25 '12 at 17:07
    
@reuben: An exception is still the way to go. The calling code which supplies the pre-conditions can have exception-catching logic to handle displaying an error or carrying on in some other way. But the method itself shouldn't be concerned with any of that. It just checks its pre-conditions and gives up otherwise. –  David Jan 25 '12 at 17:08
1  
@reuben, there's no such thing as a failed precondition that "isn't supposed to happen". Or better stated, all conditions of a method are supposed to be met. Anything outside of this, unless there's a built-in fail-safe defaulting mechanism, is exceptional. –  Chris Haas Jan 25 '12 at 17:12
1  
@MattiVirkkunen: Out of interest, do you believe that int.TryParse (and friends) shouldn't exist? –  Jon Skeet Jan 25 '12 at 17:34

I have a method that is supposed to return an object, but has certain preconditions for its parameters. These are outside my control and can fail for "business logic" reasons

If the precondition is truly a precondition then a caller who fails to honour the precondition has a bug. The right thing to do is for the callee to throw an exception, ideally one that aggressively crashes the entire process. That will strongly encourage the caller to fix their bug.

But based on your description, it sounds like what you have is not actually a precondition; preconditions are the things that must be true and if they are not always true then the caller is buggy. It sounds like instead that what you have is a method that is doing too much; it is both validating that the arguments supplied are classified as valid by certain business policies, and computing a result if the arguments are valid.

I would therefore be inclined to split this up into two methods.

The first method analyzes its arguments to see if the business policy classifies them as valid, and returns a reporting object that describes in detail why the arguments are valid or invalid.

The second method computes a result. The second method can have as its precondition that the first method would have validated the arguments.

The return value of the object would be null but I'd also like to pass back why, so the calling code can essentially say "I didn't get my object back because there wasn't enough information to build it".

Again, this is more evidence that you are trying to do too much. You want the returned value of the method to be both an analysis describing why a business rule was not met, and the result of a business process. Those are two very different things, and therefore should be computed by two different methods.

share|improve this answer
1  
While I think that is valid critique, I don't this it answers his question. Regardless of how you want to dissect the responsibilities, you would still end up with a call that coordinates the validation and the conversion both handled by two other classes/calls. You didn't answer his question exactly as how to handle the communication in your scenario. I certainly wouldn't advocate that everywhere you want to consume the validation/conversion that you would make 2 calls. It increases the likelihood of misuse and I would venture exposes more implementation details than needed. –  Xenophile Jan 25 '12 at 21:02
    
I am inclined to agree with @Xenophile. I do admire the purity of the goal that Eric is espousing here and it should be kept in mind, but in reality I am dealing with APIs on both sides here - taking state from one 3rd party and passing it to another. There is just an element of "good enough" that I am going to have to accept here. Thanks for the considered answer though. I certainly don't disagree. –  reuben Jan 26 '12 at 15:22

The approach I use in Noda Time is to have a ParseResult<T> type, which is the result of a parse operation. It knows whether or not it succeeded, and if you ask a parse failure for the result it will throw an exception, but it doesn't throw an exception otherwise. (You can't currently get the exception which would be thrown without it being thrown, but I may add that later.)

This is nicer than throwing an exception because failure is expected here - it's not really exceptional.

It's nicer than using the pattern of int.TryParse etc because it gives you a single result value encapsulating everything about the parse operation - no more messing with out parameters, and much more detail available in the case of failure.

Now it's not clear to me whether this is appropriate in your particular case - but it is appropriate (IMO) when you're basically dealing with data which may well be invalid in a way which doesn't indicate anything being wrong with any part of your system: there's nothing surprising or exceptional going on here, just someone providing you with bad input :(

share|improve this answer
    
I totally agree.. this approach is much cleaner than an exception and allows you to include success/fail and even a debug string if you want. –  Xenophile Jan 25 '12 at 17:18

Exceptions are appropriate for this. It's not clear why you think otherwise...

share|improve this answer
    
Ok. Like I said in my question, it is more of a feeling of doing something wrong, rather than a clear cut scenario of bad style. If you're interested here's an article I read that helped created that feeling: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/pl/Vsexpressvcs/thread/… I most certainly wouldn't want this code to "beep 3 times, and sleep for 2 seconds", although, I tend to feel that this is a pretty extreme case of exception aversion. –  reuben Jan 25 '12 at 17:09

I agree with Jon Skeet. Unless it is truly exceptional situation, you don't want to overhead of an exception. User input validation is the last place I would recommend using exceptions.

Primarily I think it makes the logic harder to follow because you either have to wrap all the calls in try/catch blocks to retain the level of granularity you need or you defer your error logic farther down your code. Using a return class/structure ensures that your checks for correctness are explicit.

This can greatly improve the readability of your code. See the example below.

    public class ActionResult<T>
    {
        public T Result { get; set; }
        public bool IsSuccessful { get; set; }
        public string DetailMessage { get; set; }

        //Any other properties you might find useful like statuscode, etc.
    }

    public ActionResult<Packet> ParsePacket(string input)
    {
        Packet result = null;
        bool parseSuccess = true;
        string message = null;

        // Do your work, create packet and check conditions. 
        // Assign to your local variables.

        return new ActionResult<Packet> { 
            Result = result, 
            IsSuccessful = parseSuccess, 
            DetailMessage = message 
        };
    }

    public void SomeCallingMethodLikeGetPacket(string userInput)
    {
        ActionResult<Packet> parseResult = ParsePacket(userInput);
        if (!parseResult.IsSuccessful)
        {
            //Error handling.
        }
        else
        {
            Packet packet = parseResult.Result;
            //Do something with packet.
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

By throwing an exception when there is invalid input what you are in essence saying is that it is the responsibility of the calling method to ensure that the data is valid, or to deal with the exception if it's not. This perfectly acceptable, although it should ideally make it into the method documentation.

If you're doing this, it would also be best to have a method to validate the input; by providing this the caller can know that the method won't work without needing to suffer the performance hit of a try/catch. If the class is tightly coupled with one or a few other classes that are always going to be providing it with correct input, then this becomes less important (but still not a bad idea).

share|improve this answer

I haven't really developed in C#, but based on my experience with other languages (Java, PHP), I would say this is a perfectly good way to do it. If you want to distinguish the error that you throw from the ones thrown by XMLReader, you could create your own custom Exception that extends the Exception object.

share|improve this answer

The typical pattern is to allways return an int, which is the error code. Real results are passed via out or ref parameters. Some development factories do require this as a conditio sine qua non.

share|improve this answer
2  
I completely disagree with this. To force every method to return an int isn't a pattern, it's an anti-pattern. Methods should return what they're logically supposed to return and throw exceptions if there's an error. What you suggest mixes concerns between logic (the return value) and infrastructure (error handling). Additionally, it forces calling code to jump through hoops to check for an error. –  David Jan 25 '12 at 17:05
3  
The typical pattern in C, perhaps. Not C#. –  Matti Virkkunen Jan 25 '12 at 17:07
1  
I agree with the two commenters above, that's a C pattern and something you see throughout the WinAPI but very much not .Net. –  Chris Haas Jan 25 '12 at 17:08

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