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I understand from Papa Crockford that it's a good idea to use semicolons. And I understand that it's a good idea to use curly braces even to block just one line of JavaScript in the body of an if/then stmt.

So my question is: Where do I place the semicolon? Do I do this:

if (condition) {
   stmt;
} else {
   stmt;
}

or do I do this:

if (condition) {
   stmt
} else {
   stmt
};

or do I leave the semicolon off altogether? (Given that I have decided to use curly braces to block even just 1 line of JavaScript inside the body of an if/then).

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Use the former. –  Josh Jan 25 '12 at 17:07
    
Yeah, it looks like the consent is to use the first. –  Phillip Jan 25 '12 at 17:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Answer is 1st option.

you must read about it for better understanding. this is the very basic thing of javascript.

Reference - 1

Reference - 2

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Thank you for those two references dku.rajkumar! –  Phillip Jan 25 '12 at 17:50
    
you are welcome dude.. –  dku.rajkumar Jan 25 '12 at 17:52

You do the first. Semicolons do not go after the closing braces of if and else statements.

The only time I can think of when you would ever put a semicolon after a closing brace is if you were assigning a function to some sort of property, or creating an object literal:

var obj = { };
obj.func = function() {
    alert("Howdy!");
};
share|improve this answer
    
But I just don't like seeing a semicolon followed by a curly brace. To me, the curly brace is a line terminator as well. –  Phillip Jan 25 '12 at 17:52

The first one is the proper form, because you can have multiple statements and they should be separated by semicolons.

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Ah yes, if that were true, then the other would be true. But what if I only have 1 statement? –  Phillip Jan 25 '12 at 17:51

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