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We are developing a Windows service to be installed on client systems. This application periodically makes calls to a SOAP web service on our server. We are wanting to include the local IP address of the client system in the SOAP requests each time they hit our service for troubleshooting purposes. Looking through other posts on here, I've found the following code to get the list of IPs for the interfaces on a system:

IPAddress[] localIPs = Dns.GetHostAddresses(Dns.GetHostName());

This code is being included in the Windows service. Is there a simple way to determine which IP in this array is assigned to the interface over which the web service call is routed?

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Not really -- the routing happens after the request is built. Best you can do is server-side capture the IP the request came from, but depending on the routing/NAT, you might not see the originator's IP. –  Joe Jan 25 '12 at 19:43
    
@Joe, thanks. So if I'm using an HttpWebRequest object to hit the service, there isn't any way to get the local IP of the interface that sends the request? The local IP is really what we're wanting. Does this sound like a viable alternative -- I tried using the Socket class to connect to the endpoint and then fetched the LocalEndPoint of the socket. Do I risk returning the wrong IP by doing this? I'm thinking it's possible that the socket connection and the service request may not necessarily route over the same interface. –  Poosh Jan 27 '12 at 19:14

3 Answers 3

Returns a List containing IPs on the machine where it's run as long as the adapter is up and not the loopback interface.

public static List<string> DisplayDnsAddresses()
{
    var addresses = NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces()
        .Where(a => a.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up
                    && a.NetworkInterfaceType != NetworkInterfaceType.Loopback)
        .Select(a => a.GetIPProperties())
        .SelectMany(ipp => ipp.UnicastAddresses
            .Select(x => x.Address.ToString()));

    return addresses.ToList();
}

This probably needs to be refined a bit. I'm not sure how to be sure which interface the webservice would use, but if you knew the gateway that had to be used to get to your network, perhaps you could pin it down.

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Thanks for the suggestion, I will look into that some more to see if that's a viable way of determining which inteface the web service is using. –  Poosh Jan 27 '12 at 16:26

You can run the following code in your Windows service to get the IP for any interface on the box.

/// <summary>
/// Returns the IP Address of the given interface
/// </summary>
/// <param name="InterfaceName">Name of the interface</param>
/// <param name="AddressFamily">Address family to search for</param>
/// <returns>IPAddress of assinged IP address</returns>
public IPAddress GetIPAddress(string InterfaceName, System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily AddressFamily)
{
    System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface Interface = GetInterface(InterfaceName);
    if (Interface != null)
    {
        foreach (System.Net.NetworkInformation.UnicastIPAddressInformation IP in Interface.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses) 
        {
            //Match address family
            if(IP.Address.AddressFamily != AddressFamily)
                continue;

            //Check for IPv6 conditions since we can easily have multiple IPs
            if(IP.Address.AddressFamily == System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily.InterNetworkV6 && (IP.Address.IsIPv6LinkLocal || IP.AddressPreferredLifetime != uint.MaxValue || IP.AddressValidLifetime != uint.MaxValue))
                continue;

            //We've found the IP
            return IP.Address;
        }
    }

    return null;
}

/// <summary>
/// Returns the Network Interface for the given windows name
/// </summary>
/// <param name="InterfaceName">Interface name to get (ie Local Area Connection)</param>
/// <returns>Network Interface, or null if not found</returns>
System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface GetInterface(string InterfaceName)
{
    if (InterfaceName == null || InterfaceName.Length == 0)
        return null;

    foreach (System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface Interface in NetworkInterfaceArray)
    {
        if (Interface.Name == InterfaceName)
            return Interface;
    }

    return null;
}
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Thanks. Is there any additional logic that could be added to determine which interface is being used to hit the web service? We're wanting to get a single local IP from which the request originated. –  Poosh Jan 27 '12 at 16:36

If you are using WCF 3.5 or later you can get the client's IP address in the service directly by using message properties as shown in the code in this blog

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Thank you. I should have mentioned that the client is not hitting a WCF service. We don't want to capture the IP address within the service they're hitting because we want to make sure we're logging the local IP of the system from which the request is originating. Is there a way to determine this in the long running Windows service running on the client end? –  Poosh Jan 27 '12 at 16:24

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