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I'm working on a project in which xml feed is fetched from a different server through cron job to my server and saved it as a file, and my website uses that xml file to display data on website.

But the problem is that the xml file is two large around (4mb) and every time user hit the site, the server get the file(from same location) and parse it and server the user, so if 1000 hits the server would pull it 1000 times (thats the overhead I want to resolve)

I tried to use memcache but that is also limited to 2mb.

Can anyone tell me which is the best method to save that big xml either in DB, as a xml file, or in memcache, should I break that big xml to categories??

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the new xml feed is fetch after every 3 to 10 min later and replace the old one – MZH Jan 25 '12 at 17:22
    
It depends on the contents of the XML feed. If it was a product feed with categories in it, maybe you could split it after you have retrieved it by category into smaller files. Alternatively, have a script parse the xml into a database as that should allow you to be more selective as to what you retrieve. What sort of content are you working with? – Raul Marengo Jan 25 '12 at 17:25
    
very large products xml(around 4mb file) hang the browser for a while when open, and the problem is the categories keep on changing – MZH Jan 25 '12 at 17:27
    
even if I split the xml into chunks it will be big, so would it be feasible to store that into db, each row will be in kilobytes – MZH Jan 25 '12 at 17:28
    
Why not save xml to local file then update xml every 1 hour, 2 hour, etc. – Zulkhaery Basrul Jan 25 '12 at 17:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would create a database, have the cron job fetch and then parse the XML and insert everything into the DB, and only serve users from the database.

To make sure the data is consistent you can implement basic versioning. Store the current version number somewhere; whenever you get a new XML, store the next version into the database, then update the current version number, cleanup periodically.

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Thanks all of u guys, should I save it to db, even one table row is very large(in kilobytes)?? – MZH Jan 25 '12 at 19:05
    
the server for records, also the xml refresh after every 3 to 5 mins so it would not be a good idea to save into db as every row for every product. Will it be suitable to save every category xml into db row, Like 1 Row for one category, then each row will hold data in KB – MZH Jan 27 '12 at 19:20
    
Individual xml file is around 60,000 lines. Splitting contents into different tables and inserting into database seems a nice idea but say I have 1000 xml files each day. How about dumping everything in a big field and later parsing that text/string as a xml file and returning results, every time user queries. I know it creates overhead of parsing such huge data everytime, but surely it solves the database rows limit. What is the best option among two, will I run out of rows if I insert those values in each row. – razorxpress Mar 11 '12 at 3:14

You can implement a native PHP cache system, which no have memory limit like Memcached, read this: http://www.the-art-of-web.com/php/buffer/

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Using memcache for 4MB of data is not a good option, also you are already experiencing the issues with XML files. as answered by @ori the better option would be to store the xml data to some database and serve users from database.
Find this link MySQL 5.5 Load XML Syntax for example of how to load XML to database.
One more point, if you are getting this XML as a web service (like SOAP), there should be an option to get only updated data. this way, you can save some download time too.

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No its just xml no soap response – MZH Jan 25 '12 at 19:05

You should consider 28msec to store your XML data: http://www.28msec.com

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But the problem is that the xml file is two large around (4mb) and every time user hit the site, the server get the file(from same location) and parse it and server the user, so if 1000 hits the server would pull it 1000 times (thats the overhead I want to resolve)

So you already cache the network access, but you do not cache the parsing so far. Why not cache the parsing as well?! This would reduce the time needed to display the result as the XML has not changed and so won't the parsing.

If it's still too slow then, you can look forward where to improve speed next, e.g. cache each category or the like. As you have not shown any code nor have outlined what you do with the data specifically it's not possible to give more suggestions.

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No I've not cached anything, I've just saved that xml on my server and parse it when someone hit the server for records, also the xml refresh after every 3 to 5 mins so it would not be a good idea to save into db as every row for every product. Will it be suitable to save every category xml into db row, Like 1 Row for one category, then each row will hold data in KB – MZH Jan 27 '12 at 19:19
    
Storing the XML on disc as you already do: I would call it a cache because it caches the network access. It's a file-based cache. It can make sense to add an additional cache (like caching the parsing by storing it into a DB by category like you suggest). Depending on what you do, it can even make sense to keep each entry in the DB in a normalized form so that you can simple DB queries when your site is hit. If it's still too slow you can then even cache the DB queries for some minutes. This all depends on what you do, start with the part that takes the longest so caching is most effective. – hakre Jan 28 '12 at 11:54

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