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I have some C code that should print the entire contents of a file. The program previously prints a file just fine, but when it prints a second I keep seeing a Unicode character where there definitely should not be.

int c = fgetc(file);
putchar((!isprint(c) ? : c));

(wrapped in a while(!feof(file)))
Should only print ASCII printable characters, unless I'm mistaken. Regardless, the first thing it prints is \357\277\275, which isn't ASCII, and isn't printable.

The file contains only this: foo+bar.foo+t-bar.foo+completely fake

and it prints this: �foo+bar.foo+t-bar.foo+completely fake (with a newline between the strange character and the rest).

Simply printing it all (a la putchar(c)) puts the exact same character at the end of the line.

I've even tried using another file (by renaming the old and using a soft link to another), but I get the exact same results.

It also does this if the file is empty.

The file is completely plain text, created with vim, and there isn't anything special about it.

Here's the original code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main(void)
{
    char *headp = "../include/header";
    char *listp = "../.piclist";
    FILE *head, *list;

    puts("Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8\nExpires: 0\n");

    puts("<!DOCTYPE html>\n<html lang='en'>\n<head>");
    puts("\t<title>Foo</title>");
    puts("\t<link rel='stylesheet' href='/css/main.css' />");
    puts("\t<link rel='stylesheet' href='/css/foo.css' />");
    puts("</head>\n<body>");

    head = fopen(headp, "r");
    if (errno) {
            perror("cannot open include/header");
            errno = 0;
    } else {
            while (!feof(head)) putchar(fgetc(head));
            putchar('\n');
    fclose(head);
    }

    list = fopen(listp, "r");
    if (errno) perror("cannot open .piclist");
    else {
    while (!feof(list)) {
            while (!feof(list)) {
                    int c = fgetc(list);
                    putchar((!isprint(c) ? : c));
            }
    }
    fclose(list);
    } /* else */

    fputs("\n<footer>\n\t<hr />\n\t<p>Copyright 2011-2012 the ", stdout);
    fputs("<a href='mailto:foo@example.com'> ", stdout);
    fputs("Foo Bar of Baz</a> of ", stdout);
    fputs("<a href='http://blah.org'>Blah United ", stdout);
    fputs("</a></p>\n</footer>\n</body>\n</html>\n",stdout);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
... also when the file is empty, because your feof() use is wrong. Please post the real code. –  wildplasser Jan 25 '12 at 17:31
    
Could you show a complete, compilable example that demonstrates the problem? –  NPE Jan 25 '12 at 17:32
1  
putchar((!isprint(c) ? : c)); <- how does it even compile? –  user529758 Jan 25 '12 at 17:37
    
@H2C03 it's a GNU extension gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Conditionals.html –  ouah Jan 25 '12 at 17:41
    
The "strange character" is U+FFFD, encoded in UTF-8. –  dan04 Jan 25 '12 at 17:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

DONT USE feof() (at least not the way you use it)

Also, your usage of errno is wrong. errno only contains a usable value after some operation indicated an error return (mostly by NULL, or -1 as a return value)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main(void)
{
    char *headp = "../include/header";
    char *listp = "../.piclist";
    FILE *head, *list;
    int ch;

    puts("Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8\nExpires: 0\n");

    puts("<!DOCTYPE html>\n<html lang='en'>\n<head>");
    puts("\t<title>Warrenton Latin School | Gallery</title>");
    puts("\t<link rel='stylesheet' href='/css/main.css' />");
    puts("\t<link rel='stylesheet' href='/css/gallery.css' />");
    puts("</head>\n<body>");

    head = fopen(headp, "r");
    if (!head) {
            perror("cannot open include/header");
            errno = 0;
    } else {
        while (1) {
            ch = fgetc(head);
            if (ch == EOF) break;
            putchar(ch);
            }
        putchar('\n');
        fclose(head);
    }

    list = fopen(listp, "r");
    if (!list) perror("cannot open .piclist");
    else while (1) {
        ch = fgetc(list);
        if (ch == EOF) break;
        putchar((!isprint(c) ? : c));
    }
    fclose(list);

    fputs("\n<footer>\n\t<hr />\n\t<p>Copyright 2011-2012 the ", stdout);
    fputs("<a href='mailto:warrentonlatinschool@gmail.com'> ", stdout);
    fputs("Warrenton Latin School</a> co-op of ", stdout);
    fputs("<a href='http://warrentonumc.org'>Warrenton United ", stdout);
    fputs("Methodist Church</a></p>\n</footer>\n</body>\n</html>\n",stdout);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why should I not use feof()? –  Aidan Medcalf Jan 25 '12 at 18:05
    
Well, my use of errno and perror has worked; although I've only tested that when the files weren't there. –  Aidan Medcalf Jan 25 '12 at 18:08
1  
feof() returns the error after it occured. In this case: after the last char has been read, fgetc() returns EOF on every subsequent call. You "consume" the first EOF (and consider it a valid character, and print it (it will probably become 0xff in the output file)) And only after that, feof() returns not zero. –  wildplasser Jan 25 '12 at 18:10
    
I see. Thank you. –  Aidan Medcalf Jan 25 '12 at 18:10
    
I cleaned up the code to not use feof() like that, and now my problem is definitely fixed. Thank you. –  Aidan Medcalf Jan 25 '12 at 18:54

Ignoring possible mistakes in your code isprint() considers all characters printable, except 0x00 - 0x1f and 0x7f.

Things like UTF BOM and other characters outside 7-bit ANSI can still be printed (despite the fact their meaning might change depending on the encoding).

share|improve this answer
    
Hm. Though using if (c < 127 && c > 31) putchar(c); had the exact same effect. –  Aidan Medcalf Jan 25 '12 at 17:48
    
No, characters above 127 are still conisdered printable. –  Mario Jan 25 '12 at 17:50
    
By same effect, I meant the Unicode character still prints. –  Aidan Medcalf Jan 25 '12 at 17:57
    
With the snipped from your comment it shouldn't print unicode characters. –  Mario Jan 25 '12 at 18:30

When you leave the 2nd operator of ?: empty, it equals to the result of the conditional. For non-printable characters, isprintc(c) returns 0, therefore the conditional part of the trenary operator is !0 which equals to 1. Therefore putchar attempts to print an invalid ASCII character and breaks.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Would it be legal to have an empty string constant there, or is there something else I should do for that effect? –  Aidan Medcalf Jan 25 '12 at 17:43
    
Move the conditional outside: if(!condition) putchar(...); You can't define an empty character ('') and \0 (or the first element of an empty string; mind the data types) would output \0. –  Mario Jan 25 '12 at 17:51

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