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is there a way to make this code work as intended?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template<typename T> class templated{
public:
    static void f(){
        cout<<"doing something generically"<<endl;
    }
};

template<> class templated<int>{
public:
    static void g(){
        cout<<"doing something else, but specific to int"<<endl;
        f();
    }
};

int main(){
    templated<int>::g();
}

G++ complains that f is not declared in scope. I have tried all the possible variations in calling f() (templated<int>::f(), putting a dummy declaration in templated, move the declaration outside of class definition...), all of which failed, so I'll omit them here.

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And did you try templated<int>::f()? I don't really get it. –  ypnos Jan 25 '12 at 18:06
1  
primary class template template<typename T> class templated is not a type whose static member you can call. What is the purpose of doing that? –  Mr.Anubis Jan 25 '12 at 18:07
    
@ypnos sure I did. But the answers seem to assert that plainly I can't do what I want. –  Lorenzo Pistone Jan 25 '12 at 18:07
    
@ypnos it won't work –  Mr.Anubis Jan 25 '12 at 18:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, a specialization is totally separate from the base template and doesn't "inherit" anything from it.

Perhaps you can add a free function that can be called from everywhere?

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yeah, I'm considering both free functions and inheritance. I wonder why generic and specialized class templates are totally separate: this way you have to redefine the class functioning even if you have to modify only a little part of the behavior. –  Lorenzo Pistone Jan 25 '12 at 19:12
    
They are separate because you declare them separately. If you want some common functionality, you can put that in a common base class - just like we always do. –  Bo Persson Jan 25 '12 at 19:17

You can inherit in this particular case since you're not using template argument type:

template<> class templated<int>: templated<void>{
public:
    static void g(){
        cout<<"doing something else, but specific to int"<<endl;
        f();
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
wow, this is tripping. How should I read this? A template specialization which inherits from his generic form, or just a class with a dummy template list, with name 'templated', which inherits from a dummy version of templated? –  Lorenzo Pistone Jan 25 '12 at 18:16
    
does this approach have any caveat? –  Lorenzo Pistone Jan 25 '12 at 18:18
    
@Lorenzo - templated<void> uses the base template, so it is allowed. However, if it is, the template is also pretty useless (can't have members of type T = void, so what is it used for?). –  Bo Persson Jan 25 '12 at 18:21
    
This can work in some cases, but in a lot of real-world-scenarios, f() probably depends on the template type, making this not really an option. –  TBohne Jan 25 '12 at 18:34
    
the solution is interesting, but I really need to have a sort of "inheritance" between generic and specialized templates. If it can't happen, I'm going to throw in somehow classical inheritance. You get the votes, but Bo Persson gets the answer accepted :) –  Lorenzo Pistone Jan 25 '12 at 19:05

Your specialized version simply doesn't have an f() (there's no "inheritance" going on here).

If you want inheritance, you should probably consider moving f() into a base class.

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You can use a some kind of wrapper, some like this:

    template<typename T>
    class templated_core
    {
      public:
        static void f()
        {
          cout<<"doing something generically"<<endl;
        }
    };

    template<typename T>
    class templated : public templated_core<T>
    {
    };

    template<>
    class templated<int> : public templated_core<int>
    {
      public:
        static void g()
        {
          cout<<"doing something else, but specific to int"<<endl;
          f();
        }
    };
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