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I have some code in a common library to support internationalization. The basic idea is that given the fully qualified name of a RESX file location, you can look up values using a markup extension:

    resx:ResxProperty.Name="SampleApp.Common.Resources.MainWindow"
    Title="{Resx Key=Window.Title}" 
    Icon="{Resx Key=Window.Icon}"

To find the RESX file there is a routine to search all assemblies as shown below, and it works fine when the RESX file is in the same assembly as the xaml. BUT it breaks down when it is not.

Consider the solution structure below, where SampleApp.Wpf has the calling XAML and has a dependency on both the LocalizationLib and SampleApp.Common.

enter image description here

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies() does not have SampleApp.Common at run time (although it does at design time).

How can I modify this code so it will know about SampleApp.Common at runtime?

Cheers,
Berryl

Library code

/// <summary>
/// Find the assembly that contains the type
/// </summary>
/// <returns>The assembly if loaded (otherwise null)</returns>
public static Assembly FindResourceAssembly(string resxName)
{
    // check the entry assembly first - this will short circuit a lot of searching
    //
    var assembly = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly();
    if (assembly != null && HasSpecifiedResx(assembly, resxName))
        return assembly;

    var assemblies = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies();
    foreach (var searchAssembly in assemblies)
    {
        // skip system assemblies
        var name = searchAssembly.FullName;
        if (_isSystemAssembly(name)) continue;

        if (HasSpecifiedResx(searchAssembly, resxName))
            return searchAssembly;
    }
    return null;
}

UPDATE

More details.

SampleApp.Wpf is targeting .net 4.0. Below are the references for it as displayed in Visual Studio.

enter image description here

The only project references in there are Infralution.Localization.Wpf and SampleApp.Common, both of which also target .Net 4.0.

Based on Metro Smurf's input I tried using assembly.GetReferencedAssemblies(). When I use this method, the VS designer does NOT find SampleApp.Common, and the following AssemblyNames are known in the debugger at runtime:

{System.Reflection.AssemblyName[6]}
    [0]: {PresentationFramework, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35}
    [1]: {mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [2]: {System.Xaml, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [3]: {Infralution.Localization.Wpf, Version=2.1.2.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=547ccae517a004b5}
    [4]: {System, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [5]: {PresentationCore, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35}

And when I use the origional AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies(), the designer DOES know SampleApp.Common, and these assemblies are known at runtime:

?AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
{System.Reflection.RuntimeAssembly[21]}
    [0]: {mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [1]: {Microsoft.VisualStudio.HostingProcess.Utilities, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a}
    [2]: {System.Windows.Forms, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [3]: {System.Drawing, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a}
    [4]: {System, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [5]: {Microsoft.VisualStudio.HostingProcess.Utilities.Sync, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a}
    [6]: {Microsoft.VisualStudio.Debugger.Runtime, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a}
    [7]: {vshost32, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a}
    [8]: {System.Data, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [9]: {System.Core, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [10]: {System.Xml, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [11]: {Microsoft.CSharp, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a}
    [12]: {System.Xml.Linq, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [13]: {System.Data.DataSetExtensions, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [14]: {System.Xaml, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089}
    [15]: {WindowsBase, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35}
    [16]: {PresentationCore, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35}
    [17]: {PresentationFramework, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35}
    [18]: {SampleApp.Wpf, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null}
    [19]: {System.Configuration, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a}
    [20]: {Infralution.Localization.Wpf, Version=2.1.2.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=547ccae517a004b5}

In both cases, SampleApp.Common isn't known at runtime. For the fun of it, I loaded that assembly in the debugger and got:

?Assembly.Load("SampleApp.Common")
{SampleApp.Common, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null}
    [System.Reflection.RuntimeAssembly]: {SampleApp.Common, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null}
    CodeBase: "file:///C:/.../SampleApp.Wpf/bin/Release/SampleApp.Common.DLL"
    EntryPoint: null
    EscapedCodeBase: "file:///C:.../SampleApp.Wpf/bin/Release/SampleApp.Common.DLL"
    Evidence: {System.Security.Policy.Evidence}
    FullName: "SampleApp.Common, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null"
    GlobalAssemblyCache: false
    HostContext: 0
    ImageRuntimeVersion: "v4.0.30319"
    IsDynamic: false
    IsFullyTrusted: true
    Location: "C:\\...\\SampleApp.Wpf\\bin\\Release\\SampleApp.Common.dll"
    ManifestModule: {SampleApp.Common.dll}
    PermissionSet: {<PermissionSet class="System.Security.PermissionSet"
version="1"
Unrestricted="true"/>
}
    ReflectionOnly: false
    SecurityRuleSet: Level2

I also tried Metro Smurf's suggestion to reference a static string from SampleApp.Common in SampleApp.Wpf. No change on that one, although I guess it further proves that SampleApp.Common is properly referenced.

Other things to try on SampleApp.Common might include adding an EntryPoint, a SNK, or a HashAlgorithm.

the FIX

asm.GetReferencedAssemblies sounds like the ticket, but it only returns assemblies which are loaded in the memory, and assemblies aren't loaded if they aren't referenced in the code (as in it's confusing that while also quite proper to say one project has a reference to another, but that isn't the sort of reference this method returns).

It turns out that AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies() works the same way.

Metro Smurf was on the right track, but apparently a static reference won't get the assembly loaded, but creating a type instance from the assembly will. So:

Console.WriteLine(Class1.MyDummyString)  // this won't do it
Console.WriteLine(new Class1())  // finally, the assembly is loaded

As much as I dislike creating a dummy class, in this case it is an easy fix; I can leave the original library code as is.

share|improve this question
1  
Curious... why would the app be aware of Common at design time, but not run-time? –  Metro Smurf Jan 25 '12 at 18:27
    
Agreed. Maybe in design time Common is somehow loaded but at runtime it is somehow not loaded? –  Berryl Jan 26 '12 at 13:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may want to consider using the Assembly.GetReferencedAssemblies Method. However, if I'm not mistaken, you'll need to exclude the framework assemblies as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried GetReferencedAssemblies and got the same result. I saw another post that seemed to say that an assembly referenced by Visual Studio is not necessarily one that will be known by reflection but I haven't grokked that yet. –  Berryl Jan 26 '12 at 13:07
    
Does SampleApp.Wpf have a direct reference to SampleApp.Common? If so, is the property for "Copy Local" set to True for the SmapleApp.Common assembly referenced in the SampleApp.Wpf project. (right click on SampleApp.Common in the references of SampleApp.Wpf and select properties to view the Copy Local property) –  Metro Smurf Jan 26 '12 at 15:27
    
Copy Local was at true already. I am guessing that SampleApp.Common is loaded by the designer and therefore available, but not loaded or available at runtime. But why? There must be something we are missing here. Cheers –  Berryl Jan 27 '12 at 15:12
1  
Probably something so small that it'll be a palm-to-face moment. Could you try creating a class in Common (say a static string) and then using that string to display something in the WPF project. If that works at run-time, then we know that Common is being correctly referenced. Also, double check the HasSpecifiedResx method to verify the logic against the namespaces/naming conventions used in Common. In the end, I believe you'll have to use the GetReferencedAssemblies method, though. –  Metro Smurf Jan 27 '12 at 15:28
    
Yeah, a palm-to-face moment would nice since right now it feels like a hammer-to-face moment!. See the update to the post for what I can discern so far. Cheers –  Berryl Jan 27 '12 at 16:19

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