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I am trying to sort my mysql database referencing two columns alphabetically where company_name is the primary sort but if there is no company_name then sort by last_name. I will list an example below.

company_name: (primary sort column)
1 ABC Trucking
2 Genius Heating
3
4 Xtreme Windows

last_name: (secondary column)
1 Bryant
2 Rogers
3 Flint
4 Lewis

Sorts like this:
1 ABC Trucking
3 Flint
2 Genius Heating
4 Xtreme Windows

Is this even possible or should i just merge these into an array and sort them using php?

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2 Answers 2

Just make select with a column as 'name' using a case and order by it. Best shown by example.

SELECT
CASE WHEN company_name IS NULL THEN last_name ELSE company_name END AS name
FROM mytable
ORDER BY name ASC

If you really wanted to, you can also used the case statement right in the order by clause.
I think the above is really a better solution to your problem because you no longer even have the logic in the php, but you may disagree.

SELECT company_name, last_name
FROM mytable
ORDER BY CASE WHEN company_name IS NULL THEN last_name ELSE company_name END ASC

EDIT: I only assumed company_name IS NULL is correct for you case. If you need to do this on a different condition then thats you're own exercise. Is it null? or should be comparing it to '' instead?

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Can the CASE work when fields are blank and not null? –  Lawrence Gadette Jan 25 '12 at 19:05
    
I can go backward and make the field null if its empty or I can evaluate it as ''. Right now the field is not null its empty. –  Lawrence Gadette Jan 25 '12 at 19:11
    
The condition is just like if you were going to use it in a where clause. select * from tablename where company_name = '', If that gets you all the rows with blank company_names then you'll want to use company_name = '' as the condition. –  user606723 Jan 25 '12 at 19:21
    
I can confirm that this works nicely in SQLite too! :) –  Christopher Orr Mar 13 '13 at 16:00

Borrowing from user606723's answer, but showing how this is more commonly implemented in MySQL, which is to use IFNULL().

IFNULL() returns the first expression, except when the first expression is null, it will return the second expression. It's designed for these types of scenarios.

SELECT
  IFNULL(company_name, last_name) AS name
FROM mytable
ORDER BY name

Edit

If company_name holds blanks instead of NULLs, then you can do this:

SELECT
  IF(company_name <> '', company_name, last_name) AS name
FROM mytable
ORDER BY name

With an IF statement, if the first expression evaluates to true, then it returns the second expression, otherwise, it returns the third expression.

If you might have NULL or blank, then this will work:

SELECT
  IF(company_name IS NOT NULL AND company_name <> '', company_name, last_name) AS name
FROM mytable
ORDER BY name
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Both your example and 606723's almost work. I feel like im missing something small. output looks like this. Sorts like this: 1 ABC Trucking 2 Genius Heating 4 Xtreme Windows missing the row with only the last name. –  Lawrence Gadette Jan 25 '12 at 18:50
    
Ah, it's not NULL then, it's blank. You can use an IF statement for that. I'm updating the answer now. –  Marcus Adams Jan 25 '12 at 18:52
1  
Is there really any advantage to an IF statement (or is it really a function) like this? I feel like the case statements are more universally correct. I honestly see this as bad practice, but perhaps I am ignorant of something. –  user606723 Jan 25 '12 at 19:00
    
Perfect. I do have a related issue though. I need my record ID's for use in the while statement. The only array identifier available now is $row[name]. I need $row[ID] also. Any thoughts? –  Lawrence Gadette Jan 25 '12 at 19:03
    
@user606723, if by universally correct, you mean SQL92, then yes, I agree, CASE is more universal. I'm guessing they would execute the same. –  Marcus Adams Jan 25 '12 at 19:15

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