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I have 2 input variables:

  • a vector of p-values (p) with N elements (unsorted)
  • and N x M matrix with p-values obtained by random permutations (pr) with M iterations. N is quite large, 10K to 100K or more. M let's say 100.

I'm estimating the False Discovery Rate (FDR) for each element of p representing how many p-values from random permutations will pass if the current p-value (from p) will be the threshold.

I wrote the function with ARRAYFUN, but it takes lot of time for large N (2 min for N=20K), comparable to for-loop.

function pfdr = fdr_from_random_permutations(p, pr)
%# ... skipping arguments checks
pfdr = arrayfun( @(x) mean(sum(pr<=x))./sum(p<=x), p);

Any ideas how to make it faster?

Comments about statistical issues here are also welcome.

The test data can be generated as p = rand(N,1); pr = rand(N,M);.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+100

Well, the trick was indeed sorting the vectors. I give credit to @EgonGeerardyn for that. Also, there is no need to use mean. You can just divide everything afterwards by M. When p is sorted, finding the amount of values that are less than current x, is just a running index. pr is a more interesting case - I used a running index called place to discover how many elements are less than x.

Edit(2): Here is the fastest version I come up with:

 function Speedup2()
    N = 10000/4 ;
    M = 100/4 ;
    p = rand(N,1); pr = rand(N,M);

    tic
    pfdr = arrayfun( @(x) mean(sum(pr<=x))./sum(p<=x), p);
    toc

    tic
    out = zeros(numel(p),1);
    [p,sortIndex] = sort(p);
    pr = sort(pr(:));
    pr(end+1) = Inf;
    place = 1;
    N =  numel(pr);
    for i=1:numel(p)
        x = p(i);
        while pr(place)<=x
            place = place+1;
        end
        exp1a = place-1;
        exp2 = i;
        out(i) = exp1a/exp2;
    end
    out(sortIndex) = out/ M;
    toc
    disp(max(abs(pfdr-out)));

end

And the benchmark results for N = 10000/4 ; M = 100/4 :

Elapsed time is 0.898689 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.007697 seconds.
2.220446049250313e-016

and for N = 10000 ; M = 100 ;

Elapsed time is 39.730695 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.088870 seconds.
2.220446049250313e-016

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1  
Sorry for being away pressured by a deadline. Your code is great and the fastest among all suggested. The best trick is pr(:). Not doing it gave me a headache. And dividing to M at the end, of course. Very nice. This is actually second example here when I found that loops can be faster than vectorized code. I'm going to accept your answer with the award. Спасибо огромное!!! –  yuk Feb 1 '12 at 21:39
    
@yuk, the last part of your comment was quite unexpected :). About the bounty - a pleasant surprise indeed, I was sure that you would select Egons answer. –  Andrey Feb 1 '12 at 23:20
    
After more tests I found a bug in your code. It appears it's possible that largest value of pr is smaller then largest value of p. Then in while pr(place)<=x place becomes end+1 and the statement returns index out of bound error. I added sz = N*M; before for-loop then while place <= sz && pr(place) <= x. The code becomes a little slower but still the fastest comparing to others. Any better solution? Please update the answer for further readers. Thanks. –  yuk Feb 2 '12 at 17:09
    
@yuk, thanks for pointing that out. I fixed it like you suggested. I will think about something better. Maybe adding a dummy to the end of pr –  Andrey Feb 2 '12 at 18:11
    
Very nice. Thanks! –  yuk Feb 2 '12 at 19:34

First of all, tr to analyze this using the profiler. Profiling should ALWAYS be the first step when trying to improve performance. We can all guess at what is causing your performance drop, but the only way to be sure and focus on the right part is to inspect the profiler report.

I didn't run the profiler on your code, as I don't want to generate test data to do so; but I have some ideas about what work is being carried out in vain. In your function mean(sum(pr<=x))./sum(p<=x), you are repeatedly summing over p<=x. All in all, one call includes N comparisons and N-1 summations. So for both, you have behavior that is quadratic in N when all N values of p are calculated.

If you step through a sorted version of p, you need less calculations and comparisons, as you can keep track of a running sum (i.e. behavior that is linear in N). I guess a similar method could be applied to the other part of the calculation.

edit: The implementation of my idea as expressed above:

function pfdr = fdr(p,pr)
[N, M] = size(pr);
[p,   idxP] = sort(p);
[pr] = sort(pr(:));

pfdr = NaN(N,1);

parfor iP = 1:N
    x = p(iP);
    m = sum(pr<=x)/M;
    pfdr(iP) = m/iP;
end

pfdr(idxP) = pfdr;

If you have access to the parallel computing toolbox, the parfor loop will allow you to gain some performance. I used two basic ideas: mean(sum(pr<=x)) is actually equal to sum(pr(:)<=x)/M. On the other hand, since p is sorted, this allows you to just take the index as the number of elements (in the assumption that every element is unique, otherwise you'll have to work with unique to do the full rigorous analysis).

As you should already know very well by running the profiler yourself, the line m = sum(pr<=x)/M; is the main resource hog. This can be tackled similarly to p by making use of the sorted nature of pr.

I tested my code (both for identical results and for time consumption) against yours. For N=20e3; M=100, I get about 63 seconds to run your code and 43 seconds to run mine on my main computer (MATLAB 2011a on 64 bit Arch Linux, 8 GiB RAM, Core i7 860). For smaller values of M the gain is larger. But this gain is in part due to parallelization.

edit2: Apparently, I came to very similar results as Andrey, my result would have been very similar had I pursued the same approach.

However, I realised that there are some built-in functions that do more or less what you need, i.e. quite similar to determining the empirical cumulative density function. And this can be done by constructing the histogram:

function pfdr = fdr(p,pr)
[N, M] = size(pr);
[p, idxP] = sort(p);

count = histc(pr(:), [0; p]);
count = cumsum(count(1:N));

pfdr = count./(1:N).';

pfdr(idxP) = pfdr/M;

For the same M and N as above, this code takes 228 milliseconds on my computer. It takes 104 milliseconds for Andrey's parameters, so on my computer it turns out a bit slower, but I think this code is far more readable than intricate for loops (as was the case in both our examples).

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Thanks. Your answer is very useful, especially the last paragraph. I understand I'm doing a lot of useless steps with arrayfun, and that the function can be optimized with sorting and even using for-loop. But I think I should accept the answer with a code (will work on it too). The test data can be generated easily as p = rand(N,1); pr = rand(N,M); –  yuk Jan 26 '12 at 17:44
    
Your code is definitely better in readability terms. But I think that the for loops approach has even greater potential for optimizing, since one can write a mex file. –  Andrey Jan 29 '12 at 21:01
    
@Andrey: that certainly is right, for loops are better to port your code to MEX (or other environments). It just depends on what the final purpose of that code is. –  Egon Jan 29 '12 at 21:20
    
I'm really appreciate your answer. The idea was great and the second function was very smart and clear. However, @Andrey's code turned to be about twice faster and I'm going to accept his answer. I think using loop with stopping condition in this case is optimal, rather than working with whole vectors. Thanks a lot anyway anyway. I wish I could give more than one upvote. –  yuk Feb 1 '12 at 21:42
    
I think you did a great job here, Egon. Under different final purpose your code might had been chosen as well. –  Andrey Feb 3 '12 at 9:01

Following the discussion between me and Andrey in this question, this very late answer is just to prove to Andrey that vectorized solutions are still faster than JIT'ed loops, they sometimes just aren't as easy to find.

I am more than willing to remove this answer if it is deemed inappropriate by the OP.

Now, on to business, here's the original arrayfun, looped version by Andrey, and vectorized version by Egon:

function test

    clc

    N = 10000/4 ;
    M = 100/4 ;
    p = rand(N,1);
    pr = rand(N,M);

    %% first option

    tic

    pfdr = arrayfun( @(x) mean(sum(pr<=x))./sum(p<=x), p);

    toc


    %% second option

    tic

    out = zeros(numel(p),1);
    [p2,sortIndex] = sort(p);
    pr2 = sort(pr(:));
    pr2(end+1) = Inf;
    place = 1;    
    for i=1:numel(p2)
        x = p2(i);
        while pr2(place)<=x
            place = place+1;
        end
        exp1a = place-1;
        exp2 = i;
        out(i) = exp1a/exp2;
    end
    out(sortIndex) = out/ M;

    toc

    %% third option

    tic
    [p2,sortIndex] = sort(p);

    count = histc(pr2(:), [0; p2]);
    count = cumsum(count(1:N));

    out = count./(1:N).';

    out(sortIndex) = out/M;

    toc

end

Results on my laptop:

Elapsed time is 0.916196 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.011429 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.007328 seconds.

and for N=1000; M = 100; :

Elapsed time is 38.082718 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.127052 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.042686 seconds.

So: vectorized is 2-3 times faster.

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Well, I don't know what to say. On my computer the timings are different. I've got the second option running faster. So did the OP when he measured. I guess that it is machine dependent. –  Andrey Oct 29 '12 at 10:50
    
Anyhow, you deserve +1 for your effort :) –  Andrey Oct 29 '12 at 10:51
    
@Andrey: Interesting...My laptop here has an Intel Core i3, so 2 physical cores, 2 hyperthreading fake ones. I ran this on Matlab R2010b. What do you have? –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 29 '12 at 10:58
    
2012a, 64bit, Intel core i7 cpu. –  Andrey Oct 29 '12 at 11:46

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