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I'm trying to help a coworker get something compiled - essentially, he was trying to reduce dependencies for a small executable we need to make from a larger software system.

I'm not sure I can fully explain the problem as I don't completely understand it... but I'm going to show what's going on here:

Library A:  File: A.h

namespace CF {
    typedef sometype B;
};

Library C:   File C.h

//Forward declare Class
class CF::B;

Class D {
    public:
        B* UseB();
};

Library C:   File C.cpp

#include "C.h"
#include "A.h"
using CF::B;

B* D::UseB()
{
    return new B;
}

Sorry, I know this looks a little crazy but I have tried to simplify it from the set of files that we're actually dealing with.

We're typically getting either a multiple definition error on CF::B, or when we play with the code and change it around, sometimes in the CPP file it just doesn't recognize the type of CF::B.

I guess my first question is... can I forward declare the typedef like we've tried, or is there some other way to deal with the fact that B is a typedef in CF namespace, and we don't want it to be directly included in the C.h file?

share|improve this question
    
Do the headers have proper include guards? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 25 '12 at 19:15
    
Yes they do all have the standard inclusion guards (#ifndef #define #endif). –  w00te Jan 25 '12 at 19:23
    
How do I forward declare a typedef from another file so there isn't a dependency in the header file? that's probably a good first step. –  w00te Jan 25 '12 at 19:24
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A forward declaration would be more like

namespace CF { class B; }

The compiler cannot make anything out of CF::B unless it already knows CF to be a namespace.

You also cannot forward declare a typedef, because the compiler must know if B is a class or a built in type. Some built in types have special rules, like char* or void*.

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This wasn't a complete solution, but it's advanced the build a little farther so we're making more progress - so I think it was definitely the best I'll get given the sloppy question :) thank you very much for the help! +1. –  w00te Jan 25 '12 at 19:54

This will probably help you:

a.h:

#ifndef NAMESPACE_A
#define NAMESPACE_A

namespace A
{
    class B
    {
        public: int i;
    };
}
#endif

c.h:

#ifndef NAMESPACE_A
#define NAMESPACE_A
namespace A
{
    class B;
}
#endif

class D
{
    public:
        A::B* UseB();
};

main.cpp:

#include "a.h"
#include "c.h"
using A::B;

B* D::UseB()
{
    return new B();
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    D* d = new D();
    B* b = d->UseB();
    b->i = 1;
    return 0;
}

... works fine for me ;)

share|improve this answer
    
I think the fact that CF::B is a typedef rather than a class definition is critical to the question... –  ildjarn Jan 25 '12 at 19:42
    
+1 and thank you for the help - I'll pay more attention to the namespacing like you indicated :) –  w00te Jan 25 '12 at 19:54

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