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I need to execute some custom code before IControllerFactory.GetControllerInstance() is called.

I have looked at using HtppApplication.BeginRequest event, but that would execute my code for every request made to the server (include requests for static resources) - not ideal.

Is there an extensibility point in MVC that I can use to achieve this?

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if you don't want to call it on BeginRequest when do you want to run it? ApplicationStart? –  Chase Florell Jan 25 '12 at 20:26
    
After BeginRequest, ideally. I could run it within BeginRequest, but I don't want it to execute for static resource requests, if possible. –  Arnold Zokas Jan 25 '12 at 20:31
    
So you only want to run it on Controller requests? –  Chase Florell Jan 25 '12 at 20:32
    
@ChaseFlorell Correct. –  Arnold Zokas Jan 25 '12 at 20:35
    
see my answer below. –  Chase Florell Jan 25 '12 at 20:37
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I cannot think why you need to do this, however, I think the simplest would be to create your own IControllerFactory. In MVC3, there is also new interface IControllerActivator.

public interface IControllerActivator
{
    /// <summary>
    /// When implemented in a class, creates a controller.
    /// </summary>
    IController Create(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType);
}

Here is an example using Unity,

public class UnityControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory
{
    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    private readonly IUnityContainer _container;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="UnityControllerFactory"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="container">The container.</param>
    /// <param name="controllerActivator">The controller activator.</param>
    public UnityControllerFactory(IUnityContainer container, IControllerActivator controllerActivator)
        : base(controllerActivator)
    {
        ////Guard.ArgumentNotNull(container, "container");
        _container = new PerRequestUnityContainer(container);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Releases the specified controller.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="controller">The controller to release.</param>
    public override void ReleaseController(IController controller)
    {
        if (controller != null)
        {
            _container.Teardown(controller);
        }

        base.ReleaseController(controller);
    }
}

public class UnityControllerActivator : IControllerActivator
{
    private readonly IUnityContainer _container;

    public UnityControllerActivator(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        ////Guard.ArgumentNotNull(container, "container");
        _container = new PerRequestUnityContainer(container);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// When implemented in a class, creates a controller.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// The created controller.
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="requestContext">The request context.</param><param name="controllerType">The controller type.</param>
    public IController Create(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType)
    {
        ////Guard.ArgumentNotNull(requestContext, "requestContext");
        ////Guard.ArgumentNotNull(controllerType, "controllerType");

        // do what ever you need to before creating your controller

        IController controller = (IController)_container.Resolve(controllerType);
        return controller;
    }
}

and somewhere in your startup/boot strapping process,

IUnityContainer container = ...;

// resolve our factory (and any of it's dependencies)
IControllerFactory factory = container.Resolve<IControllerFactory>();
ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(factory);
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Good suggestion. That worked. Marking as accepted. –  Arnold Zokas Jan 25 '12 at 20:43
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If it were me, I'd run the code through a Custom BaseController

public class BaseController : System.Web.Mvc.Controller
{
    public BaseController()
    {
    }

    protected override System.Web.Mvc.IActionInvoker CreateActionInvoker()
    {
        // Call Custom Code Here

        return base.CreateActionInvoker();

    }
}

From there, you inherit from the base controller whenever you need to.

public class MyController : MyApp.BaseController
{

}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a possibility, but I want avoid using a base controller when possible. –  Arnold Zokas Jan 25 '12 at 20:42
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