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My goal is to create an application that is able to communicate with USB HID devices. The main (UI) thread creates the appropriate handle.

 this.handle =
        Win32.CreateFile(
            devicePath,
            Win32.GENERIC_READ | Win32.GENERIC_WRITE,
            0,
            IntPtr.Zero,
            Win32.OPEN_EXISTING,
            Win32.FILE_FLAG_OVERLAPPED,
            IntPtr.Zero);

After this, two thread is started. The first is reading data from the device continuesly. If there is no available data, it is blocked. It uses overlapped reading. The handle could be passed to a FileStream object, but I have to used P/Invoke calls. My implementation is based on multiple HID libraries. So the thread runs the following loop:

while (true)
{
    var overlapped = new Win32.Overlapped();
    overlapped.Offset = 0;
    overlapped.OffsetHigh = 0;
    overlapped.Event = this.readEvent;

    var readResult = 
        Win32.ReadFile(
            this.handle,
            buffer, 
            (uint)this.InputReportLength, 
            IntPtr.Zero, 
            ref overlapped);

    if (readResult == 0)
    {
        int errorCode = Marshal.GetLastWin32Error();

        // Overlapped operation is running => 0x3e5
        if (errorCode != 0x3e5)
        {
            break;
        }
    }

    var result = Win32.WaitForSingleObject(overlapped.Event, Win32.WAIT_INFINITE);

    if (result != Win32.WAIT_OBJECT_0 || this.handle == IntPtr.Zero)
    {
        // Handle is cleared
        break;
    }

    uint bytesRead = 0;
    Win32.GetOverlappedResult(this.handle, ref overlapped, out bytesRead, false);

    if (bytesRead > 0)
    {
        byte[] report = new byte[this.InputReportLength];
        Array.Copy(buffer, report, Math.Min(bytesRead, report.Length));

        // Report data
        OnDataReceived(report);
    }
}

The second thread consumes commands from a concurrent queue, marshals them into binary, then calls the following method that writes the data to the device.

 IntPtr writeEvent = Win32.CreateEvent(IntPtr.Zero, false, true, Guid.NewGuid().ToString());

 var overlapped = new Win32.Overlapped();
 overlapped.Offset = 0;
 overlapped.OffsetHigh = 0;
 overlapped.Event = writeEvent;

 int writeResult = 
    Win32.WriteFile(
       this.handle, buffer, 
       (uint)buffer.Length,
       IntPtr.Zero, 
       ref overlapped);

 if (writeResult == 0)
 {
     int errorCode = Marshal.GetLastWin32Error();

     // Overlapped operation is running => 0x3e5
     if (errorCode != 0x3e5)
     {
         throw new IOException(string.Format("Cannot write device ({0})", errorCode));
     }
 }

 var result = Win32.WaitForSingleObject(writeEvent, Win32.WAIT_INFINITE);

 Win32.CloseHandle(writeEvent);

 if (result != Win32.WAIT_OBJECT_0)
 {
     throw new IOException("Failed to write");
 }

The application receives data pushed by the device correctly. The program just runs smoothly without any failure. BUT if the application sends data to the device (by placing command objects into the mentioned queue) the whole applications crashes spontaneously. The crash occurs in an indeterministic way. What is the reason behind this? My idea is that it is caused by the concurrent access. However, using the FileStream object (by passing the handle to it) concurrently do not result in such crash.

share|improve this question
    
Nothing to look at, crash details are important. Just don't write this kind of code, use the FileStream(SafeFileHandle, FileAccess, int, bool) constructor so you only have to pinvoke CreateFile and can do everything else the .NET way. –  Hans Passant Jan 25 '12 at 21:40
    
@HansPassant Unfortunatelly I can't give you the details of crash, because the application crashes without exception. I mentioned that I have to implement with P/Invoke. Unless someone has a workaround to push the handle into the FileStream object of Silverlight 5. –  tamasf Jan 25 '12 at 21:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I finally realized what was the problem. Between the P/Invoke call and the completion of the IO operation, the CLR could reorganize the memory layout. The binary buffer or the Overlapped structure might be moved to a new memory area. After the IO completion the result data is written to the original memory area, what results in an application crash.

The solution is to pin the memory areas while the IO operation is pending. The byte array can be pinned with the use of the fixed keyword. The Overlapped struct cannot be pinned like this, instead the GCHandle.Alloc method can be used.

The following code demonstrates the modified write operation:

public unsafe void Send(byte[] data)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[this.OutputReportLength];
    Array.Copy(data, 1, buffer, 1, Math.Min(buffer.Length, data.Length) - 1);

    fixed (byte* bufferPointer = buffer)
    {
        IntPtr writeEvent = Win32.CreateEvent(IntPtr.Zero, false, true, Guid.NewGuid().ToString());

        var overlapped = new Win32.Overlapped();
        overlapped.Offset = 0;
        overlapped.OffsetHigh = 0;
        overlapped.Event = writeEvent;

        GCHandle pinnedOverlapped = GCHandle.Alloc(overlapped, GCHandleType.Pinned);

        try
        {
            int writeResult =
                Win32.WriteFile(
                    this.handle,
                    bufferPointer,
                    (uint)this.OutputReportLength,
                    IntPtr.Zero,
                    &overlapped);

            if (writeResult == 0)
            {
                int errorCode = Marshal.GetLastWin32Error();

                // Overlapped operation is running => 0x3e5 
                if (errorCode != 0x3e5)
                {
                    throw new IOException(string.Format("Cannot write device ({0})", errorCode));
                }
            }

            var result = Win32.WaitForSingleObject(writeEvent, Win32.WAIT_INFINITE);

            if (result != Win32.WAIT_OBJECT_0)
            {
                throw new IOException("Failed to write");
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            Win32.CloseHandle(writeEvent);
            pinnedOverlapped.Free();
        }
    }

}
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